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Any one have any ideas and/or experience on deworming a hard to deworm horse?
I was stuffing carrots but it wasnt ideal...any ideas are helpful!
 

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Don't try to trick him, just train him! As qtrbel suggested, a good way to do this is to use a syringe with something yummy in. But doing it in 'baby steps' is important too. Get him good with holding it at his cheek, then good at you holding it with the tip in the corner of his mouth, etc.
 

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Have you tried the apple-flavored wormer? Angelina doesn’t find it quite as horrible as the other.
I think your best bet would to have a buddy help you. Have him/her hold tightly to the halter while you stick the syringe into the corner of your horse’s mouth; the quicker the better. Hubby won’t help me, so I tie up Angelina’s lead very tightly and go at it. She hates it but eventually gives up.
 

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I have one boarder's horse here who is impossible to worm, he will pick you up and throw you around the second he realizes that's what you're trying to do. We have no idea why, he's so broke otherwise and lazy as all get out.

There is a reason I have not insisted on working him through this issue, and that is that he has dislocated my shoulder (currently waiting on surgery) several times by shooting his head up while I am trying to hold his halter, and I cannot afford to keep damaging the shoulder further.

What we do with him is load him in the trailer, and get it done quickly, in the trailer he cannot move (slant load), and his head is pretty immobile so we can get it done in there. It has not deterred him from loading whatsoever, he hasn't made the connection because we trailer so often and he's a perfect gentleman. Works for us!
 

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I use applesauce every once in a while just so that way having a syringe in their mouth isn't always a bad thing. When I'm training one to let me deworm, I'll rub the syringe all over the side of their face getting closer and closer until they're comfortable with it, then start going into the corner a few times and eventually they'll let you give it to them without much of a hassle.
 

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Do the work in advance with a plain syringe so they're prepared for the process. Warwick Schiller breaks it down really well here (though obviously take more time with it than he does in this super quick demo video).

 

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so I tie up Angelina’s lead very tightly and go at it. She hates it but eventually gives up.
Best to train them, rather than just force them. You might have an 'easy' horse who continues to give in, but for a lot of horses, you're asking for a REAL fight, doing that. And of course, tying or otherwise trying to force a fighting horse, injuries - to horse &/or human are also likely.

I have one boarder's horse here who is impossible to worm, he will pick you up and throw you around the second he realizes that's what you're trying to do. We have no idea why, he's so broke
I think you'll find, if you let someone stick a big, sharp edged plastic thing in your mouth and then squirt awful tasting stuff out of it, you'll work out why he objects! ;-)
 

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When I get in a horse that isn't easy to deworm we do a couple of things. Since I deworm them almost as soon as they're off the trailer, if they play up while I try to do it, I fix them a nice, small bucket and put the dewormer in the food. I keep a bag of Omolene for just that purpose or a bag of sweet feed. I just give a small amount of food and wait until I know they're hungry so they'll just dive in. Word of caution Make sure they are fed where the barn dogs & cats can't get to the food, you can have a really big vet bill if they get into the feed with the wormer in it. I wouldn't have thought they'd go for it, but a friend's dog cleaned up a feed bowl and ended up nearly dying and in the vet hospital for several days.

Then I start with the empty syringe and then add apple sauce or yogurt and teach them that good stuff comes in those tubes. I also swap out and use an oral syringe a few times, so they learn that anything in a tube is good stuff and then when it's time to give medicine or dewormer, they all but suck it out of the tube.
 

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Quite a few here and that I've seen just stick it in their feed. And yes 1000000% supervise them eating and remove the bowl immediately exactly as dreamcatcher said. It's no joke it can be a dog/cat killer if they get a lick of horse wormer! Another word of caution - fix the bucket to something. One mare tossed hers halfway so it wasn't a guaranteed dose unfortunately. There are also granules that can go in their feed. My mare had an allergic reaction and vet recommended the 5 day course instead which are sachets that just go in their feed. A few here with hard to worm horses are gonna switch to it as well. Ideally though you can and should work on them accepting a yummy syringe just for the sake of training. You never know what meds you might need in there, let alone wormer!
 

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Training with a syringe is always a good idea in general, and applesauce is usually pretty enticing.

But sometimes a horse is just really difficult. My mare is too smart for her own good, I can rub my hands over every inch of her head, stick my fingers in her mouth, and give her applesauce in a syringe, but for some reason she just knows when the syringe contains something else, even if it smells exactly like applesauce to me. We can usually get it done, it just requires several free hours and a lot of patience on my part.

You might consider resorting to a feed-through dewormer (e.g. Equibits). Consult your vet first of course, in fact a vet may be able to provide more insight. Some horses don't need deworming as often as we think they do, depending on their age and living situation.
 

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The best way in my opinion is to train him in such a way that he gets used to it since horses get easily scared making it dangerous for the both of you because either the horse might kick you which would injure you badly or the horse might run away harming itself.
 

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Once a person does the syringe schooling, be prepared for the occasional horse to spit the de-wormer out, regardless of how far back in the mouth you get it.

My Arab (RIP Streeter) was a rescue and like all Arabs he was very clever, so I was tickled pink with myself when I got the meds waaay back in his mouth.

That was the first time I saw the “Arab Monkey Face of Displeasure” he managed to hold the meds in the back of his mouth for several seconds, walk off after I unhaltered him and spit the meds out😂

For several years, I had to hand walk him and rub his throat at the same time, to get him to swallow, as he could hold the stuff at the back of his mouth and spit it out.

He finally did come around to where I could just walk up to him in the field and de-worm him but in truth, I think that might have been when the manufacturers changed the flavoring to something his 13.3H Royal Highness was more inclined to put up with🥰🥰
 
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Its fine and great to say "train them" but some horses are so difficult it is not worth your pain and suffering a injury.
I use a small amount of feed for a few days prior and put in a bit of applesauce mixing it in so the different texture they get used to.
Now when it is worming day I use the same method and squeeze the tube of wormer in the feed, add the applesauce and give to the horse...they get no other anything but water till that small amount of food is gone.
If it takes 2 minutes or 2 hours, their stomach will get the better of them and they will eat...

Dispose of all empty or partially used tubes with cap on immediately in a garbage can with lid or pushed way into the garbage itself so no animal innocently takes and chews on the tube of any variety of product.
Dogs & cats do use Ivermectin and many other drug products but not in the strength of the paste we give to horses, hence the poisoning and potential death threat our animals face if they get into horse specific products of any kind.
A bit of cleaning up after ourselves makes our environment better and safer for all creatures, including us.
🐴... jmo...
 

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I put the tube of wormer in some really sticky tasty sweet feed. Only need about a cup mix in wormer an my horses gobble it up.

My one horse you can not get a syringe near his mouth. Not worth fighting with him because you won't win.
 

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Well, I just dewormed my mustang by putting fenbendazole on her grain. She ate every bite so it must not taste too horrible.

Next time, I will try ivermectin in her grain. Not sure about Quest plus, as that tends to not taste so good.
 

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Well, I just dewormed my mustang by putting fenbendazole on her grain. She ate every bite so it must not taste too horrible.

Next time, I will try ivermectin in her grain. Not sure about Quest plus, as that tends to not taste so good.
None of them tase any good to us but I've put them all on grain/sweet feed/in beet pulp and they've all eaten their meal. I only put about a cup full of the food down with the dewormer, they have to eat it or I won't give them the rest of their grain, so they tend to be pretty agreeable.
 
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