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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am not sure if this is the correct group to post this thread. I live in SE Arizona and this has been one hot summer. Several weeks of continuous mid 90 to low 100's with very little monsoon activity. We have a gelding and a mare and when we open the paddock in the mornings, both are free to roam 18-acres of mostly mesquite with some grass mixed in. Unfortunately, there is very little shade.

One evening last week, during the put up for the evening, my wife noticed that the gelding had been/was sweating. She said his back was damp. It was really warm that day so I figured maybe they had been running or playing. She said she did not think so because the mare did not seem to be sweating. Or at least she felt no dampness on the mare.

I got out the thermometer and checked his temp. I got a reading of 98.9 and I felt that was odd. He is normally around the century mark. Last night, I noticed his chest was dark in color. He is a buckskin and he is usually bright tan. I rubbed his chest and it was wet. Also, there were white crusty areas on his back and rump. Kind of like the dried salt you see from a heavy workout around the tack edges. I did not take another temp reading.

I have searched for some information but so far I have found none. He is not overweight, as some may think that would be the cause because of little shade and in the direct sunlight most of the day. He does not seem bothered. He is eating well. He is drinking water normally and we try to keep there water under 80-degrees. I guess I am asking if anyone else has seen this before and if I should be concerned?

I know this was kind of long but I was trying to give as much info as possible. All comments are appreciated.

Thanks
Chuck:runninghorse2:
 

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I don’t have an answer, unless he has eaten something that is making him ill.

I would shower him down and get all that salt washed off him, before he develops rain rot from it and the gathering of dirt.

Continue to take his temperature and monitor his behavior; ie is he mopey, depressed, starting to lose weight, etc.

Hopefully you have a vet in your area, if you need to call one.

I will say my horses have started growing their winter coat, and they are hot, sweaty, miserable in this southern Middle Tennessee heat/humidity. I shower them down at night and they both have big drum fans, on timers, when they go in their stalls for the night. It all helps keep them cooler, less stressed, less chance of colic and ulcers:)

And hopefully someone will come in with a better idea:)
 

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Here in the Midwest anytime the temps are over 90 my horses always are wet with sweat, my gelding bay more than my filly dun. He especially gets salt lines. The humidity here is high and if they don't sweat they would overheat. I know you are probably in a low humidity area. Does he normally sweat like that in the summer or does it evaporate there a lot faster not showing much sweat? Myself and in my area I wouldn't find it unusual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks everyone for your replies and suggestions.
When the monsoons are active, it cools things sufficiently enough not to require any other type of cooling, especially in the evenings. We do not keep our horses stalled during the day, but when we only had the paddock area, we did put box fans in their stalls to hold the flies at bay even though they were free to the paddock. We did not let the fans run all the time as I was apprehensive even using them for a few hours.
We try to spray the gelding when he is willing. He likes the water and will stand for the spray but sometimes he wants nothing to do with it. The mare, as soon as you bring out the wand and the hose, she is leaving. We have worked with her to get her desensitized to the garden hose. You make some success today, and tomorrow, it's like you have done nothing at all. We were told when we purchased her she does not like garden hoses and I always believed we could get her past that issue. We have had her for two years and I still believe we can. She doesn't.
Thanks again walkinthewalk and ksbowman. I appreciate your responses.
 
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