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Today I was told that I should stay away from buying a TB as they are expensive to buy and extremely expensive to keep because they have a lot of problems with there legs, back etc. Is this true? What are everyones experiences with TB's?

Pure bred dogs Ive heard get a lot more problems than a cross bred dog is this true also for horses?
Would it be best to try and find a cross breed rather than a pure breed horse? Are TB's good for jumping or should i look at other breeds? If so what breeds are best suited?
 

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Thoroughbreds are great horses. They tend to have a bit more energy than other horses, but there are exceptions to that. I have a 12 y/o grade TB gelding who was never raced and he has pretty low energy for a TB, but a bit higher than averages of other breeds I've worked with.
Horses who were raced seem to be more prone to health issues than unraced horses. With that said, my TB has had a few more issues than other horses I've had. For the most part I think this is due to his slightly higher energy level.
They're definitely great for jumping. They're very willing and intelligent horses with great stamina. My guy works as hard as he can at whatever I point him to.

What it comes down to is that with any horse you are interested in buying, it's best to have him vet checked or at least looked over by a professional. Always, always bring a trainer that knows your abilities and needs. A good trainer should also be able to see any obvious signs that a horse is prone to any kind of health issue..but a vet is best for that.
Try to avoid discriminating by breed. Just look for any horse that suits you and your needs: one that has the proper training, energy level, conformation, etc..and have a vet confirm that the horse is in good health.
 

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I have a TB and they are just the same amount to keep as any old breed. Yes, some can be energetic, but some, 110% Bombproof.
It can depend on weather they were raced, i have been told/read/seen.

:)
 

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Thoroughbreds are widely known to be hot horses, however I have met quite a few that you would never have known were Tb's. That being said, I do not think that you should get a Tb for a first(?) horse unless you find one that suits your abilities. Also, don't let anybody talk you out of a horse because of breed. I personally stick to mainly stock breeds, and don't particularly care for gaited breeds. However, I have nothing against them and if that's what you like then so be it, I respect the decision. Just not my cup of tea. Be sure to look for a horse that suits YOU, not somebody else's idea of what you should have. Look for temperament, training level, conformation, soundness, etc., before you look at the breed.
 

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I can share with you my experience with OTTB's just from last summer to now. Please note these were not my horses. They were not my fiance's horses. They were his brother and left in our care, we had to ask permission before doing anything for these horses care.

My fiance's brother races thoroughbred horses in Az. Over the summer he brought up 4 of them. Of the 4 of them, I rode 3. Of that three, 2 were really well broke and so laid back it wasn't funny. It was hard to imagine them as racing horses. I used them on the farm for trail riding, for local fun shows (barrels, poles, etc), for chasing our cattle. They were wonderful ride and up for anything you asked of them. I rode them maybe a handful of times over the summer.

As far as keeping, I will say that they were extremely hard to keep. Of the 4 that were here. 3 of them showed signs of losing weight and problems keeping weight on. Of the 3, 2 seemed worse than the others. We offered them not only free choice pasture, but hay as well, along with sweet feed, alfalfa pellets, oats, beet pulp, and a few suppliments. Of the 2, 1 had an old injury from the track that seemed to flair up big time while he was here. We had the vet out a few times to look at it. The vet's suggestion was that he was never going to walk correctly again combined with weight loss, to put him humanely to sleep. We thought as long as he was showing us he wanted to live, we would not choose that route. Unfortunately we think his heart gave out because he passed away unexpectedly one morning. Of the 3 that were left, 1 was taken back down to Az and months later passed away unexpectedly. (I do not know the circumstances behind this.)

That left us with the one that never had any problems and another hard keeper. It's taken MONTHS for her body to adapt to her new situation (and us alot of feed and vet bills) These two are now doing really well and are maintaining a good weight.

I would never want to own a thoroughbred. I am sure others could be different but this was my experience and I'd not want to do it agian.
 

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An experience with only four Thoroughbreds shouldn't be enough to change one's mind. My grandmother's best mare was a 25+ year old Tb. At the other end of the spectrum I knew an excellent open jumper/dressage mare but she was way too strong for beginners or even intermediate riders. In the same barn another one was so quiet you could throw the earliest beginners on him. It's not necessarily about breed, but the individual.
 

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Like I said..it was just my experience and my humble opinion.
 

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I've ridden a lot of TBs and OTTBs and I have to say they require a bit more finesse then other breeds. The OTTBs tend to be hotter then most horses because they are used to being grained up to their eyeballs and letting out their energy in explosive bursts down the track, but that doesn't mean you can't turn around and make that horse a nice Hunter, you just need to be patient and work on it.

I've found with my experience with the breed is that they are smart and brave. Excellent riding horses, with great personalities.

My horse isn't that hard to keep, the first year I was pumping a lot of hay in him but eventually his Metabolism adjusted to his new life and I feed him just as much as any other horse.

As far as care goes most of the TBs that we get from the track have a bow or other injury, (mine had a torn suspensory) but if you give them the time off and slowly bring them back they have NO Issues. My horse has poor feet but through proper nutrition and corrective shoeing he has had Zilch problems.

I recommend this book for anyone thinking of taking an OTTB who doesn't have much experience with them Beyond the Track
 

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I've ridden a lot of TBs and OTTBs and I have to say they require a bit more finesse then other breeds. The OTTBs tend to be hotter then most horses because they are used to being grained up to their eyeballs and letting out their energy in explosive bursts down the track, but that doesn't mean you can't turn around and make that horse a nice Hunter, you just need to be patient and work on it.

I've found with my experience with the breed is that they are smart and brave. Excellent riding horses, with great personalities.

My horse isn't that hard to keep, the first year I was pumping a lot of hay in him but eventually his Metabolism adjusted to his new life and I feed him just as much as any other horse.

As far as care goes most of the TBs that we get from the track have a bow or other injury, (mine had a torn suspensory) but if you give them the time off and slowly bring them back they have NO Issues. My horse has poor feet but through proper nutrition and corrective shoeing he has had Zilch problems.

I recommend this book for anyone thinking of taking an OTTB who doesn't have much experience with them Beyond the Track
I agree with this.

TBs and OTTBs can be excellent horses. They Excel at Eventing, Trail Riding, etc. I have an OTTB and I can tell you he's a handful, at 20 years old, he still keeps me on my toes.

They DO require a bit more work than most other breeds. Titan is not a horse that I could stick out in a pasture all winter and then expect him to be willing to want to ride first thing come spring. They are definitely more work than most. But than again, I've met OTTBs that are JUST off the track and you would never have known that this horse ONLY knew to just run the first 5 years of his/her life. Course, I've also known the OTTB that you HATED to go riding with becuase he was SURE to freak out the minute you walked past him:?. So they can go either way.

If you go to look at one, be sure to have your trainer with you to ride him too.

Good Luck!
 

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My first horse was a TB, he never raced, he was 8 when we bought him. i was 9, and he was one of the quietest horses ive ever met. he was born and raised at the race track, but he was to slow(haha) so the trainer boght him, thn me n my mom bought him. He was the pefect horse, never did anything REALLY wrong. I personally LOVE throughbreds, like others have said, i find them to be exteremely brave and smart. i sold him to a mom and daughter who had just began riding, he is loving his new home and they are loving him!

some thorougbreds are perfect for beginners,some arent. It all depends on the horse. My new hrose is hanoverian/thoroughbred... shes not a beginners horse, haha and shes only half thoroughbred.
 

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For a first horse? Probably not a great idea.

They can be fiery, especially if they've been a successful racehorse. They need that edge to be able to compete and win.

However, not all of them want to race, and those are the ones who usually make the best all-around horses. I have one of those. His attitude is, "We'll get there eventually, so why run?" :wink:

They tend to be harder keepers than some breeds, which means they're not for someone who has no clue how to properly feed one. Even for my easy keepers I'm continuously changing things around depending on the weather, whether or not the horse is in work, and what they need nutritionally to keep them in good shape.

They can also have feet problems, which means instead of barefoot trimming, many of them need shoes all the way around to stay sound. Nothing wrong with that, but it is more expensive than just trimming every 6-8 weeks.

TBs, especially ones off the track, aren't expensive to buy but they can be expensive to maintain properly.
 

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All of my horses are TB's... I personally love them. My gelding Bishop is my barns schoolmaster, and my mare Love Story is the best showjumper Ive ever had. I wouldnt reccomend them as a first horse, because they can be a bit spooky... but I love them
 

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For a first horse? Probably not a great idea.

They can be fiery, especially if they've been a successful racehorse. They need that edge to be able to compete and win.

However, not all of them want to race, and those are the ones who usually make the best all-around horses. I have one of those. His attitude is, "We'll get there eventually, so why run?" :wink:

They tend to be harder keepers than some breeds, which means they're not for someone who has no clue how to properly feed one. Even for my easy keepers I'm continuously changing things around depending on the weather, whether or not the horse is in work, and what they need nutritionally to keep them in good shape.

They can also have feet problems, which means instead of barefoot trimming, many of them need shoes all the way around to stay sound. Nothing wrong with that, but it is more expensive than just trimming every 6-8 weeks.

TBs, especially ones off the track, aren't expensive to buy but they can be expensive to maintain properly.
That is our Aero to a T, lol. She is the most unmotivated horse I have ever had - which is why she has been so good for my daughter. My initial reaction to the suggestion that we consider her (when we went to look at another horse the person had) was, "Uh, NO!", but once we tried her I realized she was not at all what the perception I had of a TB/OTTB. Knowing her now, I can see why she was not successful on the track and came to be available as she was, lol.
 

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From my experiance they can go from one extreme to the other one TBx I know is a 'hot horse' but really hardy, never goes lame etc on the other hand I have known TB in the past that go lame and drop weight at the drop of a hat! just down to individual
 

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I used to have a grey TB named Hunter and he was spastic, crazy, psychopathic, disturbed horse and the best **** jumper I ever owned. He was my best friend for life, and I still get to see him every now and then at Toni's place.

But then again, I also had a little TB mare named Boony and she was sweet, gentle, calm, and the most amazing kids horse. It all depend son what you want. Boony couldn't jump well to save her life, but she had heart.

TB's vary depending on what you want. There are exceptions to every rule. I myself wouldn't buy a TB merely because they aren't built for the kind of riding I want to do. I do a little hunter jumper and hunter under saddle but I can do all that with my paints and QH's.

They can be anything from crazy to calm, psycho to sane, or....well, Hunter to Boony!

I personally adore TB's. If I was to move up into any advanced level of jumping I would probably go and buy or lease one. But if you're going to do less competitive things I wouldn't bother going the extra mile if you find another hrose that is less expensive with just as much talent.

And from my experience at Toni and Miranda's places, TB's are harder to keep than others. Annie is part TB and she's incredibly hard to keep weight on. Hunter and Boony weren't terrible, but they definately took more food than the QH's.
 

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SOME TBs are hotter and more difficult and are harder keepers than 'average", but it can be a very individual thing.

The "hotness" of some Thoroughbreds is directly related to how they are fed, conditioned, and kept. They are SUPPOSED to have alot of energy and drive to run while they are being raced, and they are fed and kept accordingly.

I bought my first TB gelding right off the track, uninjured and racing fit, and he was a handful for around 60 days, until his energy levels from the type of feed and conditioning he had been maintainted at/with came down to the levels of an "average" pasture kept trail riding/pleasure horse, and he adjusted to different surroundings and activities. When I say "handful" and "adjusted" its not like he was wild and got quiet--he was ALWAYS very well mannered from day one, but just had alot of "go" and was super-aware of things that first 60 days, (like different colored tar on the road, LOL)......after his let down/adjustment period, he was less concerned with changes and less energetic.

So, once he was adjusted to normal levels of grain, free pasture access, no more breezing/galloping workouts, and etc., he was no harder to deal with than any other horse. He still had "go" when I asked him for it, but was no longer driven to be ALWAYS going. He was not an easy keeper, but was not a particulaerly hard keeper either.

The main issue we had to work through was his right lead. he had been raced for several years and he ran "around the turn"-- meaning he was never asked to take the right lead, and when turning was always on the left lead... so that took some time and training.

I have owned and currently own TB mares-- some straight off the track, a couple already broodmares-- and I have not found them to be hard keepers as compared to other horses of similar size and age. Currently my three TB mares (2 established broodmares, one came off the track in October) are unblanketed outside 24/7 with a round bale and minimal grain and are doing great in the cold snowy MI winter.

None of the TBs I have owned were particularly expensive to buy (and a couple were free) but I got them knowing they would need re-training for whatever discipline I wanted to do with them, and in some cases they needed time off and/or re-habilitating from an injury.
 

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I've owned my OTTB for about 9 years now. He's almost 15. Had an unsuccessful racing career, and is full of beans, but he's a sweet horse and a lot of fun. We've done jumping, hunter paces, and now we're at a dressage barn so ... guess what? ... he's surprising everyone with his lovely dressage moves. He's never been sick, can go barefoot if he's not on a lot of hard surfaces, and is all around a pretty easy keeper. (Can't skimp on the food, but if he's warm -- 2 blankets in the winter -- and well fed, he's fine.) He's very smart and can/is willing to learn anything. I've had a number of horses along the way, and I would say to look for a horse that has a good heart. My OTTB takes very good care of me, always gives his best effort, and generally gives me the benefit of the doubt. That's all worth $20k in my book!
 

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The thing with TB's is that they are bred to be high-performance athletes. Little thought is given to life after the track - So things like bad feet, hard keepers, think skin, thin coats, sensitivity etc. get overlooked in favour of speed, heart and athletiticism. They aren't issues when at the track - they are shod, stabled, fed massive amounts of high starch and high sugar feeds, kept in optimal fitness, monitered daily for injury, etc.

Because of their intended purpose - It is hard for them to adjust to life as a 'horse' instead of an athlete. Their motabolism is designed to digest large amounts of energy - When you take that away and expect them to live on pasture, some take a while to adjust, some never do.

Feet that are used to being shod are too soft to go barefoot without a long transition - Bodies that are designed to be at maximum fitness and not carry any excess weight struggle to stay balanced.

Of course, there are always exceptions - But the breed itself is designed as a high performance athlete, so easy keeper TB's are only exceptions - not the norm.

I personally wouldn't buy a TB because of that reason - I stick with breeds that are designed to be tough, hardy and self sufficient. of course there are exceptions there are well - but my chances of having an easy to keep horse are much higher.
 

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My sister owns a Thoroughbred and I own a Quarter Horse. We have definatly experienced more injuries, ect. with our Thoroughbred. That is absolutly no reason that you should not look at a Thoroughbred. There are amazing tbs out there that don't have these problems. A lot of Thoroughbreds are know to have these problems that you talk about because many of them raced before becoming riding horses. Thoroughbreds are cold blooded and they have a tendency to be higher strong then other breeds like the quarter horse. If you are a beginner and/or looking for a first horse thoroughbreds are not always the best, but this doesn't mean that there isn't a Thoroughbred out there for you if you look hard enough :)
 

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TBs are amasing horses, very energetic and smart. I have a paint TB Mare. the only problem i have with her is that she has REALLY high withers. Other then that iv never had a problem with them.
 
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