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Hi everyone,
This is my first time EVER posting on a forum, but it's a topic I need a some advice about from people with more experience then me.

A bit about my riding experience and what not, been riding since before I could walk thanks to my mum who ran a riding school in my early years, loaned and rode various horses. Had a fantastic first horse who taught me loads, did a little of everything but mainly local eventing (unaff), wasn't superstar material but was a superstar to me till he died way too early from grass sickness a year 1/2 ago. He was on loan the last 3 years of his life, while I was at uni and other life experiences, but when home rode friends horses, which gave me a taste for dressage. Loaned a horse when I moved home when first horse died, and looked to buy a horse to bring on in dressage. Decided that with my finances that buying a racehorse from auction was best option for me and got current lad in Jan '11. He's coming on lovely and has helped me learn SO much. Currently working at home at Novice/ some Elementary movements, but competing at Prelim till he gets over the fact that I don't want him to run as fast as he can with his nose in the air after we've done canter work haha. Have also done loads of groundwork with him using various techniques from parelli's and monty roberts (the dually was a big breakthrough for our trailer loading tantrums)
HOWEVER, he is 10, has some old tendon scars, and confirmation issues that lead me to believe that competition wise he's not going to be able to cope past Medium (although i hope he proves me wrong). I don't want to write too much of an essay although it's already that way, but I have ambitions to compete up to atleast PSG.

So lately have been considering buying a 7mnth old Oldenburg colt which looks like it has bags of potential..I have the time and the money for a foal as I work nights. The foal is going very cheap thanks to the sh***y economic climate and is probably going to be the only way I could afford something so nice out of good bloodstock. It would also give me the chance to start working on something that will be ready for more attention just as my current boy will want to be easing out of work a bit. I have handled foals from working at yards, but to be honest they've all been cobs, so no experience with the kind of foal i'd be buying. Luckily for me my mum has about 45yrs experience, and has backed many a youngster as well as working at an arab stud, and bringing on her own foals so i wouldn't be without help.

Does anyone have any experience in bringing on warmblood type foals. Any info about their general temperaments. Does it work out cheaper or more expensive? How long should i turn him away for and what is a good age to start backing them, not sure if it makes a difference as they carry on growing much longer then other horses?
Basically is it a bad idea?

Thanks for any input
 

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Their temperaments vary just as much as my personality varies from the girl next door :)

My boy is a hanoverian, I bought him at 7 months as well, he is now 15 months. He is very, VERY quiet! An absolutely fantastic brain, he is so enthusiastic to learn that I need to be mindful that I don't over do it. He's cheeky, he asks questions and needs to be put back in line fairly often, but never does anything nasty or dirty, and learns from his 'mistakes' rapidly.

His half 'brother', but the same stallion, is trainable, but a heck of a lot more pushy, very sensitive and more of a professionals horse.

You get your comatose warmbloods, that never even ask a question, and in the same line you will get something that is off its rocker, smells an oat and will be off galloping laps around the paddock.

If you can meet the mare, that is your best starting point, as they will more often than not take after the mare's temperament. Also look at the temperaments of other progeny by the same stallion.


Good luck, youngsters are very rewarding!
 

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No experience of my own, but my BO is just launching a breeding operation for WBs, and I've been talking to her a lot about it. She's got a great deal of experience training and works a lot with WBs (including mine, whom I bought from her this year...but he's a mature fellow, just turned 18).

So here's my second-hand information for you based 100% on what she's told me over the last few months. WBs mature physically more slowly than TBs and other horses like that. The barn acquired two Oldenburg fillies this year, both of them not quite three years old right now. Both of them are very lively, mare-ish as you can be, sweet-tempered when they aren't being mare-ish. And both of them obviously still have quite a bit of growing to do. Neither one has ever been under saddle - BO says it's her general policy not to put any of her horses under saddle until they are 3, but she told me that because these WBs will still be growing a lot at that age, she'll be showing them only in hand this year.
 

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They certainly do mature slower than a lot of breeds as a general rule, but like any horse there are exceptions. I have a friend with a D-line filly, 18 months old, already a good 16.2hh and looks like a 4 year old. Uphill, beautifully developed topline, everything in proportion and her brain is so good that she could probably be broken quite easily tomorrow.
It is hard not to be tempted to jump on when you get one like that I can imagine!!
 

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I have an Oldenburg colt who is almost 5, I bought him when he was 2, but did his ground training prior to that. He has a lovely disposition and is quiet and steady outside of a few incidents we chalk up to age. He was very good about everything with the exception of the wash rack, and has been very willing in everything that's asked of him. He's been very slow to fill out, he got very tall and the rest has yet to catch up. We started him under saddle when he was a little over 3, after the vet had confirmed his knees were "closed" and it was ok to start him. My trainer has an Oldenburg that is about 7 and still growing, but he's freakishly huge. They waited until age 4 to start him, I believe.

As far as cost, I had to pay a trainer to start him for me, as I had never done that and didn't want to risk screwing up. Sounds like your mom is more than qualified and could be a great help, so it may be cheaper for you in the long run rather than buying a made horse. I haven't had any extra expenses that I wouldn't have had with any other horse.
 
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