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Dallas is an older quarter horse gelding, and loves going on walks and free riding!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! I was just wondering if there is any tips or things I should know when working with a timid horse.
 

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Calm, cool, collected and consistent. I find that if you are working with the horse and the horse moves out of their comfort zone and isn't ready, if you take them back 2 or 3 steps before they got frightened and then let them do what they're good at and quit, it works wonders to build them up. Next day, they may blow right past that spot that scared them, like it's not even there and make even more progress.
 

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Slow and steady. Acknowledge that you can not compare them to another horses progress.
I like to pick one maybe two things to focus on per session. I don’t care how short the lesson is, if they hit their marks we end it.
 
Dallas is an older quarter horse gelding, and loves going on walks and free riding!
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28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Steady and slow. Accept you won't be able to do much with them at first. Take it slow and don't overwhelme them. This goes for your body language too. Carefull and slow don't move suddenly or invade there space. Let them come to you.
Thank you guys!!

I'm thinking for the first few weeks (or until he gets used to me) to just give him food by hand to get his trust and groom him when he's ready and let him pick the pace.

I just don't want to mess up with this horse because he's already been labeled "bad" for being spooky 😥
 

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Be their confidence for them, do everything in a calm and collected but MEANINGFUL manner, if you second guess what you are doing they will second guess it ten-fold. We are dealing with this with my husbands gelding, we just bought him in June and he has ZERO self confidence and this makes him very timid and spooky.
 

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Patience. Take things at THEIR speed, not yours. Be prepared for setbacks. Accept the horse you have that day.

Also be aware that there are a lot of things that horses count as pressure that you might not even think of as pressure. Your voice. Looking at them. Especially looking them in the eye. Try to figure out where the line is for this particular horse.
 

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Exactly. Keep the lesson micro short. Remember that you want to stop on a positive note. Don't push until the horse wants to quit. Quit before that happens. I have worked with timid horses where the lessons lasted only a few minutes.
 

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Most horses require a considerable investment in time. Hundreds of hundreds of hours. Those people that do mustang makeovers spend their days at the barn, practically living out there. A friend once told me it takes 500 miles to get a broke horse. Depending on the horse that can be true.
 

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Most horses require a considerable investment in time. Hundreds of hundreds of hours. Those people that do mustang makeovers spend their days at the barn, practically living out there. A friend once told me it takes 500 miles to get a broke horse. Depending on the horse that can be true.
A guy I know who's a third generation horse trainer, says he does not consider a horse ready to sell as a "trail horse" until he has about trail 350 miles (567 km) on it. I feel it takes about 150 trail miles (243 km) just to take an already broke horse with some trail experience to get to the point where we are one.
 

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Hi! I was just wondering if there is any tips or things I should know when working with a timid horse.

I'm thinking for the first few weeks (or until he gets used to me) to just give him food by hand to get his trust and groom him when he's ready and let him pick the pace.

I just don't want to mess up with this horse because he's already been labeled "bad" for being spooky 😥
Whose horse is this?
Your sisters?
Your neighbors?

In general, you just have to be quieter and calmer. A timid horse is going to be watching you and very observant. Sudden movements or "too loud" of body language might be too much for the horse. However, you still need to watch for the horse's reaction to know if you are going to far, or need to go farther.

The most important thing to help a horse be not spooky, is to teach them that they can trust you and that you will take care of them. If they look to you for an answer FIRST on whether or not something should concern them (rather than just reacting immediately with a spook by their own decision), then the spooking problem goes away.
 
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