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This is not mine. It is copied but it destribes the type of horse I want. It destribes the type of horse I produce. My old endurance horse fit this bill perfectly and my new guy, my 4 year old is well on his way.

'Enjoy

A GENTLEMAN’S RIDING HORSE
Nowadays this term is actually rarely used and even when it is, it is much misunderstood. The single term “hacking” definitely does not convey “ that the horse should : go anywhere its rider asks:, at any pace over any terrain alone or in company.

The full description might read:
the horse should: readily respond to all of the rider’s instructions.
and to actively pass:
over highway, along a road a lane a path or a track
at: ground level or along the top of a ridge, through woodland or open countryside
at any pace: walk: active or extended;
rhythmic or fast trot:
medium or extended canter:
collected or extended
gallop : fast or flat out

on any surface ie : tarmac, grass, stoney path, cobble stones or rock,
through: puddle, flood water or wadeable stream
alone or in company of: other riders of every ability from novice to expert;
at the front of the line, in the middle of the line or at the end of the line
amongst: pedestrians, cars, motor cycles, push bikes, lorries, tractors
under: birds, kites, balloons, aircraft or helicopters
in: wind and rain or thunderstorm
despite: plastic bags, umbrellas, road signs, footballs
in the presence of: barking & aggressive dogs, goats, pigs, donkeys & mules

The horse must stand on the kerb, awaiting instruction to cross a busy and fast arterial road.
It must pass over a narrow bridge across a motorway
It must pass through a tunnel laid underneath a motorway
It should hold its line of march down a high street or a country lane with passing places
It must wait upon command at traffic lights or other stops signs.
It must stand attentively whilst its rider converses with passers by
It should move forward and move backwards to permit the opening of field gates
It should never ever, whirl or bolt in fright, in fear or as an evasion.
It should hop over ditches, streams and fallen trees.
It must submit to being tied to a hitching point without pulling back, all whilst patiently awaiting its master.
It must stand to be mounted.
It must ride on or off the bit.
If the rider loses his/her balance, it must pick up the shift of weight and compensate.
The riders job is to set the route,
The horse’s job is to carry safely both itself and the rider over the terrain, whatsoever that may prove to be.
If asked to trot, then the horse should trot, uphill or downhill until asked to change the pace.
If asked to halt, the horse should come to a halt and then stand awaiting it’s master’s pleasure
Never should it evade the bit nor jerk the reins from the rider’s hands.

If the reins are dropped onto the horse’s neck and no further instruction is given, then the horse should make its way at the walk back to the stable by the shortest route.

Under no circumstance must the horse, balk, rear, buck or swerve for any reason except in circumstances when the horse might realize that the way ahead is unsafe for example in land prone to bogs. Neither should the horse snatch succulent plants from the hedgerow however tempting.

As a generalisation the horse must be well mannered and must never show unwarranted aggression to any human or animal (other than in self defence). It must accept being led without resistance.

It certainly never bite, kick, strike and must stand quietly in the presence of strangers.
 

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VERY old and from across the "pond."

I have to say I disagree with quite a bit. The worst being:

If the reins are dropped onto the horse’s neck and no further instruction is given, then the horse should make its way at the walk back to the stable by the shortest route.

Really? Our horses are trained to stand until given instruction to do something different.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
VERY old and from across the "pond."

I have to say I disagree with quite a bit. The worst being:

If the reins are dropped onto the horse’s neck and no further instruction is given, then the horse should make its way at the walk back to the stable by the shortest route.

Really? Our horses are trained to stand until given instruction to do something different.
I ride with no contact through the reins. My legs are relaxed, not gripping the horse and the reins have a droop in them. I do not ride with contact and my hand and arm are relaxed but centered. Centered means my hand and I usually ride one handed is perfectedly centered over the withers. Any movement of my hand off center gets the horse turning to recenter my hand. So if there is no further contact the horse will just follow the
trail making the turns as they come up on his own. No input means the horse follows the trail and if that trail takes me home so be it.
 

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I can walk through tall corn, corn forcing him to push his way through and he will not touch it. Tall grass? not a problem. Once the bit goes in nothing but water crosses his gums. No treats, no snatching bits of taste morsals. Just water. I will slip the bit if I want him to have something to eat.
 

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I like this. But personally, my expectations aren't quite this high. My guys is pretty good about listening to me in all situations though, so I'm happy. :)
 

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I like this. But personally, my expectations aren't quite this high. My guys is pretty good about listening to me in all situations though, so I'm happy. :)
I think this is why RiosDad tends to get frustrated with us and I can understand why. It seems there are way to many people who are satisfied with mediocre, and yet these same people are the ones constantly asking for advice when problems arise and then defending everything they've done. No offense intended, but I don't think individuals should settle for mediocre. It seems to be a trend catching on every in life, and sad to say the least that people don't seem to think it worth having high expectations.

Excellent article RiosDad. This definately gives me things to work on. I will admit to having lapsed into a mild satisfaction at the mediocre. My Arabian mare fits the bill about 75%, and why should I settle for that? My biggest issues with her are the standing aspects. She's a dependable and trustworthy mount in virtually any situation, but she has a very definitive view on always moving forward (or heck, backward, as long as we're moving!) I thought of her as almost ideal, and your article makes me realize I am settling for LESS then ideal because her quirks have never bothered me much. But it gives us something to work on!
 

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I agree wiht the above. I will admit that I am not good at making a horse like that very quickly, but I am young and learning to do better. I try to work my way up to my horse being like this article describes. My last horse had gotten very close, but then I had a car accident where I could not ride for quite a while due to facial injury and pain medications that made riding dangerous. After almost 5 months of NO riding my horse had a lot to refresh, and I had a new found fear to deal with. I am working on my fear, and when I get my next horse this definitely gives me some goals to set to work towards.

My horse had never gone under a highway bridge before until a CTR at the Biltmore Estates...needless to say I got off and we walked under it twice. There are none in my area to practice with, so it was interesting to say the least.
 

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I think this is why RiosDad tends to get frustrated with us and I can understand why. It seems there are way to many people who are satisfied with mediocre,

!
That's exactly it MacabreMikolaj. I do not settle for anything except perfection. I know what it is like to ride a horse as discribed and every horse I start I have those goals in mind. In the beginning I plan his route to incorporate challenges and I overwhelm him with experience right off the bat. In his first week he is running into all sorts of things, scary things that he has to overcome but in short order nothing nothing bothers him.

I was sitting at a light waiting for the cross walk sign to appear, and yes I do trailer and ride alot in town over busy city streets, over bridges and through parks.
I was sitting waiting for the light and a city buss pulled right up 2 feet from his nose, the doors openned with a switch and the driver asked if I needed a lift?? We both laughed and do you know the horse never moved a muscle. That is the unexpected, the horse just accepts since |I am always pulling things like that on him.

Don't accept anything but perfection. I also beleive every horse has it in him if only he could get his rider to figure that out.:lol::lol:
 

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My horse had never gone under a highway bridge before until a CTR at the Biltmore Estates...needless to say I got off and we walked under it twice. There are none in my area to practice with, so it was interesting to say the least.

We have an underpass that crosses 5 lanes of highway. It is low, clears the saddle fine but the horse must keep his head down. Suprisingly it has never caused a problem. Horses seem to take to it fine but you must get off and lead. It is dark with only light from each end.
I once took my horse into my office at the university. Through a man door, down the hall and right into the office.:lol:
 

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That's exactly it MacabreMikolaj. I do not settle for anything except perfection. I know what it is like to ride a horse as discribed and every horse I start I have those goals in mind. In the beginning I plan his route to incorporate challenges and I overwhelm him with experience right off the bat. In his first week he is running into all sorts of things, scary things that he has to overcome but in short order nothing nothing bothers him.

I was sitting at a light waiting for the cross walk sign to appear, and yes I do trailer and ride alot in town over busy city streets, over bridges and through parks.
I was sitting waiting for the light and a city buss pulled right up 2 feet from his nose, the doors openned with a switch and the driver asked if I needed a lift?? We both laughed and do you know the horse never moved a muscle. That is the unexpected, the horse just accepts since |I am always pulling things like that on him.


Don't accept anything but perfection. I also beleive every horse has it in him if only he could get his rider to figure that out.:lol::lol:
I totally agree with this statement...it's interesting, people who have grown up in different eras definitely believe different things. People do the same thing with their kids...not so much the "perfection" thing, but letting them get away with things that they shouldn't and then defending their parenting. I'm kind of a hard *** for my age, I call it like I see it and I agree with most everything you say. Hard work and high expectations are the only way to achieve the things you want in life.
 

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We have an underpass that crosses 5 lanes of highway. It is low, clears the saddle fine but the horse must keep his head down. Suprisingly it has never caused a problem. Horses seem to take to it fine but you must get off and lead. It is dark with only light from each end.
I once took my horse into my office at the university. Through a man door, down the hall and right into the office.:lol:
Yep he would lead anywhere. There was just no way that I could have ridden him under safely. I would have loved to see the look on people's faces. :lol: We ride ours into a tobacco barn at Land Between the Lakes and depending on the horse the rider may have to duck or the rider may have to lay down on their neck going under. I have never had mine refuse or even look twice. It makes for a good picture.
 

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I totally agree with this statement...it's interesting, people who have grown up in different eras definitely believe different things. People do the same thing with their kids...not so much the "perfection" thing, but letting them get away with things that they shouldn't and then defending their parenting. I'm kind of a hard *** for my age, I call it like I see it and I agree with most everything you say. Hard work and high expectations are the only way to achieve the things you want in life.

I agree. My parents expected the highest from me, and I have done ok so far. My grades were expected to be "A"s and some "B"s because they knew that was the level I could achieve. My younger siblings have different expectations based on their own achievements. If I did something wrong I had to deal with the consequences....
 

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You know, if everyone just expected a little more and stopped worrying about poor little hurt feelings so much, this world would be a much better place. People have become so bloody terrified to open their mouths or do anything that can be construed as "abusive", we have children and animals running around like hooligans with absolutely zero respect or fear of consequence. These same creatures grow up to be powerful and dangerous animals that risk the lives of everyone - it's no dang different with children.

Under 75% was "failing" in my house :lol: The consequence was that dark Daddy stare of disgust and failure glowing from his eyes and I swear to god, at 24 years old, it's still enough to make me jump through hoops!

My specific goal with my horses is this - if I died tomorrow, would anybody be bothered wanting them? Or are they going to be so full of unmanageable and ridiculous quirks that they find a quick road to a slaughter plant? I expect my animals to behave regardless of who is handling them, and I firmly believe both animals AND children must be raised with the same firm hand. In all the respect I have for my parents, I think their fantastic parenting abilities show up best in the fact that I don't falter from being a polite and productive member of society even when I'm away from them. Animals should be the same way. Life is going to be a LOT harder for both animal and child when they're not discipined properly as youngsters. The hard lessons are a LOT harsher as adults.
 

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Don't accept anything but perfection. I also beleive every horse has it in him if only he could get his rider to figure that out.:lol::lol:
I do not expect perfection from a living, breathing, thinking entity. I also do not believe that every horse has it in them. Some are not there 100% mentally or physically - just as their human companions are not.

I allow for mistakes. I would sure hope my horses allow for them too.

I ride with no contact through the reins. My legs are relaxed, not gripping the horse and the reins have a droop in them. I do not ride with contact and my hand and arm are relaxed but centered. Centered means my hand and I usually ride one handed is perfectedly centered over the withers. Any movement of my hand off center gets the horse turning to recenter my hand. So if there is no further contact the horse will just follow the
trail making the turns as they come up on his own. No input means the horse follows the trail and if that trail takes me home so be it.
That is not saying your reins lay on the horses neck.
 

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I once took my horse into my office at the university. Through a man door, down the hall and right into the office.:lol:
I find that difficult to believe. Not that you could get a horse to do it, but that your university gives people (other than senior administrators and football coaches) offices big enough to get a horse into :)
 

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I find that difficult to believe. Not that you could get a horse to do it, but that your university gives people (other than senior administrators and football coaches) offices big enough to get a horse into :)
My horse often came and went from the barn through a man door. He is totally use to it so entering the university is no problem whatever. Once in the building the halls are big and concrete so I just walked him down the hall into my lab, again a big concrete floored room. My office is fairly large and I didn't acutally go right in the room but then decided to go into the machine shop to visit a friend who is also a horse person. Yes we walked into the machine shop but my friend hearing the clip clop of the horse came running out of his office:lol::lol:
The horse could care less about where I take him. We sure got alot of looks.:lol::lol:

It was just something stupid to do that harmed no one.
 

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I find that difficult to believe. Not that you could get a horse to do it, but that your university gives people (other than senior administrators and football coaches) offices big enough to get a horse into :)

My office is 10 x 20 . A nice large office but no window view.
 

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That is not saying your reins lay on the horses neck.
Any time one rides with the reins in one hand with slack the reins are actually making contact with both sides of the neck. while the point where the 2 reins touch is not laying on the neck and a good part is touching the neck. No the reins are not actually laying on the neck and since my reins are 7 or 8 foot long individual reins they can never be laid on the neck for any length of time.
 
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