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If this has been discussed before, I'm sorry for a redundant post.

Last year, my two-year-old filly chewed the tail of her stall neighbor. Now, he's stuck with a tail about 4-6" shorter than what it was. (Oops, sorry Fury.)

What are some techniques to getting a tail to grow? I told the owner about MTG and Cholestorol (sp?), as well as bagging. Her Amish farrier said "just to bag it and for whatever reason the growth rate is rapid."

I've been graced with horses with nice manes and tails without an issue (which grew well with proper nutrition and good hay), but she wants to "speed it up."

Anyone got some ideas I can pass on to her on the matter?
 

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We used to keep my old gelding's tail braided and tied up. It started out about midway down his cannons in the back and ended up dragging on the ground by a good 6" within a few months. We'd wash it, condition it with cheap human conditioner (like V05 or Suave), then braid it and tie it up while it was still wet.
 

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I've used MTG with quite a bit of success but you have to remember to put it on a couple of times a week-not on the hair, but directly on the tailbone.

In stables where tails are prized, those tails almost never have a real brush or comb taken to them. The hairs are separated out , very carefully and slowly by hand, especially after washing and only when bone dry. Just like in humans, wet hair is weak hair and brushing/combing will break a lot more hairs.

Never had any luck with tail bags, my horses could usually have them off and pounded into the ground within an hour or two!
 

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It will take a year or so to get to a good length again.

There are no potions or treatments that will encourage hair growth, just a good diet that ensures the hair is healthy and strong. My mare lost her tail to a fungal infection and ended up with a tail not much longer than her dock - it was at least two years before her tail was a reasonable length.

Avoid brushing the tail if possible - if you desperately need it to look pretty, wash and condition it, freeing any tangles with fingers while the conditioner is in it - then rinse well. Then finger dry.

Avoid braiding the hair too often as the constant bending of the hair will eventually damage and break it.

To make the tail look thicker, cut the end straight across.

Oils, especially Flaxseed and a supplement with Zinc and Copper help to produce healthy hair.
 

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braided and tied up * * * wash it, condition it with cheap human conditioner (like V05 or Suave), then braid it and tie it up
There are no potions or treatments that will encourage hair growth, just a good diet that ensures the hair is healthy and strong. * * *

Avoid brushing the tail if possible - if you desperately need it to look pretty, wash and condition it, freeing any tangles with fingers while the conditioner is in it - then rinse well. Then finger dry.

Avoid braiding the hair too often as the constant bending of the hair will eventually damage and break it.
Agree with the above. Be careful with MTG - not all horses can tolerate it. My friend's mare had a bad reaction to it. I have never used it, so have no first hand experience with it.
 

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MTG has always helped my horses but use gloves if you don't want your hands smelling like bacon grease for the rest of the day!
Don't use a brush or comb. Only use your fingers.
If your horses tail is very tangled then condition it prior to de-tangling. When I got my mare, her tail was left un-touched for a very long time and had dreadlocks. I sadly had to break some of her tail to get all the tangles out.
Braid your horses tail and put it up. I can't stress enough that it will do more damage if done incorrectly. You want to braid the tail a few inches below where the tail bone ends.
 

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before you add a bunch of supplements, like zinc and copper which can toxicity, have a blood draw done to see if the horse is deficient.
To keep the tail hairs, do not be over combing brushing and messing with it.
hair growth depends on how healthy the horse is.
 

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before you add a bunch of supplements, like zinc and copper which can toxicity, have a blood draw done to see if the horse is deficient.
To keep the tail hairs, do not be over combing brushing and messing with it.
hair growth depends on how healthy the horse is.
Basic supplements will not cause toxicity unless you feed a multitude of them. If a horses coat is poor and they are developing things such as Mudfever and Rainrot, you can be pretty sure they are deficient in both these and more than likely Selenium as well.
 

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I just had a similar incident where another boarders horse ate my Appaloosas beautiful long tail. MTG and keeping it detangled has helped. And a good diet. It will still be a long time till it's long again. I did not bag or braid the tail. I think if it's grouped like that and it got caught or chewed on it would do even more damage
 
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