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I own a Quarter Horse gelding and have owned him for under a year but I'm still have a lot of trouble with his trotting and transitions.

Trot: He has his head in the air and it's always extremely rushed and near impossible to sit or rise to. It got better after I really worked him in it, half halting him until he nearly walked and then letting him go again. He would go good for a bit then fall back into his fast trot. I then did lot's of figures of eight which really seemed to help, he got a lot better again but then once again fell back into his old habits.

I started lunging him over trot poles and he seemed to work better and I'm now going to lunge him before I ride because that seems to help a bit. But is there any other advice you can give me?

Transitions: His walk to trot is alright, but his trot to canter is horrible. He goes into this disgusting fast trot before falling into his canter. Once cantering he's fine though, a bit bumpy but fine. Canter to trot is even worse, I've nearly come off so many times. He slows right down in his canter before just collapsing into that fast trot.

How can I fix this?

Thanks~!
 

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Walk to trot -
Well first of all, focus mainly on getting your walk perfect before trotting or cantering. Get him to drop the bit by doing a simple 4 stage exercise:
1) Close your calves around the horse to create a foreward movement.
2) Close your outside hand to recieve and contain the movement created.
3) At the same time, give three or four little squeezes with inside hand to maintain an inside bend, as the pressure from the outside hand may cause him to bend to the outside.
4) After three seconds, relax and go back to maintenance level of pressure from hand and leg.

Then once you feel him soften towards the contact, try a transition to trot. Make it clear and snappy.
He may be raising his head because of several reasons. Film yourself, or get someone to watch you in trot and try and spot what you may be doing wrong.
Are you bumping around, causing discomfort for him?
Are you pulling on his mouth?
Have you had all the usual back and teeth checks?

Hope that makes sense!
 

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It could also help him if he builds up some back muscle. I had a gelding that would get fast at the trot and rough at the canter and had awful problems with upward transitions and breaking every spring after he'd had a good bit of the winter to get flabby. After we did a lot of hill work, and got some muscle built back up everything else fell back into place. I agree, make sure he hasn't got any physical problems first, and that you aren't giving him mixed signals or causing pain, but then the best solution is work, work, work, lots of transitions, circles, hills. I personally would hold off on cantering a lot until you get the trot down pat.
 

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Sounds like he cannot find his balance. Assuming your saddle fits correctly and balances you correctly in it, go out and trail ride or play around in a hilly field for a few weeks. Even at a walk, the ups and downs of the terrain will help build up his center of balance like no ring work can match. He'll probably trip and stumble through his first few rides, but just take it slow. You'll feel the change quickly once he figures out where to put his feet.
 

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If your saddle is too narrow and pinches his shoulders, that can cause a head up, rough trot.

Not saying that is the problem in this case, but at least consider your saddle fit just in case that is the problem. Maybe if someone has another saddle you could borrow for a few rides, you could see if his trot is the same or if he moves better in a saddle that is a little wider or has more "flare" to the bars.

I've had a lot of trouble with saddle fit because my Mustang is so wide. But I finally got a really good saddle that fits him. :)
 
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