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lol thanks for the post! I cant get a farrier up this far in the mountains so im studying all i can about hooves!
 

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Barefoot trimming is amazing. My mare travels better than she ever did with shoes. I have studied with a farrier so I could do my own horses. My knowledge is pretty much limited to keeping my 3 horses and my moms 2 traveling the trails. I wouldn't ever go back to waiting around for the farrier...
 

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I was forced into doing my own trimming (my little girl "takes aim" at farriers). I went into it kicking and screaming, but then it became an obsession. Mainly because initially I had no idea what I was doing (not that I am an expert now) and was so worried about making a mistake. It amazed me how "interesting" I found something I absolutely did NOT want to learn!!!
 
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Now it is pedi time for my horses. I found all us were much more relaxed now that I am not getting irritated waiting for a farrier who was always late and rude and my horses like the extra attention from me. It is just a better experience now.
 

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I have two out of three horses barefoot and LOVE IT!

It started with my Gaited gelding having lameness issues of sheered and contracted heels. Too many years of too small of shoes and placement being too far back with ROLLING the toe so bad that the horse looked like he was standing on balls instead of feet.
I finally had enough and took the plunge to pull the shoes off him and put him into easyboot epics. This horse has never traveled as well as he does now or stand square as he does now being barefoot.
I will trim them up with the grinder every so often in between trims.

As for our QH mare, she has her front shoes only (because she's a princess LOL) and bare on the hinds and does well.
Our other gaited horse that we acquired in Sept. 2012 wasn't used for a few years and had no shoes so we kept him that way and purchased more epics for him for the trail. Again he travels perfectly barefoot and with boots.
 

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I have have had nothing but good things happen to my horses since switching to barefoot trimming. I'm all for it!
 

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Wish my horses could go barefoot but they don't stay sound. Have to shoe them every riding season. Going to try and keep them barefoot till june this year most years their shod in april. Ill see if my horse will stay sound till june.
 

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My old shoer now only does natural trimming. What sold him on it was a stud he had been working on for years trying to fix who was no longer sound enough to ride or mount a mare to the point they were ready to put him down. Shoer heard about a natural hoof seminar that was in town and decided to attend. Afterwards he talked to the person giving the seminar, called the owner and they went to her place to trim her stud. He looked much better walking away after his first trim, after the second trim his owner was actually able to ride him for the first time since he started going lame.
 

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Trailhorserider, I'm just as obsessed as you. Can't get enough learning in.

Spirit there's nothing wrong with a horse needing shoes. It's not a bad thing, it's a necessary thing.

I remember this farrier wrote that he would trail ride on the lovely mare who was a nice steady anyone could ride horse. He had a friend come down to ride with him. He had his horses shod this time because they were going on long trail rides. He gave his friend the nice safe mare to ride. Well, the horse went speeding up and down the trails like a bat outof hell. Gee, I wonder why.
 

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I wonder what the difference is between a barefoot trim, a natural trim, and a well balanced trim with a blunted edge to prevent chips and flares?

A good trim is a good trim, isn't it?
 

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I wonder what the difference is between a barefoot trim, a natural trim, and a well balanced trim with a blunted edge to prevent chips and flares?

A good trim is a good trim, isn't it?
I read a couple books about the natural hoof after my shoer introduced me to it. There are some differences between trimming styles but how different really depends on the person doing the trimming and who trained them. Basically the natural hoof trim was developed by looking at how horses feet naturally develop out on the range and immitating that. There's places where hoof is removed to promote flexing of the entire hoof. A "normal" trim leaves behind more of a flat surface for horses to walk on and so doesn't promote as much flex. Flexing allows a horses frog to perform it's function in life better. For those who don't know, frogs help pump blood in the legs. So a frog that is allowed to function properly will make for a sounder horse.

It's really easy to see the differences with diagrams, not so easy for me to explain without a hoof in my hand.
 
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