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Dahlia is my 17-18ish old Tennessee Walking Horse mare. I’ve had her since November of 2019.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all
I’ve heard of and seen many people clip in the fall and winter to avoid excess sweat in the cold while working. But I’ve never seen it done in summer when it’s hot out. I’ve thought that it’s probably so they don’t sunburn and that the summer coat shouldn’t be messed with, but is that the case?
As previous posts suggest, my mare sweats like CRAZY in the pasture. It takes only a couple days for her to be caked in sweat. I’ve roached her mane in hopes of keeping her cool, but that does make me curious of how others may manage this heat. I also know folks like to clip for shows, but I don’t know much else about that..
so do people clip in the summer???? Or is that too uncomfortable or dangerous??
 

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I have no idea what the current wisdom is but in my country horses are happily clipped throughout summer, not so much in winter. Maybe leave the back unclipped to prevent sunburn but around here no one does it. I personally don’t clip but plenty at my yard are clipped. I am not sure if there are any side effects, but I’ve never heard anyone complaining.
 

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I don't clip (our winters are cold so they need the fur), but I have seen some clip in the spring ahead of hot summer weather if their horse isn't shedding out very fast. I don't see any reason not to clip in summer, however, I know that here at least, my horses start to grow their winter coat in the middle of summer. Weird, I know, but makes sense because it takes a while. Around July, they start shedding their summer coat as a new coat begins to grow slowly under it. By October, they are pretty fuzzy and it's not even that cold out yet. So I suppose you could be clipping hair that they will need come winter.
 

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Dahlia is my 17-18ish old Tennessee Walking Horse mare. I’ve had her since November of 2019.
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't clip (our winters are cold so they need the fur), but I have seen some clip in the spring ahead of hot summer weather if their horse isn't shedding out very fast. I don't see any reason not to clip in summer, however, I know that here at least, my horses start to grow their winter coat in the middle of summer. Weird, I know, but makes sense because it takes a while. Around July, they start shedding their summer coat as a new coat begins to grow slowly under it. By October, they are pretty fuzzy and it's not even that cold out yet. So I suppose you could be clipping hair that they will need come winter.
None of our horses out here shed early, it’s just so hot and muggy. Our winters are mild and take a while to set in, so I think she’ll be alright.
 

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One of the horses at my barn has (I believe) undiagnosed Cushings, and his coat gets really long and thick very quickly. He get clipped at the start of the summer. It doesn't seem to hurt him. Maybe if you do it at the start of the summer it gives their skin time to adjust to the sun?
 

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I'd say clip as needed.

My horses were clipped during the autumn and winter months. I stopped late winter/early spring depending on the coat. They had anything from a narrow bib to hunter clip.

At the moment, one hairy native in heavy work has just been clipped and will stay clipped over the winter, the others will be done shortly; friends' cobs and showjumpers have been fully clipped for most of the summer depending on weather and work; and, a small pony with cushings has his body done, while his legs are long like fluffy black stockings.
 

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If your horse sweats that much, then carefully clip...
Make sure you do not clip to short cause you will sunburn the animal...dark skinned animals burn just a light skin animals do.

I would actually do a trace clip or similar but leave some of the protection of a bit more coat where the sun beats so much.
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Specific areas of heavy sweating I would look to remove....underside of neck, around belly & flanks, girth-line...but I would also be looking to allow the horse to loft that coat for some sunscreen protection it allows.

A older thread that discussed clipping and blades to use is still applicable for this time of year.
You don't want to scalp a coat and expose that vulnerable skin using to short a blade-cut length.
I was a participant on that thread and the information shared then, is pertinent today.
Hope that helps some, and remember...you use a "pattern" for the idea of what it can look like, but you can always tweak it to what your horse needs and would most benefit from.
Start with the least removed and clip more if need be...
Don't take everything if you don't need to for the horses comfort...
Sharp blades, lubricating/cooling oils and sprays and extra blades to change off with when yours begin to warm to much for the horses comfort level.
Lots of patience and time when you do this...and if it takes a day or two but the horse is happiest and willing to stand quietly better when this is spread out over a bit of time....it is what I would do.
Good luck and happy clipping.
🐴... jmo...
 

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I can’t remember if youv’e had her tested for insulin resistance and Cushings?

TWH Joker was a very heavy sweater. Until I got his insulin numbers back into the normal range, he would foam between his legs.

He was diagnosed IR in 2012 but not diagnosed with Cushings until 2019. It could also be the heavy sweating was a precursor to Cushings.

TWH’s are predisposed to IR, Cushings can go hand-in-hand. If you haven’t had her tested for either, it’s something to think about😀
 

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My gelding sheds out so slick there's nothing really to clip. He's not a heavy sweater anyway (in fact he suffers from anihidrosis in the really bad heat/humidity during this time of year). He also doesn't have much mane to speak of (appaloosa).

I've always understood that horses' manes actually help keep bugs off their necks (and faces if they have a good forelock). Likewise, I'd be worried about clipping a horse so close that it doesn't have any coat to help give some protection from biting insects and the sun.

I make sure my gelding has ample shade (preferably with a fan) available for him to chill out and escape the heat and bugs as needed. And I don't worry about him sweating. In fact, after a few summers of him NOT sweating and getting dangerously overheated, I rejoice in a nice sweaty horse! That's how they cool off. I know when I'm out at the barn and working up a sweat, the instant a breeze blows up or I step into the shade I'm much cooler than if I wasn't sweating.

I also rinse my horse off every few days if it's been really hot and he's gotten sweaty. Just to protect his coat from fading and to freshen him up a little.
 

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I have never clipped any of my horses, unless for a injury that needed to be cleaned up. Here in Texas we are HOT and I feel if you clipped body clipped a horse you would be asking for problems for the poor horse because of the heat and insects. If you feel you have to body clip do a trace clip or where you feel your horse sweats the most, if your horse has sensitive skin I would not clip, a razor burn could turn into something nasty for a really sensitive skinned horse when bugs/insects are doing what they do best, you got to think about bug/insect protection for a horses sensitive skin if you live where the insects will eat a horse up. I feel mother nature takes pretty good care of the horse but I do understand sometimes horses need the help if they have any Metabolic issues or crushing's (hormone disorders). As I have stated in my other posts on different threads about the heat, I just hose mine off in the evenings and maybe every two weeks I may give them a good bath with Shampoo.
 

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Dahlia is my 17-18ish old Tennessee Walking Horse mare. I’ve had her since November of 2019.
Joined
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162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I can’t remember if youv’e had her tested for insulin resistance and Cushings?

TWH Joker was a very heavy sweater. Until I got his insulin numbers back into the normal range, he would foam between his legs.

He was diagnosed IR in 2012 but not diagnosed with Cushings until 2019. It could also be the heavy sweating was a precursor to Cushings.

TWH’s are predisposed to IR, Cushings can go hand-in-hand. If you haven’t had her tested for either, it’s something to think about😀
I have not, but she doesn’t really show any other signs of IR or cushings. And she’s not sweating to the point where she’s soaked whenever I see her, but enough that she’s uncomfortable and itchy.
 
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