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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so last night I bought a tetnus vaccine that was 1500 units. That's all it said on the bottle..no ML's so I called the vet to make sure I was going to vaccinate my horse correctly and this is what I get for buying a vial from a store with teenagers that work there...they gave me a vial of tentus antitoxin.....I found out that that was to help cure it instead of prevent it. I am sooo glad I asked the vet or else something bad may have happened. I'm a little upset because I trusted the people and i am new to all the vaccines and have had a lot of help from people but then this happened...blah.
 

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Thank goodness you checked! You MUST always check OTC medicines and prescriptions. The people who handle those things are just that, people, and have their "days," too, just like we all do.
 

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Not the answer you will want to hear but, if you are that unaware you should probably leave vaccination to the vet. There is nothing wrong with DIY vaccination (grew up with it being the norm for our animals) but that only applies to those who know what they are doing.
 

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Actually, anti-toxin does come with some serious risks.

"There is a disease syndrome called “serum hepatitis” that affects horses. This is a very rare event and is linked to administration of equine serum origin products. About 20% of horses with idiopathi (unknown cause) acute hepatic disease (IAHD) show clinical signs of liver failure (anorexia, lethargy, jaundice) within 4 – 10 weeks after receiving an equine origin biologic – hence the name “serum” hepatitis 1. One of the most common equine serum origin products used in the field today is tetanus antitoxin. Many other equine serum products, including normal horse plasma, have also been linked to serum hepatitis 2, 3, 4. This link between equine serum origin products and hepatitis has been well documented for almost 90 years 6. The cause of serum hepatitis is not known 2, 5. As mentioned earlier, it is a very rare event (incidence is ~1:500,000 doses sold - based on Colorado Serum data), but “outbreaks” 1, 4 have been reported every few years with multiple horses in the same and sometimes different geographic areas involved. Some horses will develop hepatitis having never received an equine serum product before 1, 5. Some toxic plants, moldy corn and blue-green algae can also cause hepatitis 1. There is not an equine specific virus that causes hepatitis and there has been no causative agent identified in cases of serum hepatitis despite repeated attempts to do so 2, 5. Attempts to transmit the disease experimentally have also failed 2, 4, 5. The most plausible causative explanation/theory is a type III hypersensitivity reaction 1, 7 which is a type of allergic reaction where antigen-antibody complexes form in the liver which results in hepatitis and has a mortality rate of 50 – 83% once symptoms begin....Tetanus antitoxin is usually a very safe biologic that has its place in the equine world, but its use, like all biologics, is not without risk and serum hepatitis is a unique and very rare risk associated with equine serum products. For this reason it is wise for horse owners and veterinarians to be aware of these risk factors when using biologics and to understand when tetanus antitoxin is indicated vs. a tetanus toxoid booster. "--Randall J Berrier, DVM

Definitely if you are having to rely on feed store employees to pick your vaccines for you then you shouldn't be purchasing vaccines yourself. There is too much risk for missing a vital vaccine or being given the wrong product. People who work in feed and farm supply stores don't necessarily (or often) have any more knowledge about vaccinations or basic medical care of your horse than you do.

If you want to cut your vet bills by not having exam or farm call charges, simply pick up the vaccines from your vet and administer them yourself. Then you still have a record at your vet's office as to when vaccines were given and what was given and you have your vet's professional advice on what to give and he and his staff know what they are giving you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually, anti-toxin does come with some serious risks.

"There is a disease syndrome called “serum hepatitis” that affects horses. This is a very rare event and is linked to administration of equine serum origin products. About 20% of horses with idiopathi (unknown cause) acute hepatic disease (IAHD) show clinical signs of liver failure (anorexia, lethargy, jaundice) within 4 – 10 weeks after receiving an equine origin biologic – hence the name “serum” hepatitis 1. One of the most common equine serum origin products used in the field today is tetanus antitoxin. Many other equine serum products, including normal horse plasma, have also been linked to serum hepatitis 2, 3, 4. This link between equine serum origin products and hepatitis has been well documented for almost 90 years 6. The cause of serum hepatitis is not known 2, 5. As mentioned earlier, it is a very rare event (incidence is ~1:500,000 doses sold - based on Colorado Serum data), but “outbreaks” 1, 4 have been reported every few years with multiple horses in the same and sometimes different geographic areas involved. Some horses will develop hepatitis having never received an equine serum product before 1, 5. Some toxic plants, moldy corn and blue-green algae can also cause hepatitis 1. There is not an equine specific virus that causes hepatitis and there has been no causative agent identified in cases of serum hepatitis despite repeated attempts to do so 2, 5. Attempts to transmit the disease experimentally have also failed 2, 4, 5. The most plausible causative explanation/theory is a type III hypersensitivity reaction 1, 7 which is a type of allergic reaction where antigen-antibody complexes form in the liver which results in hepatitis and has a mortality rate of 50 – 83% once symptoms begin....Tetanus antitoxin is usually a very safe biologic that has its place in the equine world, but its use, like all biologics, is not without risk and serum hepatitis is a unique and very rare risk associated with equine serum products. For this reason it is wise for horse owners and veterinarians to be aware of these risk factors when using biologics and to understand when tetanus antitoxin is indicated vs. a tetanus toxoid booster. "--Randall J Berrier, DVM

Definitely if you are having to rely on feed store employees to pick your vaccines for you then you shouldn't be purchasing vaccines yourself. There is too much risk for missing a vital vaccine or being given the wrong product. People who work in feed and farm supply stores don't necessarily (or often) have any more knowledge about vaccinations or basic medical care of your horse than you do.

If you want to cut your vet bills by not having exam or farm call charges, simply pick up the vaccines from your vet and administer them yourself. Then you still have a record at your vet's office as to when vaccines were given and what was given and you have your vet's professional advice on what to give and he and his staff know what they are giving you.


Thank you. I understand that it was my mistake after I thought about it a little more. I am glad I called the vet and he helped me and told me what to get so I can do it myself. I'm going to do the 4-way vaccination. I forgot the viruses name but it's common with race horses and it was going around at the stables so I vaccinated my horse. There was a lot of coughing going on and it was kinda serious so I got that done. I WILL FOR NOW ON call the vet and make sure that I get the right vaccines.

And yes, the tetnus antitoxin can cause harm. It even had precaution on it and said to administrate adrenaline because some horses have a reaction so it can have it's complications.


I apperciate your response.


I am doing school for vet assisting but it had not mentioned any of that information in my books.


Again,thank you.
 

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Wow! so glad you didn't give it to her! I do my own vaccines but I just inject them. I have the vet give them to me and if he doesn't have to inject them it costs less.
 

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Make sure that you keep track of which vaccine goes where (don't give them all in one spot) so that if she has a reaction, you know what vaccination it was to and you won't give that same one again (maybe try a different manufacturer or protocol in the future).
 
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