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My pony swims in the creek in her cover! I go to see her and she covered in dripping wet mud with a soaked cover stinking like a pond. Is there an easy way to fix this without having to fence off the stream? And she's grey too -.-
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If it's warm enough for her to go in and swim around on her own, then I'd think it's warm enough for her to not need a blanket on anymore. Taking the blanke off would eliminate it getting wet/muddy/stinky. Does she really need it?
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If it's warm enough for her to go in and swim around on her own, then I'd think it's warm enough for her to not need a blanket on anymore. Taking the blanke off would eliminate it getting wet/muddy/stinky. Does she really need it?
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The thing is, it's not warm at all! It's freezing! She just loves water! And she's normally not covered at all but she's had a cold
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Is there any way to partition off the pond?

That said, having a cold, wet blanket would be worse than having no blanket at all.
 

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The blanket may be making her too warm, thus she heads for the pond. It takes only a few minutes of sunshine to overheat a horse that's wearing a blanket. Horse's love freezing temperatures. If you don't put a blanket on her she can regulate her body temperature and hair as she needs. The blanket interferes with this.
 

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The thing is, it's not warm at all! It's freezing! She just loves water! And she's normally not covered at all but she's had a cold
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It's New Zealand. It's NOT freezing. The water is liquid, not frozen. It is NOT freezing. She doesn't need the blanket. Agree with the other posters, having the blanket on is worse for her than no blanket.
 

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Horses are basically cold weather animals who have much less problems keeping warm than keeping cool. Blanketing really messes up their temperature control system. The equine school at Colorado State University did a study on horses keeping warm. They have 17 levels of warmth they can adjust their hair for if they are just left alone. Two things mess them up. Clipping and blanketing. I ave seen my horses in well below zero F temperatures and not seen them look distressed. Maybe if it was minus 30 or 40F I would worry about them. Minus 20 didn't bother them.
 

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As far as I know, new zealand has much the same climate as Ireland. If that's the case, she is fine without a rug. Most horses go without a rug all year. Unless she is a clipped, underweight, thin skinned thoroughbred, -which I highly doubt she is,- she won't need a rug on!
 

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Horses are basically cold weather animals who have much less problems keeping warm than keeping cool. Blanketing really messes up their temperature control system. The equine school at Colorado State University did a study on horses keeping warm. They have 17 levels of warmth they can adjust their hair for if they are just left alone. Two things mess them up. Clipping and blanketing. I ave seen my horses in well below zero F temperatures and not seen them look distressed. Maybe if it was minus 30 or 40F I would worry about them. Minus 20 didn't bother them.
My horse must be weird, then, because this past winter it was a lot colder than usual. (Usually the coldest it gets is the lower 30's, upper 20's. This year it was in the teens to single digits.) He would be shivering almost every time I brought him in from the pasture to feed! He wasn't even clipped until February.
 

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I wish I had rugs for all my guys this last winter, we had 3 months of hurricane/gale force wind and rain without so much of an hour without. It is the only times in the 6 years I have had the shetlands that I have seen every single one shiver at the same time and these little guys have been bred up here for generations.

That said even up here I don't rug up here we are in the Sub Arctic only 400 miles from the Arctic circle, thankfully we rarely get blow freezing (with out wind chill) but with wind chill it regularly gets bellow freezing as in -20oC. Right now we are having a flaming heat wave for the last few days it is been between 16oC-23.5oC and the shetlands still have their winter coats so are uncomfortable and hot but with the lack of rugs or stables for them I can't clip them.

I would take the rug off of her as it will be horrible for her to carry around and wet, cold, heave rug.
 

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My horse and many others were out in -26°F and had no issues. It was only a few days and went up to single digits but point is if its +30°F like you say then I doubt she needs it. If it was freezing and she was cold she would not go in the pond. She's not stupid, they survive in the wild and in very very cold climates at that. She's telling you she's too hot. She's trying to cool down and then once she does she has no way to warm back up because she's stuck in a wet blanket. Hopefully by now its off her and warming up :) hate these long winters so I feel you there. Wishing you warmer weather :)
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I, also, usually don't blanket my boys until a ice or snow storm comes. They have fairly thick winter coats, so I don't really worry about it. I would most likely take your horse blanket off, obviously she is hot if she is swimming in cold weather.
 
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