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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m very very new to horses and taking care of them. I’ve got me a new beautiful Applaloosa and he’s got thrush?? In his front feet. So got some Today/tomorrow mastitis meds and put in his heel. It’s got a deep split there (I’m told by the chiropractor that adjusted him). He’s the one told me to do this. My question is this. Is this something I need to do daily after cleaning out his front feet? I’m so new and he is such a good boy.
Horse Sky Plant Tree Working animal
 

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No. Today is a one time mastitis treatment. Clean the collateral sulci and the central sulcus really well and put the tip as deep as you comfortabley can and apply.
After your thrush clears find a product to use infrequently as prevention
 

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I like No Thrush powder for this purpose. I would pick some of this up and apply daily. Has your new horse seen a trimmer or farrier yet? If not, then you should book an appointment so a professional can assess his feet asap. They are in the best position to advise you.
 

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It depends on how deep the thrush infection goes and how deep the crack in the sulcus is. I have used Tomorrow on my horses when needed and I use it every day for 5 days. Clean the frogs & sulci out real good, fill the sulci with the Tomorrow and put the horse in a dry area to stand for a few hours. You want to give the frogs time to dry out and the meds time to soak in thoroughly.
 

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I have never heard of using mastitis meds on a horses hoof. You may want to have his front feet xrayed if that thrush does not clear up . Also find a good farrier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
He has a ferrier appointment Monday for his second trim. When he got him a month ago he was a pony horse and the track. Never really getting to be in a beautiful pasture. Always in a paddock. He’s so kind and gentle with us. So appreciative of his new home in the sunshine state. We’ll continue to apply the Today for the next few days to get this cleared up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
No. Today is a one time mastitis treatment. Clean the collateral sulci and the central sulcus really well and put the tip as deep as you comfortabley can and apply.
After your thrush clears find a product to use infrequently as prevention
His front ones are pretty deep and we’ve been able to get it in there really well. With him being years in a stall and now being out in the pasture all time. This shouldn’t be a problem for him. What’s a good maintenance product for his feet ?
 

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You can actually use the today twice monthly.
Thrush is caused by anerobic bacteria so exposure to the air will kill it. I'm sure he's getting much better care than he did at the track. He will be 🙂.
Enjoy your journey!
 

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I use this. I pick the feet well, then use a plastic grout cleaning brush to really clean out the central sulcus well. Then this spray goes in. I jam the nozzle right up to the groove so it gets in all the way and really flushes it. I hold the hoof up for about 30 seconds so it can get in there without all immediately running out.


(The bigger container is much better value!)

It has zinc and eucalyptus oil, and other ingredients that help kill bacteria and fungus without creating resistance the way antibiotics (like Today or Tomorrow) can if used longterm. So you can use it to treat and then regularly as a maintenance thing. It isn't harsh and doesn't inhibit regrowth of live tissue the way some old-school thrush treatments do -- like bleach or iodine.

As a side benefit, rubbing it into the backs of my horse's pasterns prevented her from getting scratches this winter, so bonus!

This product is also great. Same company, same gentle ingredients, but in a clay that will stay in the central sulcus and other deep pockets. I like to pack with this every couple of days if the thrush is bad. Best done at night so it can dry in place while the horse is stalled, so it will last during turnout the next day or two.

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
T
I use this. I pick the feet well, then use a plastic grout cleaning brush to really clean out the central sulcus well. Then this spray goes in. I jam the nozzle right up to the groove so it gets in all the way and really flushes it. I hold the hoof up for about 30 seconds so it can get in there without all immediately running out.


(The bigger container is much better value!)

It has zinc and eucalyptus oil, and other ingredients that help kill bacteria and fungus without creating resistance the way antibiotics (like Today or Tomorrow) can if used longterm. So you can use it to treat and then regularly as a maintenance thing. It isn't harsh and doesn't inhibit regrowth of live tissue the way some old-school thrush treatments do -- like bleach or iodine.

As a side benefit, rubbing it into the backs of my horse's pasterns prevented her from getting scratches this winter, so bonus!

This product is also great. Same company, same gentle ingredients, but in a clay that will stay in the central sulcus and other deep pockets. I like to pack with this every couple of days if the thrush is bad. Best done at night so it can dry in place while the horse is stalled, so it will last during turnout the next day or two.

Thank you very much for this advice…
 

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Whatever you use to treat the problem from the outside, it is important to understand that healthy feet are very resistant to thrush. So, when the foot does have thrush, there are typically things going on that are compromising that foot making it vulnerable to the bacteria that cause thrush. These can include diet, trim, hoof balance, etc. If your horse was at the track, there is a good chance he was fed a lot of high-carbohydrate concentrates, which can be a contributing factor in cases of thrush. You might want to get a book which talks about thrush and many more "need to know" hoof topics. Good luck with your lovely boy!
 
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