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Discussion Starter #1
Okay so heres my plan were moving in the fall or later on in the year after our house sells.
Were building a barn i am gonna get some horses plus my horse is complete beginner rider :)
And so yea I was gonna teach beginner lessons.
I am working on getting my cerfitication. But this place is a little exspensive.

My coach told me that Pony club is a way?

What are some other ways? I have been riding since I was 7 I have ridden young green broke horses.
I read so much and study and research stuff.

Anywere beside Pony club.?

Thanks guy!

Oh no need for any rude comments etc.

I am gonna get everything prepared there gonna sign release forms I am gonna make sure I have insurance. My parents will be there to help me. My dad whos pretty much one of my trainer is also gona help me.


I am very responsible for teaching lessons. I have taught a few times I have helped at horse-riding camps. Will continue to help out to get a ton more exsperience.
 

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I personally wouldn't do anything until I was certified. I have passed the PC level which corresponds to my english instructor certification in Canada, but have never filled out the paperwork to have my actual certification so I help some kids out for free because its something I enjoy.
I would go outside of horse riding camps and into an actual operating lesson barn. If you're going to be teaching beginners its important that you are able to communicate the fundamentals - these kids can develop bad habits that are hard to break if you're not 100% correct in what you're teaching. Personally, I would audit lessons for at least five or six months before branching out on my own, I'd want to make SURE that I knew exactly what I was doing.
Also, insurance is liable to cost you an arm and a leg.
Teaching lessons may look easy, but in reality, it's not. You have about seven things going on at once and you need to be able to be in complete control of the situation and be able to communicate effectively with young riders.
Also, if you have a child get hurt, expect your business to drop especially in a small town, as often parents will say "oh, little Jimmy got hurt at so-and-so's barn, don't take your kid there!" especially at a beginner barn where people have no horse sense.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thats what I do I am actual lesson barns. My old coach would have me help her at beginner camps.
I know all the basics of riding. Im very good with kids.

and I do not plan on starting lessons until Im certified I was just asking of what ways can I get certified.

I am paying for me to take these courses aand I have to actually do stuff thats with horses etc.
 

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I'm not sure if it's the same in the states, but have you considered what being a certified riding instructor means for competing in the future? There's a new system out in Canada, where finally you can get certified to teach at the lower levels and not have to compete in Open Class - prior to that however, if you were a certified instructor, as soon as you had your certification it was mandatory to compete Open.

Not sure if you care, or even compete. Have you trained with a certified instructor? And had them mentor you to see if you're at a level where it makes sense to coach?
 

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I live in a small town and being a "ceritified" instructor isn't necessary. I have about 6 students from an even smaller, farming/hippy town (lol) and not one of them has asked if I'm certified. If the kids stay safe, learn everything there is to know about horses and managing them, but most importantly have fun the parents are more than satisfied. Of course, I have to get insurance which is like 700$/year. I suppose it's different for others towns, obviously, but maybe you aren't required to have one? Some places that's all they care about. Who's certified in what and what accomplishments they've made. I guess I have it easy..if I were moving I think it'd be smart on my part to get some sort of certification but I'm good to go for awhile. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm not sure if it's the same in the states, but have you considered what being a certified riding instructor means for competing in the future? There's a new system out in Canada, where finally you can get certified to teach at the lower levels and not have to compete in Open Class - prior to that however, if you were a certified instructor, as soon as you had your certification it was mandatory to compete Open.

Not sure if you care, or even compete. Have you trained with a certified instructor? And had them mentor you to see if you're at a level where it makes sense to coach?
I have been training with certified instructors ever since I was 12:D I may teach at lower levels until I am more older and capable to teach higher levels.
You aren't required to have a certification but I choose to have one for safety reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am very patient with children.
And its been my dream to become a riding instructor thats why I am going to school to get an education degree but I am also with my instructor and she said, eventually she said, I could teach lessons. I know all the basics. I compete but I don't do anything higher then 2'3 at the moment. So as soon as my instructor allows me I will do higher then 2'3 I have jumped 2'6. I haven't jumped higher.
kinda nervous to.
 

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You completely missed my point.

Do you compete/show? In Canada, up until that new certification process was put into place, if you taught with a certification, you had to SHOW at the OPEN level. Which in part makes sense - frankly, if you're able to be competitive at that level, then you have what you need to teach.

All I was saying, is that if you compete, get certified, and then are disqualified from schooling shows because you need to compete on the Open circuit...that is something to consider.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
You completely missed my point.

Do you compete/show? In Canada, up until that new certification process was put into place, if you taught with a certification, you had to SHOW at the OPEN level. Which in part makes sense - frankly, if you're able to be competitive at that level, then you have what you need to teach.

All I was saying, is that if you compete, get certified, and then are disqualified from schooling shows because you need to compete on the Open circuit...that is something to consider.
No actually I didn't miss your point at all.
I compete/show I just said, I did. I am very very competitive as well. I don't get anything above a 4th place in shows either. I have never been disqualified either.

And I have taught many times before. I taught my friend how to ride.

Also this wasnt really the point of my post.
 

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Ok. Are you an FEI rider? I don't think you are. So what I'm saying is, MAKE SURE that getting your certification (instructor cert) doesn't disqualify you from schooling shows all together because you're considered a coach and expected to perform at an open class level.

It would be sad if you couldn't compete at the level you wanted to just because you got your cert.

Make sense?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok. Are you an FEI rider? I don't think you are. So what I'm saying is, MAKE SURE that getting your certification (instructor cert) doesn't disqualify you from schooling shows all together because you're considered a coach and expected to perform at an open class level. Make sense?

It would be sad if you couldn't compete at the level you wanted to just because you got your cert.

Make sense?
Uhm.
no actually that doesn't make sense.


I don't think if I get certified I will get disqualified from shows. Because all I'd be doing is teaching basics of beginner riding. I can still have a riding instructor and everything for myself as well. Plus I don't show that much. so it wouldn't matter.
 

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I give up.

Best of luck though - just read read read before hand so you don't get yourself into something you're not ready for. The fact that you're not quite sure what I mean is of concern - but hey, if you know the basics and are confident you can teach that, then pitter patter get atter.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I have been reading and reading. I am even taking courses to do so :) its really helping.
I have a instructor to help get to were I can even teach beginner lessons. but this is beyond the point of what I was asking.
 

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Here is the Canadian version of what I think you're looking for. I'm looking for the American equivalent now.

Instructor of Beginners (IB): This program is already up and running throughout all provinces. It applies to individuals who teach beginner riders whether in their own backyard, riding schools or at day camps.
English Instructor Requirements

Prerequisites
Candidates for English Instructor must:​

  • Be at least 16 years of age as of January 1st of the current year​
  • Hold an Equine Canada Silver sport license including EC Coach levy and Provincial membership in good standing​
  • Have successfully completed the English Rider Level 1 and 2 of the old EC Learn to Ride English program or the equivalent in the new 2007 Equine Canada English Rider 1-10 program which is English Rider 1-6.​
Old Rider Level 1 New Rider Level 2 Old Rider Level 2 New Rider Level 6 Old Rider Level 3 New Rider Level 8
In addition, the candidate must:​

  • Be familiar with stable management, which include feeding, bandaging, first aid for the horse, tack, stable construction, safety and unsoundness. These areas will be covered in the oral and written tests.​
Program Materials
English Instructor candidates are responsible for the materials in the following manuals:​

These manuals can be purchased through the Equine Canada office or your Provincial office.​
Requirements
Once the above prerequisites have been met, the candidate must complete the following requirements in order to become certified:​

Certification
Once the above requirements have been met, the candidate should apply to their PSO with proof that they have met the requirements. In order to be certified as an English Instructor, the candidate must:​

  • Attend and successfully complete the Equine Canada Instruction of Beginners Evaluation​
Note: Applicants for the Instruction of Beginners program who are under 18 years of age must have their application signed by a parent or legal guardian.​
Note: Candidates can be mentored for the Evaluation by one or more certified Coach/Instructor(s).​
 

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Discussion Starter #15
  • Minimum age: 18 years; no minimum teaching experience required.
  • Must pass all 4 general written tests with an averaged score of 80 or above. Specialty test scores must be 80 or above.
  • No video of instruction is required.
This instructor has a good foundation as a horseman, but because of age or limited teaching experience does not qualify for Level II. The ARICP is recognizing a foundation and a desire to become a certified instructor. Upon reaching 21 years of age, and with 3 years of teaching experience, this instructor may challenge the Level II certification. At that time, the candidate must provide a video (VHS or DVD) and must re-take the written exams. The candidate with a Level I certification receives a substantial discount (50%) when returning to take the program for full certification.


Level II - Instructor of Beginner through Intermediate

  • Minimum age: 21 years; minimum of 3 years of teaching experience.
  • Must pass all general exams with an averaged overall score of 85 or above, and all specialty exams with a score of 85 or above.
  • Must pass video evaluation for Level II.
  • Has his/her own personal philosophy of riding instruction.
  • Clearly knows personal strengths and weaknesses.
  • Has thorough knowledge of specialty taught.
  • Has understanding of safety procedures, and uses them.
  • Has basic knowledge of horses and their care. Has awareness of styles of riding other than own specialty.
  • Rides/has ridden at intermediate level or better.
  • Can teach beginner through intermediate students in a competent manner.
  • Has general knowledge of how horse and rider interact.
  • Understands psychology of the rider.
This instructor enjoys teaching beginners and has the patience for the repetition necessary to develop new skills. The instructor does not rush his students or push them ahead of their physical ability, but allows time to form a solid riding foundation. A certified instructor is training a student to be a horseman, not just a rider. He is concerned with training his students to use proper safety practices and to continue using them as they develop in riding proficiency.

Level III - Instructor of Beginner through Advanced

  • Minimum age: 25 years; minimum of 6 years teaching experience.
  • Must pass all exams with scores of 90 or above on each.
  • Must pass video evaluation for Level III.
  • Is an excellent communicator.
  • Has an outstanding personal philosophy of instruction.
  • Clearly knows his own personal strengths and weaknesses.
  • Has a thorough knowledge of specialty taught.
  • Has an understanding of safety procedures, and uses them.
  • Has a thorough knowledge of horses and their care.
  • Rides (or has ridden) at an advanced level.
  • Has advanced knowledge of training horses.
  • Knows the elements of styles of riding other than his own specialty.
  • Understands the psychology of the horse.
  • Has participated in competition, if competition is an integral part of the style taught.
  • Has knowledge of the practical application of stable management and horse care.
The Level III instructor is able to teach the more advanced rider as well as the beginner and intermediate rider. The instructor has ridden at an advanced level and understands the problems of advanced riders. This instructor is concerned with solving problems, not just dealing with symptoms. The instructor can also help with the training of horses, and can deal with specific training problems of his/her students'; horses. This instructor not only knows how horse and rider interact, but the whys behind it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thats one way here in the U.S. at least thats what my instructor said,
the other way is through the PONY club :)

She is gonna tell me some other ways as well :)
 

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Cool - so where are you at right now in the process? Is your coach letting you mentor with her through her lessons?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cool - so where are you at right now in the process? Is your coach letting you mentor with her through her lessons?
I havent been at this place for very long. But at my old barn I would help out with teaching the beginners at summer camps.
by showing them an helping them tack up. and posting on the horse and the correct ways of riding.
I will be helping this new coach out a lot this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
On a side note, isn't it interesting that Canada's minimum age is 16, and the states is 18?
Yeah it is. But on the side note you don't have to be certified. My friend is a riding instructor.
I would help her out as well. I taught my best-friend how to ride. I am gonna teach my boyfriend how to ride western.

Im over the age of 18
 
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