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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have never seen anything like it... 0_o Nor did I ever think I would!





I think that the person that invented this has never ridden a horse? Or at least, never seen a horse bolt uncontrollably or go up and over on someone?

Pulliter | Equipona
 

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I generally am in favor of safer tack...but I'd rather be emasculated than be seen in something like that! :shock::shock::shock:
 

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When Vince tripped and fell at the canter, I'm glad I was able to get out from under him - if I had been wearing a harness like that - he would have crushed me to death.
 

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My first thought is that anyone needing a device like this to stay on their horse should be working on their balance and seat (and possibly the horse's training?) before trying to jump like pictured.

As a device for therapy riders? Maybe with supervision. For regular riding? No way. A loose or broken girth means you could easily be trapped in a saddle that is no longer attached to the horse properly...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've seen versions of that for handicapped children at riding centers. Beyond that, I can't imagine it being safe.
I have never thought of that. Yes, I suppose in that case, great. But they are trying to market it to trainers etc ??

scary.
 

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According to the info on it there's a really fast automatic emergency release built into it if the horse falls - not sure I'd want to put all my trust in that though
 

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Call me crazy but I actually like knowing I can get away from my horse if the need arises. That's just me though. I also don't put alot of faith the automatic fail safe type stuff.
 

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Apparently it knows if the horse falls and frees you. There's also an optional remote control for someone on the ground to be able to free you. It seems like they tried to cover all bases with it, but to me it just sounds like more things that can malfunction and trap you. More trouble than it's worth IMO. Plus, I think it would really hinder the learning of balance and having a proper seat. The possibility of falling off is awfully good motivation to learn how to ride correctly!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I know they have built in automatic release but electronics have never served me well so I am not going to trust it with my life!
 

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Things that just make ya go hmm....

I personally wouldn't want to ride in one, I don't see how it would actually keep me in the saddle and not just dangling there? I saw a video on the site of a guy preforming a theatrical fall, horse goes down and everything, and he gets away just fine. What about bucking fits etc though? A weak riders legs would still be flailing and they'd be stuck to the horse and getting whip lash?

Also for therapy riders, yes this may keep them on, but they already generally stay at a walk and short bouts of a slow trot right? There will always be the need for handlers on the ground in therapy riding so why strap a child in?
 

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Actually, as long as there is a safety release, I can see how this can be beneficial to a handful of riders. My friend has MS her balance is fair. She has a trouble holding her horse in the running walk for long amounts of time. She frequently needs to stop and readjust her self now. Where will she be in 5 years from now? My hope she'll still be riding like she is now. Reality says otherwise though. It's possible she be lucky if she can ride at a walk. Something like this could really prolong the amount of time she is able to ride.
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I don't know enough about MS but I would imagine your friend SlideStop is readjusting out of pain? Not sure this device could help with that. Apparently this device isn't supposed to impede a rider at all which makes me think it's not supportive, as in helping you keep a position, either?

I feel for your friend though, I cannot imagine having such a disease and having it affect not only my passion but my daily life in such a profound way.
 

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I don't know enough about MS but I would imagine your friend SlideStop is readjusting out of pain? Not sure this device could help with that. Apparently this device isn't supposed to impede a rider at all which makes me think it's not supportive, as in helping you keep a position, either?

I feel for your friend though, I cannot imagine having such a disease and having it affect not only my passion but my daily life in such a profound way.
No, pain isn't the reason she needs to stop, though pain and MS go hand and hand. MS severely effects your balance. For example my friend cannot ride with two hands since she needs the other to balance, losing a stirrup could spell disaster for her and she won't close her eyes while riding. If her MS got really bad and her balance became terrible a device like this could help her stay on if her horse trips or spooks. While it might not be a big deal to us, for her a minor trip could mean she falls. If she falls that will create a whole ''nother slew of issues.
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For therapy, under supervision, it might be OK. But even there I wonder if a good-natured horse isn't a better answer. It looks to me like someone who started to slide off sideways would end up hung up hanging sideways until someone hit the release button. I personally would prefer an Australian-style saddle with an American horn and quick release stirrups...plus a caretaker horse.
 

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For therapy, under supervision, it might be OK. But even there I wonder if a good-natured horse isn't a better answer. It looks to me like someone who started to slide off sideways would end up hung up hanging sideways until someone hit the release button. I personally would prefer an Australian-style saddle with an American horn and quick release stirrups...plus a caretaker horse.
Her horse is amazing with her. Her spook just a quick freeze. Every once in a while she jump a tad to the side, but nothing extreme. There is no bolt, buck or rear in there. I had my mother ride her and I'd trust her with any beginner.

Would you, or anyone else, be willing to give up horses if you have a balance issues? I'd do everything in my power to keep riding and I'm sure most of us would. The joy and physical therapy she gets from horses will be well worth the risk.
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^^ My reference was to the device that holds a person in the saddle. It doesn't look like it would hold a person on who is falling off sideways, which could then result in serious injury. Maybe my mind would change if I saw it in action. Just looking at pictures, it looks like a sideways slip would result in the rider being pinned to the side of the horse, which would be incredibly dangerous.

And yes, if I had serious balance issues, I might give up riding. It would depend on how serious those issues were, and what horse was available to me. I certainly would NOT ride Mia that way...she isn't a bad horse, but she figures staying in the saddle is my responsibility. There is no 'care-taker' in Mia's blood. OTOH, I'm pretty sure Trooper would try very hard to stay under my youngest daughter at all cost.

If I continue to get older, there will come a day where I won't be able to ride. It might be 20 years from now, or more, but it will come unless death intervenes.
 

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For therapy, under supervision, it might be OK. But even there I wonder if a good-natured horse isn't a better answer. It looks to me like someone who started to slide off sideways would end up hung up hanging sideways until someone hit the release button. I personally would prefer an Australian-style saddle with an American horn and quick release stirrups...plus a caretaker horse.
I completely agree with all of this. My biggest fear is that this device would leave a rider who does not have the strength to pull themselves up dangling off the horse sideways. Stationary horse at that point or not, I've been in the unfortunate position of climbing off a horse head first and it's off putting.

I cannot truly speak to if I would give up riding if my balance was compromised as I am not in that position. I would guess that I would give it up. Riding, even a sane quiet horse, requires so much balance and if the chances of a fall were increased and the damage a fall could cause was elevated by an ailment then I feel I would realistically have to find another way to be around horses. The answer to that question is different for everyone though. I'm a "wuss"- I hate the thought of falling, wear a helmet to ward off brain injury and question my choice to ride because of the dangers often but I know I'm unique in that.
 
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