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Sun bleached!

558 Views 34 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  horselovinguy
Hi alll :)

My bay geldings tail needs a makeover, it’s sunbleached from being in the sun so much during the summer and i really want his tail to be all black again, this summer I’m planning on trying to get a shampoo that helps prevent sun bleaching, but until then I’m afraid his now brownish tail is not going to go away ever.. someone told me to use (human) hair dye and dye it, I don’t know how safe this is though.. anybody have a similar situation and any tips on how to get his tail black again?
I know there’s like the quic black shampoo, but it enhances the black but doesn’t really dye it.

not to mention his legs are getting sunbleached.. I was thinking about trying to quic black shampoo on his legs.

his mane doesn’t get sunbleached, just his tail.

also he’s been rubbing his tail, I keep washing it, scrubbing it, I got all the dead skin and dandruff out and his “scalp” looks a ton better but he keeps rubbing and breaking the hair off, which makes it frizzy and the hair to go everywhere and be spiky.
oh I also don’t brush his tail, I use a detangler and use my fingers.

I’m assuming his sheath needs to be cleaned and I absolutely hate doing that, but it’s worth it I guess.. I’ll do that the next warm day.


Anyway can you trim it to not make it look so bad and spikey?


what’s frustrating is that his mane grows like a weed while his tail won’t grow at all. I was hoping to get his tail thick and fluffy at the end and show-quality (though he’s not showing, I like him to look nice) while the dock and the middleish of his tail is thick, the end of it is extremely thin. Ugh!
I know I made another thread a little while ago about his tail, I’m going to get a tail bag and wash his tail weekly, maybe that’ll help, and make it thick at the end.


all advice is welcome. 😅
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I've tried that shampoo for black coats once several years ago. The only thing that it did was turn my hands blue. I don't know, maybe you have to use it over and over. My suggestion would be to keep the tail bagged and keep the sheath clean.
 

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I'd cut his tail and go from there. I like to trim to right above the fetlocks to mid-cannon height. Even with decreasing the length, if the tail is super stringy and thin at the bottom, a trim will make it look so much healthier and full. It will then all continue to grow out fully, rather than just getting longer and stringier.

It's very important to keep a geldings sheath clean - there is no getting around it. Depending on the horse, twice a year may be often enough but my gelding requires a good clean every 2-3 months. Make sure you check for a bean!
 

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Prior to trimming:
Horse Liver Working animal Water Sorrel

After trimming (about a year after - she actually had a thinner tail at this point (I think) from living in chain link fencing):
Horse Vertebrate Helmet Equestrian helmet Horse tack

I'm also very luck to own a horse that is genetically blessed with hair growth!
 

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Alot of times when a horse is fading or getting sun bleached is from lacking minerals this is called rusting, mine did it untill I put them all on a mineral supplement like California Trace minerals or MVP's mineral supplement, I have noticed a big change in my horses coats and mane/tail color. Alot of times its the Copper and zinc they are lacking. But you need to read up on it like I did to get that sun Bleaching to stop, I hated the way my horses were looking befor I started the minerals.
Now for hair growth I dont know I have one gelding that grows a crazy thick tail and I have to trim it all the time since I dont want it dragging the ground but he grows a thin mane, another gelding has hardly a tail and thinning and getting shorter as he gets older but he grows a super mane. :(
 

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Shopping

As for the itching, make sure you are up to date on your de-worming schedule and maybe put some MTG on it. As for the fading, I would try the dark shampoo - otherwise, eh... I would not dye it. For shows you can always buy the black spray paint to darken it.
 
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Anyway can you trim it to not make it look so bad and spikey?
Sheath cleaned, worming UTD....

And stop washing his tail with shampoo.....
You're drying out the skin of the dock....that dry skin makes them itchy and scratch they do by backing into, busting off the tail hairs....
A little is fine, a lot is not when it comes to washing and using products to enhance....they often do the opposite when to much to often occurs.
Although it will look a bit greasy I would actually use some baby oil and work it into the tail shaft and skin....
I despise MTG for the stench and to many horses have adverse reactions of chemical skin burns....you need to be very careful with that stuff.... BEWARE!
So a mixture of baby oil and mouthwash can stop the itch and rubbing the horse is doing...

So to make a tail appear thicker, de-tangle it by hand...and "bang" cut it.
Straight across.... Leg Horse Working animal Fawn Horse supplies
Horse English pleasure Helmet Bit Horse tack

Angling and tapering by cutting or pulling "thins" the tail.
Polo ponies by me are tail dock shaved as it helps them cool faster...
It also can make the illusion of thinning a to fat butt on a obese horse.
It can also hide the broken and rubbed out top of a tail during show season... as can applying Show Touch-Ups..

These tails have much damage at the dock..."repaired" correctly it disappears and blends in looking natural in a pulled tail dock done....
Liver Wood Metal Composite material Art
Horse Working animal Liver Horse tack Eyelash
Fawn Snout Natural material Wood Grass
Wood Fawn Dog breed Liver Flooring

The last picture is a eventing horse with tail managed to help them cool after a strenuous outing on a course...

The secret to using the Show Touch-Ups @farmpony84 linked is....
If you don't need, or want, to invest in a fake tail, you can spray one in. Show Touch Ups are literally fluffy pigments in a can. You can use one, or more, colors to fluff up your horse's tail.
Fan it all out, and start to apply some spritzes from the inside out. from..proequinegrooms.com
Hot oil treatments also can help stimulate hair growth...found in the human hair care aisle, store brand is fine. I've used Suave brand in the past with decent results..
Some may use coconut oil...

Massage it into the base of the mane or tail and leave it, don't wash it out. Apply as often as you like it will soften the tail and promote growth as it is a nourishing oil.
You can also "feed" coconut oil to a horse and watch their coat start to glisten more in the sun...caution it can also add pounds your horse may not need.

Some tips shared grooms did when preparing the horses for the "A" & "B" circuit shows.... ;)
Don't despair, it will grow back but you do need to find why the horse is scratching in the first place and correct that...

🐴...
 

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I am a tail nut so I keep all of mine in tail bags.
They are shampooed once a month during the winter but I still pul them out, condition with oil/leave in conditioner and rebraid/bag weekly.
Summer time I wash more often usually twice a month and follow the other steps. I do 'bang' cut my tails as well. My buckskin had nasty dead baby hair that was sunbleached and doing this method it is finally all gone and she has a tail down to the ground. She however has a phenomenal hair gene. My sorrels tail is my most revent project she is following the same regimine and her tail is finally below her hocks.
I would do a fecal test on top of the sheath cleaning if both are ruled out then I would see about putting him on an allergy supp/medication.
I believe a lot of people dye manes and tails but I have honestly never done it, maybe look for the pet safe kind though? As far as the coat bleaching this I agree can be due to mineral deficiencies.Most of the time for feed through coat supplements you need to start before the winter coat comes in I believe but they could be worth a try.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sheath cleaned, worming UTD....

And stop washing his tail with shampoo.....
You're drying out the skin of the dock....that dry skin makes them itchy and scratch they do by backing into, busting off the tail hairs....
A little is fine, a lot is not when it comes to washing and using products to enhance....they often do the opposite when to much to often occurs.
Although it will look a bit greasy I would actually use some baby oil and work it into the tail shaft and skin....
I despise MTG for the stench and to many horses have adverse reactions of chemical skin burns....you need to be very careful with that stuff.... BEWARE!
So a mixture of baby oil and mouthwash can stop the itch and rubbing the horse is doing...

So to make a tail appear thicker, de-tangle it by hand...and "bang" cut it.
Straight across.... View attachment 1143525
View attachment 1143527
Angling and tapering by cutting or pulling "thins" the tail.
Polo ponies by me are tail dock shaved as it helps them cool faster...
It also can make the illusion of thinning a to fat butt on a obese horse.
It can also hide the broken and rubbed out top of a tail during show season... as can applying Show Touch-Ups..

These tails have much damage at the dock..."repaired" correctly it disappears and blends in looking natural in a pulled tail dock done....
View attachment 1143529 View attachment 1143530 View attachment 1143531 View attachment 1143533
The last picture is a eventing horse with tail managed to help them cool after a strenuous outing on a course...

The secret to using the Show Touch-Ups @farmpony84 linked is....
If you don't need, or want, to invest in a fake tail, you can spray one in. Show Touch Ups are literally fluffy pigments in a can. You can use one, or more, colors to fluff up your horse's tail.
Fan it all out, and start to apply some spritzes from the inside out. from..proequinegrooms.com
Hot oil treatments also can help stimulate hair growth...found in the human hair care aisle, store brand is fine. I've used Suave brand in the past with decent results..
Some may use coconut oil...

Massage it into the base of the mane or tail and leave it, don't wash it out. Apply as often as you like it will soften the tail and promote growth as it is a nourishing oil.
You can also "feed" coconut oil to a horse and watch their coat start to glisten more in the sun...caution it can also add pounds your horse may not need.

Some tips shared grooms did when preparing the horses for the "A" & "B" circuit shows.... ;)
Don't despair, it will grow back but you do need to find why the horse is scratching in the first place and correct that...

🐴...
Thank you! I was looking at the show touch ups, but I wasn’t sure if it worked that great and saw bad reviews, but since two people said it already, I’m definitely going to try it.
 

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I would clean his sheath. If he’s rubbing his tail it could be because it’s the only place he can scratch, but it’s not his tail that’s itchy. Put some gloves on and go.

If you want to do hunters, do not pull the top or bang the tail. Dressage horses usually have banged tails and hunters have a natural look. Most hunters use a fake tail eventually and braid the top. If the tail is pulled you can’t braid it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I would clean his sheath. If he’s rubbing his tail it could be because it’s the only place he can scratch, but it’s not his tail that’s itchy. Put some gloves on and go.

If you want to do hunters, do not pull the top or bang the tail. Dressage horses usually have banged tails and hunters have a natural look. Most hunters use a fake tail eventually and braid the top. If the tail is pulled you can’t braid it.
Thanks for telling me that. I went to a hunter show last month and was surprised to see a banged tail as well as a few horses with pulled tops (or the dock being shaved) whatever you want to call it..
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Plans changed and I can’t even imagine him being show ready by April.. I’m hoping by summer, fall, or next year I can show him if he’s ready and if I still have him, should I still though bang his tail just to get rid of the stringy thin growth at the bottom of his tail and let it grow healthier from now on? Or should I just give it a tiny trim?

when I show him it’ll definitely be at just some simple schooling shows, though I do want him to look the best do I necessarily need to braid it? I’d definitely braid in the bigger shows.. I guess it wouldn’t hurt to braid in the schooling shows just to look nice over all.. but currently his dock really bothers me lol!

Next time I go to my local tack shop I’m going to get a tail bag! Oh and I’ll also get some baby oil and or coconut oil.
 

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should I still though bang his tail just to get rid of the stringy thin growth at the bottom of his tail and let it grow healthier from now on? Or should I just give it a tiny trim?
From what you are saying and describing the bottom length of his tail is damaged, stringy and sparse....
For myself. I don't find that a attractive sight seen...
Poor hair quality to me is a reflection of past care...notice I said past.
It is all in what you want your horse seen as and how it is seen.....
From straggly hair, sun bleached and untidy to a smart appearance of healthy the choice is only yours to make.

For me, I would not cut off large amounts of length....I would not.
But I would cut the tail so when the animals is standing still, squarely on their feet {not resting a hoof} carefully cut it so its even with the bottom of the pastern/ankle joint gets it off the ground, not dragging and not being stepped on breaking it further.

On a straggly bottom you are not going to see much of the "bang" and blunt that makes in appearances actually.
It is fuller tails and those who braid in fake tails to enhance {beauty is in eye of beholder} the look that you truly see thick flowing......except for few breeds known for immense flowing locks to me, the over abundance is fake and detracts from the horses naturally carrying their tail when added weight now hangs....the arch is not what it could or should be if left to natural. Up to 2 pounds of tail weight braided in is a lot of extra...more common is 1 pound and except for a few, it is noticeably seen the exaggerated extra so do be careful....

As for pulling/shaving the top....it isn't to shave him clean to the skin...
If you already have broken and a mess you're not braiding the tail anyway...
To make small alterations to make a more uniform appearance....again...appearances is what it is all about in the hunter ring.
Technically he should be braided mane and tail but if he doesn't have a top of the tail to braid then minimize the damages is where I would consider...
For local shows many not braid just pull a mane....forget a tail being anything done to it.
As his tail grows out hopefully he not break so many of the longer hairs off...

Updown is correct....banging is not normally done but don't tell that to the local kids here who show hunter and equitation..
Nearly every horse is tail blunt cut entering the ring...either they not know better or it is a new fad emerging.
Just like you never used to see layers of pads under a saddle nor large squares forget colored pads....now that is normal and......
So because it was does not mean it is today either. Sadly, traditions are changing and some not for the better.
🐴.. jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
From what you are saying and describing the bottom length of his tail is damaged, stringy and sparse....
For myself. I don't find that a attractive sight seen...
Poor hair quality to me is a reflection of past care...notice I said past.
It is all in what you want your horse seen as and how it is seen.....
From straggly hair, sun bleached and untidy to a smart appearance of healthy the choice is only yours to make.

For me, I would not cut off large amounts of length....I would not.
But I would cut the tail so when the animals is standing still, squarely on their feet {not resting a hoof} carefully cut it so its even with the bottom of the pastern/ankle joint gets it off the ground, not dragging and not being stepped on breaking it further.

On a straggly bottom you are not going to see much of the "bang" and blunt that makes in appearances actually.
It is fuller tails and those who braid in fake tails to enhance {beauty is in eye of beholder} the look that you truly see thick flowing......except for few breeds known for immense flowing locks to me, the over abundance is fake and detracts from the horses naturally carrying their tail when added weight now hangs....the arch is not what it could or should be if left to natural. Up to 2 pounds of tail weight braided in is a lot of extra...more common is 1 pound and except for a few, it is noticeably seen the exaggerated extra so do be careful....

As for pulling/shaving the top....it isn't to shave him clean to the skin...
If you already have broken and a mess you're not braiding the tail anyway...
To make small alterations to make a more uniform appearance....again...appearances is what it is all about in the hunter ring.
Technically he should be braided mane and tail but if he doesn't have a top of the tail to braid then minimize the damages is where I would consider...
For local shows many not braid just pull a mane....forget a tail being anything done to it.
As his tail grows out hopefully he not break so many of the longer hairs off...

Updown is correct....banging is not normally done but don't tell that to the local kids here who show hunter and equitation..
Nearly every horse is tail blunt cut entering the ring...either they not know better or it is a new fad emerging.
Just like you never used to see layers of pads under a saddle nor large squares forget colored pads....now that is normal and......
So because it was does not mean it is today either. Sadly, traditions are changing and some not for the better.
🐴.. jmo...
Thank you. It’s about at his fetlock length, not dragging on the ground, just very thin.
 

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Plans changed and I can’t even imagine him being show ready by April.. I’m hoping by summer, fall, or next year I can show him if he’s ready and if I still have him, should I still though bang his tail just to get rid of the stringy thin growth at the bottom of his tail and let it grow healthier from now on? Or should I just give it a tiny trim?
Any hair that you can easily see through, cut. I wouldn't go any shorter than mid-cannon, but as soon as you get rid of the stringy bits, it will look so much healthier and fuller.

Tiny trims are better for maintenance once you are already working with a healthy looking tail, IMO.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Here’s his tail, as you can see very sun bleached and Spikey.. it bothers me SOOOOO much.

Sky Horse Working animal Neck Liver

should I trim up those spikey pieces or just let it gore out?

his tail was like this when I got him (a bit better now) I just didn’t have time to think about it, but finally I have tons more time since work slowed down.

I circled the pieces that bother me. Should I let these grow out or trim them?
Hair Sky Plant Working animal Tree


(Also yes I know he could use more weight.. Ive been thinking about feeding him coconut oil for some extra weight gain, since there’s not much grass)
 

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Look up Rusty coats and tails on horses, its a deficiencies in minerals as in copper and zinc to cause that ugly rusting in a horses mane and coat like whats going on with this horse. .You see it alot in bays,brown and black horses
 
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