The Horse Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This school horse has started to pin his ears and move his head towards me really fast when I go to tighten the girth. It all started one day after the girth was done, I wanted to check it and I pushed slightly with my hand right next to it, (as I was taught to do in a clinic to make the process more “gentle” but I digress). I corrected him immediately with a yank (he’s bitless) and he stopped, but since then there were two more instances. There’s nothing I can do about addressing the possible cause (ulcers?) as he’s not mine and BO is not receptive to students feedback. I generally raise my voice or get ready to elbow him the moment I see him starting to turn his face towards me but I am getting a little apprehensive when I need to saddle him up. Is there a trusted method to deal with this?
 

· Registered
Joined
·
500 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
This school horse has started to pin his ears and move his head towards me really fast when I go to tighten the girth. It all started one day after the girth was done, I wanted to check it and I pushed slightly with my hand right next to it, (as I was taught to do in a clinic to make the process more “gentle” but I digress). I corrected him immediately with a yank (he’s bitless) and he stopped, but since then there were two more instances. There’s nothing I can do about addressing the possible cause (ulcers?) as he’s not mine and BO is not receptive to students feedback. I generally raise my voice or get ready to elbow him the moment I see him starting to turn his face towards me but I am getting a little apprehensive when I need to saddle him up. Is there a trusted method to deal with this?
Let me add that I do it very gently and loose first, walk him, trot him and then tighten it up some more. Final adjustment is when I’m mounted but he generally doesn’t have an issue with that.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
595 Posts
If the BO is not receptive then I would not be riding this horse. There are a multitude of reasonings as to potential whys inclding but not limited to being out ribs/sternum/withers/ back etc, ulcers, tack not fitting right, being sour in general etc
I wuld check over your tack and be sure there is nothing poking anywhere. However without being able to rule out pain there is really nothing other than not riding him or being prepared for the potential escalation the more fed up he gets. This could never worsen or it could turn into him trying to take a chunk out of you.
 

· Registered
My black horse is very silly and handsome. He is hard to train most of the time.
Joined
·
770 Posts
Yes check for things that could be hurting him but he could be trying to scare you because he doesn't want to work.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
My horse has done this since I've owned him. I thinking the previous owner cinched him too tight and he resents the possibility that I might do the same. During my entire time of owning him, I've taken great care not to pinch or pull his hair or skin near the girth buckle. He still threatens because of his history of being hurt or pinched.

More recently, I've called his bluff; when he asks as if he's going to put his mouth on me, I move toward him to make it easier for him. If he reaches for me at that point, I simply raise my arm or elbow and meet him half way. Not maliciously or mean but abruptly. He's only done this twice and has decided that it's not a good plan.

I've read from an online trainer that this behavior may be motivated by a desire to engage with us. He's actually asking for interaction. So I've taken to simply rubbing his muzzle and face slowly and quietly when he turns towards me. I think he likes it but I'm only guessing.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Slave2Ponies

· Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
My horse has done this since I've owned him. I thinking the previous owner cinched him too tight and he resents the possibility that I might do the same. During my entire time of owning him, I've taken great care not to pinch or pull his hair or skin near the girth buckle. He still threatens because of his history of being hurt or pinched.

I have a cinchy horse who came with the problem. I think she has a bad memory somewhere. I knew the owner before me and he didn't create the problem either. She still does it, and the only possible physical problem she's ever had is heaves, which she didn't have when she was younger. She actually tried to bite, so I've had to teach her that she's not allowed to turn her head toward me at all when I'm grooming or saddling.

I guess cinchy is a really hard problem to get rid of, so best to be easy with that cinch!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
7,576 Posts
I have a cinchy horse who came with the problem. I think she has a bad memory somewhere. I knew the owner before me and he didn't create the problem either. She still does it, and the only possible physical problem she's ever had is heaves, which she didn't have when she was younger. She actually tried to bite, so I've had to teach her that she's not allowed to turn her head toward me at all when I'm grooming or saddling.

I guess cinchy is a really hard problem to get rid of, so best to be easy with that cinch!
Heaves is painful. It is copd. If you ever had bronchitis you would know how she feels.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
169 Posts
@stevenson , I think her cinchiness far predated the diagnosis heaves. She was cinchy from the age of 4 that I know of. But I've always wondered if somehow she had some unknown symptoms long before she was diagnosed. She's always had a cranky nature and maybe she's just never felt that good all of her life.🙁. I was always thinking ulcers, but that was ruled out.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top