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Betsy, I'm not sure if I can post this link but check this out:

The Dressage Foundation : The Century Club : Join the Century Club

This is a club for dressage rider and horses with a combined age of 100 or more! There are tons of people in it, so don't let your age discourage you. I read articles all the time about people who didn't start riding until their 60's, and there are 3 people at my barn well into their 70s who are still riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #142
I had a gentleman call me to book some riding lessons, he was in his mid seventies.

He had ridden a bit as a child and wanted to take it up again.

He did fine, had him out Foxhunting within a year. Made my day as he was a retired Naval Chaplain, never taught a galloping vicar before!
 

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Lot's of information and opinions in this thread! I only read the first three pages and kinda skimmed the rest, so forgive me if something like this has already been said.

Apart from the money and the trainers and reading about what it takes to own, ride or train a horse, I think many people over look what horses actually are without people. I have learned so much about my horse by reading about wild horses in asia, by watching documentaries or reading a nat geo magazine. Horses were (and many still are) wild animals with their own set of rules and peculiarities.

Knowing as much as you can about them and how they behaive without human interference will never be harmful in my opinion. I'm sure there are plenty that know, again it may have already been mentioned so forgive me if this is just repeating.

Im not saying you NEED these things, but for the people that haven't thought about it or tried it, going back to basics (true wild untamed basics) can be more enlightening then one might imagine. If for nothing else, it's fun to know!

I also love reading about horses in history and how they were used, though that's more for my own nerdiness then for my skill set.

I'm off to read more posts!
 

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I have had several clients like you and yes! this can definitely be done-you'll have a blast!

My (late comer) clients have taken lessons for a while, both in riding and in all aspects of horse care and handling. You need to find a good and understanding trainer who is not all about showing. It would be helpful to get involved in a good, somewhat casual stable all the while planning to board your future new horse there, at least for a while. With friendly helpful co-boarders, you won't be left on your own when issues arise (as they invariably do!). Some of my clients have eventually moved their horses to their own place but not until they felt confident in their "horsekeeping" abilities.

The first thing you do is find a non-show oriented instructor who is eager to teach you from A to Z and start learning.

In all honesty, my older clients (one couple was in their 70s when they started!) have been the most fun to teach and help. After some basic lessons, I was able to find sound, quiet, safe horses for them so that they could learn on their own horses and then strike out on their own.
 

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I've been riding for 8 years and I've never been able to get a horse of my own because of where we live. We are finally able to move by next year at the latest and my parents said once we move after a month or so (we will be moving to a place with land) I'll be able to get a horse!! So, I was wondering, does anyone have any tips for a first horse? Thanks!!!
What should I do, I might be able to lease this arab Geo who I love, but it's $400 a month plus vet and farrier bills, I can afford this but it's not even a full lease. I can ride him whenever as long as one of the trainers are there (just for safety reasons) but he'd be used as a lesson horse still, I don't know many people at the barn, I can't take him to my house once we do move until the lease time (6-8 months) is up then he'd be my horse. Also I had planned to go to this barn just for the winter since my usual place I go to is an out door place and it's been to cold to ride so I then couldn't get lessons from there. What should I do?!
 

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Recommended Books for Beginners

Hey!
I am 25 years of age with 18 years of experiece with horses. I would advise the any book is good to read before buying or loaning a horse BUT I would highly recommend the BHS stage 1 & 2 books. You can revise and complete an exam for a qualification, but you dont have too.... you can just buy the book to read!

They are full of knowledge from the word go and show how to put each task imto practise.

Good luck! :runninghorse2:

Hope this helps,
Lisa Whimperley
 

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I've loved reading this thread. It's good to know there are so many depth-learners out there! I'm one too. I have my first lesson in 30 years tomorrow and I've been online all week!
 

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Personally, I have never been a fan of leasing. If something goes wrong there are gray areas as to who is responsible for costs. If you are paying for the lease, it is never paid off. And so often on here I see people say 'I'm not allowed to do this or that, or only if BO is there'.

You buy a horse, it's your decisions your responsibility your costs, no question.

That is just my take.
 

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Discussion Starter #149
J too am no fan of leasing nor am I a fan of allowing a horse to go out on trial.

If I am selling a horse then a potential buyer can have any trial they like from my place but the horse will not leave the property unless it is paid for.

I will not 'hold' a horse for someone unless they pay a deposit on it. Anyone coming up with the money and is a suitable future owner, gets the horse.

It is all to easy for a buyer to say they are very interested, you turn down other potential buyers and then those that were interested never let you know they have found another horse.
 

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Something I learned when doing my homework is be cautious about adopting a horse, instead of buying one. Sometimes the person who's adopting the horse out will not let you have the papers that belong to that horse, they'll keep them. You can own that horse until it dies, but won't have its paper work. It keeps that horse out of the show ring. If you want to show your horse you won't be able to.

I am new to horses, very new. I already know two years is not enough time for me to be a confident horse owner. I am not planning on getting a horse until five years from now. But even then, not sure if owning a horse myself will be right for me or not. And still going to need a ton of help, even if I manage to learn a whole heck of a lot in five years. What matters more is what's best for the horse, not what's best for me. Same with any animal. If I have doubts about what kind of owner I am going to be, don't do it. Keep learning. And if at the end of my rope, when I feel I've learned a whole lot, if I still have doubts, don't do it.
 
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I don't think you need to wait that long Kyleen. Once you are confident handling and riding and dealing with minor issues there is no reason not to get your own horse. The main thing is to have reliable contacts - vet, farrier, feed merchant, and a good mate to bounce ideas off would be useful. But mainly a trainer that you work with regularly to keep you improving and nip any bad habits in the bud (yours and the horse).
 
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As for being a new person and being able to afford a horse, here's the run down.

My budget for buying two EXCELLENT horses: $20,000 for two horses.
Replace barbed wire fences and put in top grade steel: $60,000 for 40 acres (and even then the company who gave me this quote I'm still doing background checks on to make sure they're good.. this quote includes all my security gates and features I want put in, and the dividers for each pastor.. it comes with some fancy stuff, including a front gate camera so I can authorize who's allowed in, who's not)
My dream barn with all the bells and whistles I am wanting $80,000 - $100,000
Emergency F-5 tornado safe barn: $50,00 for five stalls
Yearly medical expenses, not including emergencies: $5,000
Emergency funds set aside for emergency medical expenses: $10,000
Farrier: $2,000 a year
Legal fees: $300 to draw up basic paper work that I can keep around the barn, have people sign
Insurance costs for the first year: $5,000 (Includes liability for dumb people who don't listen when I say keep away from the barn and horses)
New trailer: $10,000 - $15,000 for a two horse with closed tack, and bumper hitch (And that's calling in an owed favor to someone who does it for a living)
New truck - with the trade in on my car: $30,000
Land repairs: $30,000 - This is to repair all the deep holes the tornado put into my land from ripping trees out, to level the area out, put down new grass, to rip out the old stuff broken stuff, put in the new, including someone that knows about horses getting rid of toxic trees and plants anywhere near me

A lot of these prices I have rounded up quite a bit, because when going though all this, problems always pop up and more money is needed to fix the problem sometimes. But yeah I am having to think long, long and deep about how much I am wanting a horse when looking at these numbers. Do I really want to finish paying the death taxes on my inheritance, then spend it this way? I know my great grandma would be thrilled. She loved horses. She would be proud of me for doing it this way, as well as keeping a garden around. But doesn't mean it's a good fit for me! I'm having to think REALLY hard about it..
 

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Well I wasn't starting from the point of you knowing nothing, I thought you said you had done a couple of years. You should have learnt something in that time, or look at getting a new trainer. I would guess the 80% of people on this site don't have anywhere near the money you have to throw at their horses/land etc and it does not make them worse owners. When I get my horse I will be doing it on a budget and I am prepared to give up some things to have one. Its not about all the bells and whistles, its about confidence and support. I have ridden off and on for years and I will certainly be looking for a trainer to sort out the bad habits that have crept in.
 
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Na I was saying that I know now already that in even two years time from now, it won't be enough. I'm as raw as I can get!! >.< Not the most eloquent person, but I try.

Yeah and that doesn't even include the costs of getting the pipes out to the barn so it has hot water, my trainers, ect. Of course I want those things too. I figured that was a no-brainier. >.< I guess I should mention it, considering this thread is for new people like me. Of course I want the best for my horse!

I have my reasons for wanting the bells n whistles. But I'd rather have a well behaved horse with good training, good medical background, a good trainer and a good support team.. Of course... Just wanted to give people who are in the same situation I am in an idea how much it'll cost to get started. Don't have to have AS MUCH stuff as I want put in. But then again, most people may not be building their homes on-site like I am either. Depends on the individual. But it gives them an idea of what things to look into...
 

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We would all like to have the bells and whistles, but the reality is some of us don't. Just saying they're not needed and I would rather have a horse now to learn with and bells and whistles later. But you can have it all and I wish for you the best.
 

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I put the cost of any trainer I might need into the cost of my horses.. And pray it's enough. >.< I know someone who's a good horse trainer. His fees are $800 a month! >.< Most horses won't cost $10,000 each. But round up! Round up! Round up! Extra expenses! >.< If you've money left over, great! Invest!
 

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All that is just a reference of things to look in on. Do you have to do all that? No. But it's something for new people to think about.

What if you have a horse that has an abscess and need hot water? Where you going to truck the hot water in from? Where you going to wash our tack at?

Do you have security issues like I do? Is it necessary in your area to put in added security measures? Even if it is a nice area, remote areas are often times a thieves playground... Make it hard for them if possible! Other ways to do it. But for me, with my kids on-site, I'm being a bit more picky!

Thirty horses in my area, here in Oklahoma, have recently been stolen from their owners, from the owners own barns, as the owner slept at night.. For me, that's lessened learned. Added security it is! It'll take longer, cost a lot more money, and keep me from buying a horse for longer years than I would like, but so be it.
 
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