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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took over ownership of Elle in December. And that was just late enough that, even though I knew her teeth needed doing, it was too cold here to have them done. We're finally having warmer weather, so tomorrow at 11am, she's having them attended to by the vet!!

I think it's been at least two years since they were done. And she's dropping some feed and has a heck of a diagonal slant to her incisors. Ugh. On the plus side, she eats hay just fine and with great enthusiasm, and her body condition is fantastic. She has no pain from the bit of from having her mouth handled, poked, and prodded.

I'm sure the vet will go over everything with me anyhow, but does anyone have any insight? Advice? Reassurances? Concerns? I'm also wondering how long I should leave her before she's ridden again. My partboarder is due to ride her again on Thursday evening (but she'll absolutely understand if she needs to wait).

My plan is to go out early and squeeze a quick ride in before the appointment, in case she's off from riding afterwards for a little while. And I've heard that horses shouldn't have access to food for an hour or two after so that the sedation doesn't cause choke. But anything else? I haven't had a horse go through a dental in decades. And never one that was about to turn 24!!

Please note that the attached picture is NOT Elle's mouth, but it is the kind of thing happening up front. Yay... I have no idea what's going on in her molars but I figure it must be "interesting" if the front looks like this. :rolleyes:

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My only caution is drug Sensitivity at her age.

2. I have Walking Horses who are known to be drug sensitive anyway. As they all got into their 20’s they got worse.

Last year, when a new vet tranq’d my 26 yo, he gave Rusty the happy juice before I could say he is drug sensitive. Rusty tried to stay on his feet but he ended up going down.

I drilled the vet in my deadliest monotone voice when I said “you know Rusty is Walking Horse, therefore drug sensitive- especially as they get older—-“.

2. On the tooth pattern, I’ve never dealt with that but I am wondering if her TMJ is out of alignment and has been for a long time? That can be fixed by a quality equine chiropractor.

The same horse, Rusty, is co ing 27 and has had his TMJ adjusted three times in his life.

Good luck and Please let us know how things go:)
 
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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update: all went pretty well! Nothing too surprising, thankfully. Her molars just had the standard, expected sharp edges that needed to be brought down. Some of her front teeth are nearing the end of their lifespans, as she's 24, but they probably have another year or two at least before we have to start talking about extractions. The vet also cleaned up her slanted snaggleteeth a bit in front, but not too aggressively given, again, my horse's age and the teeth's limited remaining years. There was one incisor in particular that's likely going to need to come out in the not-too distant future, but it's an outside lower one and shouldn't be a big deal for her to lose. She was totally fine with sedation, and she also got vaccinated for rabies, tetanus, and equine encephalitis at the same time. The vet was very impressed with her condition for her age! And Elle was very well-behaved -- except during my ride beforehand when she spooked at a cat that was literally at the opposite end of the arena. What a dingaling. But 99% of the time, so perfect! 🥰

So, in short: huuuuuuuuuuge sigh of relief over here!!!
 

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Great Job Elle!!!(y)(y)

That would be a trip to McDonald's if it were the dogs, lollol. Maybe give her some soda cracker treats, since she shouldn't have candy:cool:

I found out by accident my horses LOVE soda crackers (Walmart brand saltines). If I’m going to feed them starchy treats, it might as well be something salty so they want more water, lollol
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great Job Elle!!!(y)(y)

That would be a trip to McDonald's if it were the dogs, lollol. Maybe give her some soda cracker treats, since she shouldn't have candy:cool:

I found out by accident my horses LOVE soda crackers (Walmart brand saltines). If I’m going to feed them starchy treats, it might as well be something salty so they want more water, lollol
Ooo, I'll have to try those with her! I'll have to spoil her with treats another day when her mouth is happier. When I left she was guarding the hay pile from the other mares, but wasn't up for eating it yet. Gotta love my grumpy old alpha mare. :LOL:
 

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File this away for future reference:

If she ever does need tooth extraction, gum surgery, or her mouth rinsed for any reason, an old fashioned turkey baster, is excellent for rinsing their mouth with salt water:)

 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, good to know!!

BTW here's an actual shot of her suuuuuper snaggly front teeth, pre-fixing. Took it this morning. I only WISH they had been just as "bad" as my example photo. Oyyy. I didn't take an after picture, since she'd been through enough, but things are definitely looking a whole lot less chaotic now. (And she doesn't always hold her jaw this "off" left to right but she wasn't enjoying the photo session.) The gums, among other things, indicate possible age-related tooth resorption starting (just an incisor problem thankfully), but if so it's early days for it, so we'll just see where we're at by next spring.

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My goodness, bless her precious self:cry:

She has to feel so much better, even if she stills feels wonky from the drugs and all the work😘

Thank you for giving her a spot in your barn(y):)(y):)
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
My goodness, bless her precious self:cry:

She has to feel so much better, even if she stills feels wonky from the drugs and all the work😘

Thank you for giving her a spot in your barn(y):)(y):)
Believe me, I'm the lucky one to have her!! :) She's still sound (with a little previcoxx to make life easier, but she's still pretty good without it too) and an absolute gem. Between her part-boarder and I, she's still ridden up to six times a week and loves her work! She does pretty basic dressage these days, but can still do fancy-pants things like canter pirouettes, and still likes the odd jump now and then!

Her front teeth do look like she's been neglected but she really hasn't. Her previous owner, I think, let the dental go 2-3 years instead of one year before I bought her. And I can vouch for that because I remember roughly when she was last done. So, not great, but nothing crazy, thankfully! The vet has known this horse for years and says she's always had pretty screwy front teeth, and you can only do soooo much at a time. Compared to those gnarly incisors, her molars were shockingly good and didn't have anywhere near as much edge on them as I suspected! Phew!!!
 

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Elle, 1997 Oldenburg mare
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Though it occurred to me today that, if you had to age her by those incisors, I think the answer would come back "zombie!" o_O
 
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