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Hi, I'm a newer rider still learning stuff about horses, so I apologize for my silly question.

I volunteer at a therapeutic barn where we have this one horse who constantly throws his shoes or has a shoe loose. He is a well-bred QH who used to be shown on the QH circuit (I don't know if that makes a difference or not) who now does light work a few days a week as a lesson horse. He's mainly ridden in the indoor which has sand flooring and gets daily turnout. He's probably in his mid-late teens. He has a good farrier who comes every few weeks (to split up how many horses he has to do at once) and none of the other horses he trims/shoes have this problem.

So why is it that every few weeks I have to tramp through the pasture to find a thrown shoe, or go to pick out his hooves only to find a loose shoe?

Also, is it okay to ride him if his shoe is loose? The instructor at the barn and another girl who interned there says it's okay, but I wanted a second opinion.

Thank you!​
 

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No, don't ride if it's loose. And if this horse is in such light work why does it have shoes in the first place? If he was barefoot that would solve the problem.
 

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I would suppose he is shod because he has inherently bad feet. Horses with shelly, thin walled, thin soled hooves can be a real problem. Feeding a supplement with Biotin and Methionine in it can help. It can also help if your farrier uses shoes with clips or uses very light-weight training plates.

Are his heels under-run and low? If so, it also helps if they set the shoes back and get his feet more upright, especially his front ones. That keeps him over-reaching and pulling his shoes loose.

If I had to put up with is bad feet, I would feed a supplement with Biotin and Methioine in it. Then, I would get a good 'barefoot trim' on him and ride him with Easy Boots. He would need his hooves 'rounded up' every couple of weeks for a while to keep him for breaking the wall out above his sole. I would sure give it a try.
 

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No, don't ride if it's loose. And if this horse is in such light work why does it have shoes in the first place? If he was barefoot that would solve the problem.
That was my question. Is this horse shod all around? What shoe keeps coming off? Perhaps they are overreaching and bell boots would help if he MUST have shoes at all.......
 

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I would suppose he is shod because he has inherently bad feet. Horses with shelly, thin walled, thin soled hooves can be a real problem. Feeding a supplement with Biotin and Methionine in it can help. It can also help if your farrier uses shoes with clips or uses very light-weight training plates.
If he is constantly throwing shoes due to thin hoof walls, the last thing you want is clips. If he throws a shoe with a clip, a big chunk of hoof would likely come with.

OP, are you able to find the shoes he throws? If so, the farrier should be able to determine how the shoe is coming off and set it to compensate.
 

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He is either a rescue the Therapy Group took in because they recognized his therapy horse qualities, OR he was given up by the owners because they felt something was so wrong with him, they didn't want to keep him and a being a Therapy Horse would beat the alternative of the auction -possible-slaughter-truck-barn.

Given what his life is now and he spends most of that time in the arena, he does not need shoes but try and get the Owners to hear that.

Also try and get the owners to hear he needs some oral hoof supplements and possibly a diet change.

At the very least, they should be willing to keep him barefoot as it would save money. If their farrier says "he can't go barefoot" they need a new farrier:-(
 

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He is either a rescue the Therapy Group took in because they recognized his therapy horse qualities, OR he was given up by the owners because they felt something was so wrong with him, they didn't want to keep him and a being a Therapy Horse would beat the alternative of the auction -possible-slaughter-truck-barn.

Given what his life is now and he spends most of that time in the arena, he does not need shoes but try and get the Owners to hear that.

Also try and get the owners to hear he needs some oral hoof supplements and possibly a diet change.

At the very least, they should be willing to keep him barefoot as it would save money. If their farrier says "he can't go barefoot" they need a new farrier:-(
And you know this HOW? I happen to have one I free lease to a therapy program and honestly, I resent your implication. My guy needed a new job-he loves it and is good at it. AND, when he is done working there, he will come back to me and live out his days. These programs often benefit all parties involved, including the horse and are not simply for "throw away" auction/meat bound horses. My guy has actually been in 2 different programs, and in neither one did I pay for farrier work, so that is not typically an expense the owner pays for. I do supply his supplements, because I want to specify what he gets. I know what works. You are also wrong about the amount of time spent in arenas-typically they have MAYBE 2 hour long sessions a day, 4-5 days a week. As far as what he is fed-I told them how much when I took him there 18 months ago-they are responsible for him and have fed him to keep him optimum weight, etc. I do not second guess them, as long as he looks good when I go visit, or my friend, who is a local humane officer does the same.

Although I am a believer in barefoot, I do recognize that ALL horses cannot go barefoot, and to imply that a farrier is no good because they say that is a bit ignorant. Unless you personally know this horse, you cannot say what this horse needs.

Oh-and BTW-My horses are not barefoot "to save money".
 

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There are some horses who can't go barefoot no matter who does them.
Doesn't mean the farrier is no good and should be fired.without pictures its hard to tell
 

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Not all horses can be barefoot. Its a fact of life. I had a horse that no matter what we did for her she HAD to have bar shoes. She would go fall on her face lame barefoot. The vet, lameness specialist, 2 barefoot trimmers and a natural balance farrier said she had to have shoes to be in work. Even in a sand indoor arena.

I suspect there is a reason this horse has shoes. For all you know he could be nevicular or some other issue that needs corrective shoeing.
 

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There are other ways besides a nailed on metal shoe to protect a foot that is certainly valid and can improve hoof health and retain soundness. Casting for example with or without the nifty inserts they make. Rubber shoes. Hoof boots. Chances are, the horse isnt being shod properly or at a proper time interval for his feet if he constantly has LOOSE shoes and is throwing them. Someone isnt thinking outside the box or willing to spend the money it takes or simply put some bell boots on the horse if he is being shod properly. Im betting he has long toes and under run heels as many many many of them do that have these problems and it isnt being recognized or there is a diet problem that isnt allowing good hoof growth. Very very few horses actually have genetically bad feet. They have poorly kept feet (environment and/or trimming applied) and poorly fed feet (even if the horse looks fat and healthy) .

If he is ok (IE sound) to ride with a loose or thrown shoe, Someone is dropping the ball on this. Period.
 

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And you know this HOW? I happen to have one I free lease to a therapy program and honestly, I resent your implication. My guy needed a new job-he loves it and is good at it. AND, when he is done working there, he will come back to me and live out his days. These programs often benefit all parties involved, including the horse and are not simply for "throw away" auction/meat bound horses. My guy has actually been in 2 different programs, and in neither one did I pay for farrier work, so that is not typically an expense the owner pays for. I do supply his supplements, because I want to specify what he gets. I know what works. You are also wrong about the amount of time spent in arenas-typically they have MAYBE 2 hour long sessions a day, 4-5 days a week. As far as what he is fed-I told them how much when I took him there 18 months ago-they are responsible for him and have fed him to keep him optimum weight, etc. I do not second guess them, as long as he looks good when I go visit, or my friend, who is a local humane officer does the same.

Although I am a believer in barefoot, I do recognize that ALL horses cannot go barefoot, and to imply that a farrier is no good because they say that is a bit ignorant. Unless you personally know this horse, you cannot say what this horse needs.

Oh-and BTW-My horses are not barefoot "to save money".
Oh my goodness - whoa back a little bit:)

I probably should have done my own thinking outside the box instead of commenting based on what someone I have known for years did with her Paint horse that would not stay sound.

That was after she spent a lot of $$$ money on vets and farriers, pooh-poohed everything I tried to suggest, then GAVE away $3,000 to a Therapy School because she at least wanted to save him from the local slaughter auction if possible. But he'd've gone there if the school wouldn't have taken him:shock::shock:

And no, I have no clue what happened to him after that. We haven't lived in the same state for 15 years. I was more *issed at her than you are at me, and didn't talk to her for nearly a year; by then she had already bought another horse and e-mailed me his picture without saying anything.

As is usual with our 40-year+ friendship and occasional knock-down-drag-outs, that was pretty much how we got back speaking again. She is pretty much the sister I never had; she has carried me thru the loss of my son and I have carried her non-listening-I-know-everything-hind end thru cancer:lol:

Meaning, this too shall pass - not a whole lot on this forum should be taken as a personal assault unless it's specifically pointed at someone:p
 
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Oh my goodness - whoa back a little bit:)

I probably should have done my own thinking outside the box instead of commenting based on what someone I have known for years did with her Paint horse that would not stay sound.

That was after she spent a lot of $$$ money on vets and farriers, pooh-poohed everything I tried to suggest, then GAVE away $3,000 to a Therapy School because she at least wanted to save him from the local slaughter auction if possible. But he'd've gone there if the school wouldn't have taken him:shock::shock:

And no, I have no clue what happened to him after that. We haven't lived in the same state for 15 years. I was more *issed at her than you are at me, and didn't talk to her for nearly a year; by then she had already bought another horse and e-mailed me his picture without saying anything.

As is usual with our 40-year+ friendship and occasional knock-down-drag-outs, that was pretty much how we got back speaking again. She is pretty much the sister I never had; she has carried me thru the loss of my son and I have carried her non-listening-I-know-everything-hind end thru cancer:lol:

Meaning, this too shall pass - not a whole lot on this forum should be taken as a personal assault unless it's specifically pointed at someone:p
Perhaps next time state your personal experience with ONE idiot as just that and avoid generalizing and broad brushing the rest of us in that mentality. Most here want the best for their animals.
 

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That was my question. Is this horse shod all around? What shoe keeps coming off? Perhaps they are overreaching and bell boots would help if he MUST have shoes at all.......
He has front shoes on right now, and it is usually the left front that I see coming off all of the time. He does have an overreaching stride and he wears bell boots.

To the other questions, he was donated out of the kind of someone's heart and any health problems/behavior problems with any of our horses are mentioned up front by the owners or revealed during the trial period we take them for before adding them to our program.

I'm honestly not sure how the farrier actually trims his hooves - he comes during the day most of the time while I'm in school. I will ask someone at the barn about it and hopefully they will have some answers for me.

Thank you guys for your help and suggestions! :)
 
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Perhaps next time state your personal experience with ONE idiot as just that and avoid generalizing and broad brushing the rest of us in that mentality. Most here want the best for their animals.
I certainly will do my best:D

Sorry if your day is not going well --- you aren't usually this tart:-(
 

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My mare used to throw shoes like clockwork. This had been going on for several years, and through several different farriers, so finally I had chalked it up to "Sunny just has crappy feet that can't hold a shoe properly" and just dealt with it for the 4 months out of the year she needed to be shod.

THEN I moved to my current barn. Who has an AMAZING farrier. And Sunny has never lost a shoe since being shod by this new farrier. I couldn't believe it.

So while this is probably not helpful because it doesn't sound like you have much control over which farrier they use, the farrier just might not be that good unfortunately. Maybe they can look into asking the farrier to try shoeing slightly differently or maybe trying a different type of shoe. Sounds like they are doing as much as they currently can to prevent it with the bell boots. :p
 

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Hello;

OK. Here goes.....the bell boots are the wrong size!!!

Don't know if I am right or not but it is something quick easy and cheap to try.

I had to small a bell boot on my horse and she bent her shoe. I didn't realize that they move when the horse is in motion so what is long enough at a stand still is not when she is trotting.

You could try the nylon no turn bell boots, just make sure that they cover the shoe completely when on.

Just a thought. Of course I don't know.

I think it is great that this horse is being a therapy horse. It is so important for the people and for the horse.

It is also great that you are so concerned about this horse. I am sure he really appreciates you being in his corner. Good luck with all you do with him.
 

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Hi;

I also wanted to say that no question is ever silly. I wish everyone that didn't know would ask. The world would sure be a better, safer place.

Very kind of you to donate your time to helping people and horses.
 
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