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Just curious why the first thing anybody thinks about when they get a colt is clipping him.
I'm new to riding and horses in general but this strikes me as odd. Shouldn't the behavior of the horse be determined by his personality and the training rather than whether or not he's intact?
Again, I'm relatively new to horses so correct me if you find something off in my logic. Just alot of empathy there you know.
 

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To a point he's the personality is affected by training. However the horse isn't under the control of a trainer every single second of the day. Stallions get urges and urges to act on those urges. Even a stallion well trained with a handler or under saddle can be unruly in the field near mares or other geldings. It's also near impossible to board a stallion and many people won't consider buying one either.
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Now, I'm not at ALL experienced with stallions. But from my limited observations of stallions I've seen handled or have been around...

Some were a handful, constantly testing their handler. One or two I remember were what I would consider somewhat dangerous and in need of a very experience horse person. My old instructor's Friesian stallion seemed like a dream under saddle, but on the ground? I wouldn't go near him. But on the other hand, I've seen some who were puppy-dogs. I once lunged a horse (someone was teaching me how to lunge better) then loved all over him... only to find out he was a stallion! He had me fooled. He was so cool, calm, and collected.

From what I know, gelding a stallion eliminates/minimizes hormone charged behaviors. If I had a young, intact colt (which I don't see myself having any time soon, if ever) I would certainly get him gelded. I don't have the experience or the need for a stallion. I don't plan on ever breeding.

Take this with a grain of salt! Again, I am not experienced with stallions!
 

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A gelding is way easier to deal with then a stallion. It takes a special person that knows how to deal with stallions to train one and keep one. It also takes special facilities to keep studs as moat studs can't live with other horses and will go through fences to get to mares. Stallions that aren't taught properly from the get go can be dangerous. Geldings are much more easy going and forgiving as they don't have to deal with the raging hormones. Believe me if it was an easy thing to do I would get my mare "fixed" lol.
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The hormonal issues people have listed above are reason enough. But for me, beyond that, there is the issue of over population. The first thing I do with a cat or a dog is get them fixed. Why? Because there are too many of them! Horses are just the same. Odds are a stallion will breed in it's lifetime. Whether that is due to hormones and an accident or a stupid backyard breeder the result is the same. The world doesn't need more horses. Unless you have substantial knowledge and are breeding to IMPROVE the breed it just shouldn't be done in my opinion.
 

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Horses are horses first and whatever sex they are second. So yes, training, expectations and rules/boundaries are huge in how any horse behaves. Exercise, herd socialization, and how the horse is managed (stalled, turned out, etc) also play into it quite a bit. I actually don't have a problem or fear of stallions in general like some seem to, but even so, would probably geld any colt I owned asap. Really, it's simply because so many places ranging from boarding facilities, shows, events and more will have extra requirements or not allow studs at all, so that is an extra complication that isn't worth dealing with when I have no intention of actually using a stud's original equipment.

For my purposes, a gelding is far more convenient, and there's the additional bonus of not having to manage any studdy tendencies. Dealing with any 1000lb horse can be potentially dangerous if they get the notion to disobey or challenge you, and those hormones can make that a fair bit more likely. Still. Horses are horses first, give any of them an inch and be ready for them to take a mile.
 

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Just curious why the first thing anybody thinks about when they get a colt is clipping him.
I'm new to riding and horses in general but this strikes me as odd. Shouldn't the behavior of the horse be determined by his personality and the training rather than whether or not he's intact?
Again, I'm relatively new to horses so correct me if you find something off in my logic. Just alot of empathy there you know.
Yes, but the first thing people do when they get a dog is "clip" him. Same logic, except you can add the fact that no matter how well behaved a horse is a large dangerous animal and add stallion hormones and you have a very dangerous situation. Can you keep that danger to a minimum by training and the horses personality? Yes, but you cannot eliminate it.

I feel like you have two separate topics there and that is where you're confusion is coming in.
 

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Why not?? Other then breeding I don't really see any reason not to. Obviously you don't have to breed just because they can, and when handled right they are/can be just as easy as any other gender, but for me personally it's not a question of if, but when, because I don't want to be limited! Many places/events don't allow stallions, that right there is enough. Also, although I do not currently own a mare, both my mom and nephew do, and even if they didn't, I'd still want the option of having one without having to make major housing/fencing changes when a simple gelding would take care of the problem.

And I'd rather do it when they are young and their parts are nice and small, then big and large, I would assume it's better for the horse.

Another thing to consider, I know with my dog (previous dog), I waited til he was 2+ before I neutered him, I had no intact females and knew I was responsible enough that he wouldn't be breeding anything. My neighbor at the time had 3 intact females, so there was often a female in heat near by, Havoc was good, and never did or even tried to get to them. I could see a change in him, and could tell just by his behavior that they were in heat, mostly he just became very clingy and stuck to me everywhere I went, and at the time I would have said all was good. But after I neutered him, it was like a huge weight had been lifted off him, and he could finally relax. Hard to explain exactly what changed, it was more the tension (that I hadn't even realized was there), had been lifted. I know he was a happier dog after his surgery, that convinced me that a non breeding dog is best off (mentally) neutered. I don't know if it would be the same for a horse, but makes since, if they aren't being bred, but still have the urge (especially if, like in the case of my dog, they have to be near enough to smell a female in heat). I want my horse focusing on me when I work with him, not the hottie 4 stalls down. It's hard enough keeping a geldings attention when they are using the brain in their head, I don't want to have to have to fight for his attention when he's using his other brain. (and did you know there is a part of a horse's testical that looks like a tiny brain?)
 

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Just curious why the first thing anybody thinks about when they get a colt is clipping him.
I'm new to riding and horses in general but this strikes me as odd. Shouldn't the behavior of the horse be determined by his personality and the training rather than whether or not he's intact?
Again, I'm relatively new to horses so correct me if you find something off in my logic. Just alot of empathy there you know.
An intact horse's personality is affected by hormones -ask any mare owner :wink: . Gelding takes those hormonal urges out of the picture for the most part.

Yes, training can and does help to manage these effects but really the only reason to keep a male intact is breeding and passing along his genetics to the next generation.
 

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All of the above and let me reiterate the points about breeding.

Do a poll on this forum alone, of all the rescued mares who turned up preggars and nobody knew.

I am forum acquainted with someone who bought registered mare because the Sellers "couldn't get her pregnant".

Well surprise surprise, her foal is just now ready to be weaned.

So how'd that happen? The Sellers had to do some serious mental back tracking but they concluded it was an 18 month old colt that was in the same pasture with the mare.

They didn't "think" an 18 month old could get a mare in foal -- HINT, if the testicles have dropped, he can get a mare in foal.

Stallions have bred mares thru and over fences, much to the consternation of the mare's owner.

Nobody needs to own a stallion unless they are a legitimate and well established breeder. Just like nobody needs to own a dog that hasn't been fixed for the same reasons.

There is way too much over-population in our domestic critter world and some of them are dying ahead of their times because of it.
 

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There is also mares to think about. Even if you have a perfectly behaved, well-mannered stud, there are absolutely mares that will jump fences to get to the boys. Dealing with that is ANNOYING.

There were a pair of mares (mother and daughter) at the farm where I board my free-lease gelding, and they were ridiculous during their heats. They drove all the boys wild, in particular my guy and my trainer's who were both gelded late. When the neighbors bought a mini stallion? OH that was rough.
 

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No one else even mentioned the empathy-sorry, horses live in the moment, & once the "equipment" is gone, they don't miss the foals that won't be born!

Another thing for a guy to think about-a fellow asked me to marry him-he already had a child that he couldn't afford to pay support for-I said, ask me again AFTER you have taken care of the "problem" as I didn't want to have a child that he could not support-& it needed to be done while he was a single man, as I did not want to hear the argument-if I had been a wife & also signed at the Dr's office-that I had forced him to get "fixed". So, he did it as a single man-not paying his child support-& when he did bring it up-I reminded him of the circumstances. Also, his father did have the operation reversed for himself, later in life & had another child, so he knew that was an option, also.
 

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Bottom line unless he is a valuable horse that can make valuable babies there are way too many horses around today. Don't make any more. There is no reason to not do it, and you will save yourself a load of potential problems.
 
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