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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm curious. How do you do yours? The bottom pic is what I was always taught is the correct way, but I've seen aaaaallllll manner of arrangements, I swear.

What do you do?
 

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The bottom pic is the correct way to do it.

Most well designed modern blankets don’t need leg straps though, even though some do come with them.
I mainly buy Premier Equine blankets/rugs now and they just have a fillet string/tail strap in a plastic sleeve. They always stay in place.
 

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Looped, like the second picture. At least, that's what I'm aiming for. Sometimes I go out there to take them off and I find that they seem to have unlooped themselves and are just crossed. Maybe there are horse blanket gremlins in the pasture doing it. It can't be that I don't do it correctly...
 
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I was taught and always do the second picture if it has leg straps. Loop one leg through the other.
 

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I agree with Jaydee, no need for leg straps with the X surcingles, only a fillet string across the back to stop the rug from blowing over their backs.
 

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Also, it's amazing the number of people who used to forget that it had leg straps and attempted to pull off the rug without removing them, causing the horse to panic.
 

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The bottom pic is the correct way to do it.
they just have a fillet string/tail strap in a plastic sleeve.
I agree with Jaydee, no need for leg straps with the X surcingles, only a fillet string across the back to stop the rug from blowing over their backs.
My t/o all have criss-cross surcingles...and leg straps.
The fillet strap to me is disgusting as it hangs in the way of the manure falling and is always crusted full of poop, now wiping the hindquarters...gross.
Even if I leave the tail "under" the strap, the horses move the tail "over" and now poop on the string.
I will not purchase a blanket with fillet string because of what my horses do when defecating. :frown_color:

As for the leg straps, one twist or two stops the rub and holds in place and secure...as shown in the second picture shared.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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I prefer them unlooped and uncrossed like you see on tighter straps with some stable blankets. It seems to keep the back half of the blanket down, and I've seen less instances of rubs. Not really sure why, but it works. *Shrugs* I've used the butt rope style as well and I don't mind it, but I second @horselovinguy on the poop issue. Its a nice backup though when one of the leg straps busts and you can just take off the opposite one, shorten it and turn it into the butt strap.
I do think it is important to have something holding down the back of the blanket, here at least we have a lot of wind and if you don't some poor horse gets a Marilyn Monroe experience with their skirt flying up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Also, it's amazing the number of people who used to forget that it had leg straps and attempted to pull off the rug without removing them, causing the horse to panic.
I have done this. :oops: Last winter all the horses at the barn were set up with a single strap under the tail... except one, who always fidgeted his blankets into a mess. Soooo this happened twice. Except the part about the panicking, because he didn't care one bit. I picked the right horse to screw up with!! (Also I always changed blankets while they were eating grain, to avoid the putting-a-toddler-in-a-snowsuit effect.)
 

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I have done this. :oops: Last winter all the horses at the barn were set up with a single strap under the tail... except one, who always fidgeted his blankets into a mess. Soooo this happened twice. Except the part about the panicking, because he didn't care one bit. I picked the right horse to screw up with!! (Also I always changed blankets while they were eating grain, to avoid the putting-a-toddler-in-a-snowsuit effect.)
It happened with me as well; just the once but still...:oops: Luckily, it was with my gelding who probably rolled his eyes at his handless human. The other horses were less forgiving.

I love that imagine of a toddler-in-a-snowsuit :smile:.
 
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