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I'm trying to choose a tow vehicle for towing a 16 foot gooseneck trailer. Deciding between a Ford superduty long bed super cab and a Ford superduty long bed crew cab. The cab storage factor isn't an issue--both would be just fine in terms of storage.

I've read a longer wheel base will provide better tow stability and handling while on the road, and safety is most important to me. The crew cab has a wheel base that is 14 inches longer than the super cab.

On the other hand I've read a shorter wheel base makes maneuvering and turning easier.

My question: will I be able to feel a difference in tow stability from the 14 extra inches of wheelbase when hauling a 16 foot gooseneck?

Oh, I should note that I won't have any horses in the trailer, it will be a camping trailer. But I thought everyone here might have a good sense for my question :)
 

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If you're only towing a 16 foot camping trailer, go with the super cab-----that extra 14 inches really affects turning radius and maneurverability.
 

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The Fords I have driven take a lot of room to turn. Oh My Word!

Go with the shorter pickup.

I pulled our 16foot bumper with our Durango and no problem turning around where I wanted to. With our extra cab long bed Ford....... ug. it takes a lot of room to turn.

Its a really short trailer, you wont have any issues. Bed length IMO is most important. Long bed so you dont have to worry about hitting your cab.
 

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I will NEVER say this to DH but his 1988 F-350 crew cab has a lot more stability than my heavy duty 1978 3/4 ton long bed GMC. I have that old GMC beefed up to pull but it still isn't as stabile as the dually.

That's another thing ---- if one of the trucks is a dually, that would be my preference, even though it costs more to work on.

I hauled my horses, in a 4-horse open stock trailer, cross-country twice with the old GMC. I could parallel park that rig. Not even close with the F-350, lol

It will come down to what you think you feel the most comfortable with to drive. If you buy a truck that you're mentally unsure of, then you will be, and that is added stress of hauling horses that you don't need. <----- I say that because I have a friend who made that mistake:)
 
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The biggest issue with a dually is they are helpless off road in muddy or snowy conditions and have more tendency to slide than a regular 4 tire pickup----those duals act as "floatation" devices so the duals will just spin out and dig down deeper into the ground without going forward.
 

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The biggest issue with a dually is they are helpless off road in muddy or snowy conditions and have more tendency to slide than a regular 4 tire pickup----those duals act as "floatation" devices so the duals will just spin out and dig down deeper into the ground without going forward.
You most certainly want either weight on the back end or some sort of differential locker and preferably both when driving a dually in slick conditions.
 

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You can't put enough weight in the back end of a dually out here to keep them from just digging themselves deeper. Everybody I know who drives a dually has the same problem in wet, muddy or snowy, off paved road conditions. Our dually has a differential lock system, but that doesn't really help.
 

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Now we're getting into tire selection and 4 wheel drive. Most people run street tires or AT's on their duals which don't give the best grip in slick conditions. Personally I don't blame them, saves money in the long run but they'll get farther with traction tires when the going gets slick.

Then of course there's 4 wheel drive, getting your front end pulling for you helps a lot. Still wont save your bacon in every condition but it certainly helps, heck I've a dually get stuck on wet grass.
 

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The biggest issue with a dually is they are helpless off road in muddy or snowy conditions and have more tendency to slide than a regular 4 tire pickup----those duals act as "floatation" devices so the duals will just spin out and dig down deeper into the ground without going forward.
Yes, those of us that haul in ice and snow, do not chose dullys, for this very reason!
For many years, I hauled our gooseneck with a long box supercab 3/4 ton 4 x 4 Silverado diesel
The greater turning radius was a pain!
We now have a heavy duty 3/4 ton 4 x 4 gas chev turbo, short box. Just took it for it;s first out west haul today, and have also hauled down the highway to a show with it, It is a club cab, and found it very stable and so much easier to maneuver
 

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My biggest issue with my 99 F350 4x4 dually crew cab is the turning radius.

"Give me 40 acres and I'll turn this rig around".
 
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