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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been wanting to do this trick for a number of months now! I want to hear what you guys believe is the best way to teach this, he barely knows liberty, the most I've done is written with a hackamore and bareback. He does follow without the halter on but he's playful too.
I do not have experience in liberty training but I would love too know about it and how to do it! I do not like the idea of the rope around the foot, knowing my horse he will literally lose his marbles. He's desensitized to the rope though, you can swing it around his legs and he'll be fine, I just know that because of his bloodlines the breed he is, he'll react negatively to it.
Any help or advice is well appreciated!:cowboy:

Thanks!
 

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IMO putting a rope around him and forcing him down is not teaching him to lay down, it's forcing him. That's not what I understand as being liberty at all. To me (and people differ I know), liberty is having your horse WANT to be with you and WANT to understand what you're asking, and WANT to do it. Not being physically forced into something.

The book that my daughter was using for trick training Moonshine has you get the horse really wet and take it to a sandy arena, where it will want to roll. After they stop rolling there will be a few seconds where they are just sitting there. You just sit there and pop treats into their mouth one after the other, as long as you can. This teaches them that sitting down can be a good thing. You would then work on the actual signal for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I really like this idea!!!
How well did that go for her? Did the horse finally get it? What were the cues you used to let her know to lay down, how would you tell her those cues?

I like the idea, just not the fact of him getting sandy LOL. :blueunicorn:
 

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If you don't want to use ropes at all - & there are ways to use them without resorting to force - you can ride him until he's sweaty, or give him a wash & take him to an attractive rolling spot & then reward him & 'attach' a cue when he goes down. Do that many times, and then you can start giving the cue as he starts to go down, then just before he goes down, which will teach him to do it on cue. Or you can teach him to do it in steps, such as, teach him to put his nose to the ground, teach him to step his hind feet up to his fores, teach him to kneel, then combine those requests to get him to drop.

As for 'liberty work', I see a lot of people consider playing with a horse without ropes in a pen 'liberty'. While you might have cause to start in a pen for the horse to get the idea, it's not at liberty trapped in a pen with you, and it's often not helping the horse learn to WANT to hang around & play... or teaching the handler how to get their horse wanting to hang around if they don't have to... which is the whole point of 'liberty work' IMO.

Learning behavioural training principles will enable you to understand how to effectively motivate & reward(positively reinforce) your horse for desired behaviours & teach them what you want, along with understanding how to be most effective with the other 'quadrants' of learning(negative reinforcement/release of pressure, positive & negative punishment). With whatever specifics you want to teach, be it 'liberty work' & tricks or otherwise.

Looking up 'clicker training' and focusing on learning the principles at work(the specifics such as using an actual plastic clicker, or whether you use solely '+R' are adaptable) will give you a good understanding of how horses learn, how you can motivate & reinforce them.

do not like the idea of the rope around the foot, knowing my horse he will literally lose his marbles. He's desensitized to the rope though, you can swing it around his legs and he'll be fine, I just know that because of his bloodlines the breed he is, he'll react negatively to it.
Just this bit... I don't believe it has anything to do with a horse's 'bloodlines' or such. Of course some horses/breeds are more 'sensitive' or reactive than others, but it's in the way that you use it, whether you have a 'one size' or 'recipe' type attitude/approach or whether you work with whatever the horse is in front of you at the time - meaning you adjust your approach to be considerate & not 'too much' for that specific moment/horse/situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When I meant by blood lines, the way pasos are trained and dealt with are completely different from the way you would train a non gaited horse as their disciplines are different. He's a super playful stallion, almost acts like a baby, he'll freely want to chase and play, along with follow. I do not like the idea of force as you mentioned. You're ideas are great but I'm not in a place where you would see horses, example Europe or Texas here in the US. Horse items are beyond expensive here, so I'm just trying to do it the non expensive way along with doing it the right way.
I'll consider you're idea and I'll keep you posted on it! Can't wait to try it 🙂

Best,
Emily :cowboy:
 

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When I meant by blood lines, the way pasos are trained and dealt with are completely different from the way you would train a non gaited horse as their disciplines are different.
Specifics of WHAT they're trained to do may differ but good training is good training, and a horse that freaks out at ropes around his legs (or whatever) is simply not well trained(or perhaps well trusting) for what you're trying to do.

He's a super playful stallion, almost acts like a baby, he'll freely want to chase and play, along with follow.
May I ask why you have a stallion? Don't know what you mean by 'acts like a baby' but yeah, stallions can be more 'playful' than mares & geldings, but generally it's not the kind of 'playful' you want to encourage/allow with humans. Eg. chasing, rearing, pawing, herding(following?), biting are all 'playful' stallion behaviours that are potentially extremely dangerous. I wouldn't be encouraging them.

You're ideas are great but I'm not in a place where you would see horses, example Europe or Texas here in the US. Horse items are beyond expensive here,
While hands-on first hand teaching is always better, the principles of c/t & behavioural training can be learned online. I don't know what 'horse items' you mean, as no one's mentioned needing any.

This horse has barely any training, you have no real knowledge on what to do... but you want to train him to do an advanced trick?
That is, and should be, a question. Not assuming OP, that the above is the case, but IF it is, I agree that it's best to concentrate on learning basic training principles & practice first and, with help of an experienced trainer, teach the horse 'the basics', how to be a 'good citizen' and be 'polite'(safe) first & foremost. That's a lot more important, should be a much higher priority than tricks.

So saying, learning how to use 'c/t' effectively by teaching some basic tricks(NOT including chasing, herding, pawing, reaching with his mouth...) can really help you understand & be more effective with all you want to teach, hone your timing on 'harmless' things that don't effect other stuff if you mess up(& you will - we all do, learning new things!).
 

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My father, back in the day taught my paint gelding to lay down, count, teeter totter, say yes and no from the Prof Beery Horse Training booklets. I don't remember what the training consisted of, but he taught him when he was a baby. Would love to see a photo of your boy!
 

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He's a cutie! I have found that if you use electrical tape instead of rubber bands, it keep the mane from breaking. It's what I do for my Arabs and Friesian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh really??? I heard about that, I didn't know it was electrical tape though. Do you use a band before applying it?
 
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