The Horse Forum banner

To trim or not to trim?

1231 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  loosie
Hello! I currently have 10 month old who since November/December has been seen by our current barefoot farrier. Another farrier who I use to shoe my current horse mentioned how short she is and that right now no damage is done because she is light, but she can go lame since she is being cut too short.

my question is who do I believe? the barefoot trimmer cuts her feet and rasps. Where upon reading I see no one cuts babies. they rasp. so who do I believe? what are your guys opinions?
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
I think that most traditional farriers leave the foot way too long. Look at examples of proper barefoot trims, they always look a lot shorter than the traditional foot. If the baby is sound, I wouldn't change it. I see so many young ones with mile long feet. Better that she develops the proper shorter foot than a longer one that needs help.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,804 Posts
My boy had nippers used on him when he was 10 months old. His first trim was at 5 months and I believe the first time nippers was used was when he was around 8 months. It depends on how long the foot is and how much needs to be taken off. I could trim his feet using just a rasp if I wanted to, but nipping off most of the overgrowth then rasping them clean is a lot easier on my rasp and my back lol.

If you think there's a trimming issue, you can post some pictures of his feet to get an opinion from a few of us.

And your farrier is wrong about his feet not being an issue right now. In fact, right now is the most critical time for his feet to be correct. It sets a foundation for his future soundness and can impact how he grows and matures. It's best to be proactive to ensure he's growing correctly, including the feet he walks on.

ETA: Change all those he's to she's lol. I'd love to see pictures of your little filly!
Posted via Mobile Device
 
  • Like
Reactions: amigoboy

· Premium Member
Joined
·
24,143 Posts
My advice is learn what's what yourself, so you can make more informed decisions on what's best. Learn about hoof form & function & different effects of different approaches.

IME the big difference between philosophies is peripheral loading; the hoof wall is meant to bear the entire horse - v's loading the entire base of the hoof; the inner hoof wall shares the load. A person who believes in peripheral loading will think a foot is too short if the walls are near sole level.

Not that they're going to be peripherally loaded if they're on yielding footing whichever way...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top