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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
do you all who have some time spent keeping , riding , training horses have any tidbits of advice to pass on? things that maybe no one told you about, but you just happened upon them and they are really handy things to know?

here's an example:

ALWAYS bring a halter and lead with you when you go out to the pasture, even if it's just to say a quick hello to your hrose and feed a carrot and give a scratch.

Why? because
1. you never know when you might encounter a horse out there who is colicing or needs to be brought back up to the barn for help.

2. even if you do not need to catch your horse, if he sees you with a halter every time you are there, both for when you just bring love and treats, and for the times that you catch him and work him, he will not associate the halter with work only.


now, do you have any neat little "Martha Stewart" ideas for us?
 

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I got one! :)

1. Always bring a hoof pick on the trail. Why? Because you never know if your horse will get a stone stuck in his/her hoof.

2. Try to keep a pocket knife/sharp object on you while you're at the barn, riding, on the trail, etc. Why? You never know if you're going to need to cut yourself (or your horse) out of something.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I learned to always take a halter after TWICE catching a horse , out on the lower 30 acres, colicking all by it's lonesome.

the other aspect of it, the making catching easier , is not an issue for me, since I never have trouble catching. but it might help some of the folks here who say once their horse catches sight of the halter, he plays hard to get.
 

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Okay I'm going to try my best!

1. Leaf blowers make cleaning the barn aisle and cobwebs out SO much easier! Why? Easy to start, fast clean up, and easy to put away!

2. Always have ample amounts of baling twine because it fixes almost anything in a pinch. Why? For instance, you can tie up a loose board until you can get tools out there to fix it, make a halter in an emergency, the list can go on.

If I think of more I'll post them.
 

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"A place for everything and everything in its' place."

At the pro barns where I work, everyone has to follow this rule. People get assigned different tasks and different horses at times. They have to be able to find the equipment they need. Whether it's for grooming, first aid, or taking out for exercise.

At one barn, if someone doesn't do this, they will get spoken to and if it continues they get fired. At two other barns, there will be an embarrassing/good natured consequence.

Even at the barn where some of us keep our personal horses, we follow this. If I send out one of my kids or co-workers to do something with one of mine, the supplies they will need have to be where I tell them they will be.

3x5 file box - At every barn with the horse name, a description, vet and farrier contact, and tack used.

Communication board - At every barn, with paper, pencils, and magnetic clips for the times when the dry erase markers are frozen. :) Lets everyone know who bought what or what is needed or any issues that arise before they become problems. Med issues and schedule are noted. If something happens to the person responsible, we don't have to track down a vet in the evening or on a holiday.
 

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The best thing for shows are rolling bins with three tubs for items you need frequently, regular large tubs to keep sheets and wraps clean in, and open baskets for your grooming supply bottles and things needed to be kept upright.

Pepi spray is not only great for your horse, but is a quick boot shine that helps repel dirt from your boots.

Shapley's black spray works as a healthier alternative to black hoof polish.

Always keep a supply of alligator clips, bungee cords, and zip ties.

99 cent table cloths from the dollar store make excellent stall drapes in a pinch.

White shop rags in bulk are an invaluable investment for a show horse. When spray products are not allowed in the warm up pen, spray down a rag and keep it in your pocket for when you get there to wipe down your horse.

A piece of chalk is a great way to quickly whiten stains.

:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The best thing for shows are rolling bins with three tubs for items you need frequently, regular large tubs to keep sheets and wraps clean in, and open baskets for your grooming supply bottles and things needed to be kept upright.

Pepi spray is not only great for your horse, but is a quick boot shine that helps repel dirt from your boots.

Shapley's black spray works as a healthier alternative to black hoof polish.

Always keep a supply of alligator clips, bungee cords, and zip ties.

99 cent table cloths from the dollar store make excellent stall drapes in a pinch.

White shop rags in bulk are an invaluable investment for a show horse. When spray products are not allowed in the warm up pen, spray down a rag and keep it in your pocket for when you get there to wipe down your horse.

A piece of chalk is a great way to quickly whiten stains.

:)
those are great!!! I love the white chalk idea. and shop rags! I love having plenty of rags for life in general

but, could you explain the things that I bolded. believe it or not, I don't know what a stall drape is, or the other items.
 

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always separate your saddle pad from your saddle after a ride and lay it upside down on top of your saddle or other saddle rack/surface. it helps it dry better and you won't have damp saddle pad squished under/next to leather sitting there in the tack room.

keep a roll of toilet paper in your tack locker. you never know when you might need it. i can't remember how many times i've been at the barn in the winter in the past and my nose starts to run/sniffle and for the life of me i don't have anything around to wipe/blow it! nowadays, that roll of tp sits ready to use.

hair brushes from the dollar store work great for manes and tails, and cost way less than what you will find at the tack store.

those big plastic 'claw' type hair clips work great for holding an unfitted fleece cooler together under the chin of a horse.

golf towels, you know the long rectangular ones that come with a clip and a grommet on one end that hang off golf club bags? they are great for uses around the barn. not too big but big enough, and they have an easy hang handle built right in. i keep two hanging on my locker and use them often - wiping down wet legs, getting that last bit of dust off my horse's coat, wiping down bits/tack after use, drying off after my horse snorts a nose-full all over me......... lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I would assume anyone would know the thing about the saddle pad, but the others are great!

where we are, there is no toilet nearby, so I always keep tp handy if I need to go out in the "woods" . A stall will do fine for a quick pee, though.
 

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1. Always bring a hoof boot (or two) on long trail rides. Why? your (or someones) horse throws a shoe, you need a "spare tire".
2. Bring short sections of garden hose on the trail too. Why? because if a horse gets bitten by a snake, you shove the hose in his nose so he can still breath if he starts to swell up.
3. Leave a halter on when ever you ride off the property. You never know when you will need to stop and be able to tie your horse (I stop and chat with people, or something happens and someone needs help you can just tie your horse up by the reins, halters come in handy lol)

I will have more but im brain dead ATM 0.o
 

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I'm an 'everything in its place' type. I hate having to hunt for a manure fork or something else that should be easily had.

I have an emergency kit in a small tool box that has scissors, wraps, cotton pads and little travel bottles, that I bought at the dollar store, of medical cleansers, etc. This way, when there is an emergency, I don't have to hunt for this stuff in my tack shed. All I do is grab my 'medical bag' and go!

On the trail, I also have a medical bag. I learned the hard way one day when my horse lodged a hind leg in a hole. When he pulled it out he had nicked an artery and was squirting blood. I had nothing to staunch it. Now I have medical supplies in a freezer baggie in my saddle bag. Also have added a sling for a human. Learned that from experience as well. Last fall, someone in our group was dumped and broke her wrist. Thank goodness I had a jean shirt that we could use as a make shift sling.
 

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Learn your horses' vitals and make it a habit to check them on a regular basis, as well as listening to their sides daily and weight taping them monthly. Why? That way you may catch a troubling change in condition or health early. Sometimes these things escape unnoticed, because people don't see the small things when seeing their horse every day! It is also a good idea to take a conformation picture and hoof pictures of your horse once a month and keep them in a separate folder - again, a good way to see any unwanted changes.

Never forget your cellphone when out in trails or just riding alone, or even when just going to the pastures - and keep it close to your body, not in a saddle bag. Why? I think this one doesn't need an explanation. ;) Emergencies may happen everywhere.

A simple fleece blanket from a dollar store and an elastic surcingle can help you in case of shortage in...well, fleece blankets.

Always keep a headlight with fresh batteries in the barn. Helps tremendously in case of power outage or a need to check out a fence/horse in unlit pastures.
 

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1 - Swimming pool nets work well for cleaning hay & goop out of a water trough. In Arizona, the cleaner the water trough, the less algae that grows in it - and the horses seem to prefer a clean one, too.

2 - My horses are barefoot, and the hoof picks I've got don't get into the the line of the frog to clean it out well - most are too wide. ("The frog has two lines (called commissures) on each side of it helping to establish the beginning of the sole from the beginning of the frog") I've started using a medium, flathead screwdriver. Held sideways, it gets in to clean any old manure out and it removes rocks better than any store-bought hoof pick I've tried. My horses notice the difference.

3 - A multi-tool instead of a hoof pick on a trail helps if you need to pull cactus spines out of a horse's leg, and also cleans out rocks with the screwdriver part. Or, in southern Arizona, carry some pliers along just in case...
 

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I have a bag in my car with first aid kit, tissues, wet wipes, ibuprofen, antihistamine, sunscreen, hat, jacket, raincoat etc in it for when I go out to see our pony. Does that count? It comes in handy in our changeable weather and with my horrendous hay fever !
 

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I like to use a shoe bag for small bottles, shampoo, etc, and when I had it hanging in the open, I hung the spray bottles (by the spray handles ) on it.

If you can find the mesh ones, they are easier to wash out.

Great in the trailer, too.

A small towel bar works fo rthe spray bottles, too.

Nancy
 

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Always keep some halters somewhere away from your barn or stables in case of fire - the ones inside might be burning or too hot to touch
I always carry some baler twine in my pockets when I ride out - so many uses for that stuff - and a pocket knife to cut it with
We used to carry wire cutters with us in the UK as farmers used to tie gates on bridle tracks up with barbed wire
 
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