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I just recently bought this yearling and it’s evident that she is toeing out. I know some of this is slightly normal and will correct with age but hers looks a little severe. Is there ways to fix it? Am I over worried?
 

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I came to offer a WELCOME to the Forum.


I'm no expert and think your questions should be made to a vet for their input and guidance on what if anything to do...
I look at all your pictures and it troubles me to see such swelling in the legs as the pictures depict...
As said, no expert here but any babies/yearlings I've seen are thin legs and joints not swelling and solid appearance.


I hope your youngster is absolutely fine, but think your best direction is to take those concerns to a qualified vet to do a hands-on exam.
Good luck.

:runninghorse2:...
 

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I came to offer a WELCOME to the Forum.


I'm no expert and think your questions should be made to a vet for their input and guidance on what if anything to do...
I look at all your pictures and it troubles me to see such swelling in the legs as the pictures depict...
As said, no expert here but any babies/yearlings I've seen are thin legs and joints not swelling and solid appearance.


I hope your youngster is absolutely fine, but think your best direction is to take those concerns to a qualified vet to do a hands-on exam.
Good luck.

:runninghorse2:...
This ^^^^

The kiddo needs a professional opinion. That’s partly why there are so many hits on your post and no comments:smile:
 

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Had to look again after above comments - on fone, can't see much detail but they looked a bit off. Seems maybe right legs (front & hind?). Are more swollen? Ditto I'd be getting a good lameness expert to her, not leaving it.

As to your question, depends how they're toeing out - eg are legs actually turned at joints, or are they straight but tight thru shoulders & hips - eg. Looks like she's a bit cow hocked & base narrow behind, so pelvis issue not leg/foot issue as such, and esp as she is a... Malleable youngster, may just take an easy chiro adjustment to straighten her out.
 

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I do plan to get vet checked of course. A lot of the swelling happened after my farrier clipped her feet(they were really bad). Unfortunately I wasn’t impressed about how he handled it, as he took it all off, so I will be looking for a new farrier for her as well.
 

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hard to see in those photos. one further back showing the horse would be better. She looks to be splay footed and only so much can be done with corrective trimming.
 

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Am I seeing an optical illusion or has the filly sliced off part of her right rear foot? Doesn't look recent.
 

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Am I seeing an optical illusion or has the filly sliced off part of her right rear foot? Doesn't look recent.
To answer that it’s just her markings. Her white goes up the back of her foot. There doesn’t look to be any scaring of any sort
 

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Must be my glasses, I thought the inside of that foot looked a little concave.
 

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Sometimes farrier’s get too carried away when it comes to trimming hooves that have been let go for a long time.

They take too much in one strike, which can really the sore the horse up — either in the hooves, the tendons or both:(

I would not want this particular farrier trying to trim this yearling again, for fear you end up with a horse with permanent damage in the leg(s). The farrier does not appear knowledgeable in corrective work and may possibly over-correct the splay foot.

The vet (hopefully good on lameness issues) really should take x-rays of the hoof and ultrasound the leg, IMHO, and go from there.

You did mention changing farrier’s, if you don’t know of a therapeutic farrier in your area, try looking on New Horse.

https://www.newhorse.com/

Click on The “farrier’s” button, then go to your state and also the neighboring state, if you’re close to a border:)

Now that you’ve explained how the baby got swollen ankles, you could cold hose all of them for 10-12 minutes each, if the swelling is still there. I hope it isn’t - it should have started going down by now. Do the ankles feel warm to the touch?

If they do, since there are four to deal with, I would poultice and wrap. Sore-No-More is a benzonite clay/arnica cold poultice that you can wrap.

My lameness vet had me cold hose the legs, poultice, wrap with vet wrap, cover with pillow leg wraps (which there is a right and wrong direction to wrap), then wrap all that with Velcro closure standing wraps.

I had to do that for 11 months when an AFA certifies farrier took too much heel off my foundered horse in one strike and literally tore both front tendons.

Also, your yearling isn’t a Tennessee Walker is it? Many of them do tend to be splay-footed but they are generally born splay-footed on both fronts and the rule is to not try and correct them, just to trim the hooves according to what they ask for:)

Your follow-up explanation helped a lot. When I saw your photos and those swollen joints, I nearly passed out and immediately thought this is not a question for the cyber world to figure out, it’s a question for a hands on vet.

It is still a question for a vet that can physically examine and hopefully x-ray your yearling but at least your further explanation has allowed for some input:):)

Please let us know what the vet says and I hope you can find a farrier who specializes in lameness issues, even though the yearling isn’t lame. Therapeutic farrier’s have had training in various types of hoof issues that the typical farrier has not:)
 

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I do plan to get vet checked of course. A lot of the swelling happened after my farrier clipped her feet(they were really bad). Unfortunately I wasn’t impressed about how he handled it, as he took it all off, so I will be looking for a new farrier for her as well.
Plan to get the vet NOW!! That is a VERY bad sign, if the swelling happened after the farrier! Either he changed angles so much that he's caused strained tendons, but the other very big possibility is that he has damaged her joints &/or bones through rough handling!! A baby's bones & joints are 'green' & cartilaginous, not yet ossified, and as such they are very easily damaged - the main reason you shouldn't hard tie or ride young horses too. I hope it's not that, and that if it is, it's not permanent damage he has done. But PROMPT veterinary attention - from a specialised equine lameness vet(got any racecourses around your way?) is your best bet.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Sometimes farrier’s get too carried away when it comes to trimming hooves that have been let go for a long time.

They take too much in one strike, which can really the sore the horse up — either in the hooves, the tendons or both:(

I would not want this particular farrier trying to trim this yearling again, for fear you end up with a horse with permanent damage in the leg(s). The farrier does not appear knowledgeable in corrective work and may possibly over-correct the splay foot.

The vet (hopefully good on lameness issues) really should take x-rays of the hoof and ultrasound the leg, IMHO, and go from there.

You did mention changing farrier’s, if you don’t know of a therapeutic farrier in your area, try looking on New Horse.

https://www.newhorse.com/

Click on The “farrier’s” button, then go to your state and also the neighboring state, if you’re close to a border:)

Now that you’ve explained how the baby got swollen ankles, you could cold hose all of them for 10-12 minutes each, if the swelling is still there. I hope it isn’t - it should have started going down by now. Do the ankles feel warm to the touch?

If they do, since there are four to deal with, I would poultice and wrap. Sore-No-More is a benzonite clay/arnica cold poultice that you can wrap.

My lameness vet had me cold hose the legs, poultice, wrap with vet wrap, cover with pillow leg wraps (which there is a right and wrong direction to wrap), then wrap all that with Velcro closure standing wraps.

I had to do that for 11 months when an AFA certifies farrier took too much heel off my foundered horse in one strike and literally tore both front tendons.

Also, your yearling isn’t a Tennessee Walker is it? Many of them do tend to be splay-footed but they are generally born splay-footed on both fronts and the rule is to not try and correct them, just to trim the hooves according to what they ask for:)

Your follow-up explanation helped a lot. When I saw your photos and those swollen joints, I nearly passed out and immediately thought this is not a question for the cyber world to figure out, it’s a question for a hands on vet.

It is still a question for a vet that can physically examine and hopefully x-ray your yearling but at least your further explanation has allowed for some input:):)

Please let us know what the vet says and I hope you can find a farrier who specializes in lameness issues, even though the yearling isn’t lame. Therapeutic farrier’s have had training in various types of hoof issues that the typical farrier has not:)
She’s gonna be ok. Swelling is gone, legs are straight, hooves are going to take continuous work, but shouldn’t cause lameness complications(checked by professional). It is possible that her hip is out so she has an appointment for that as well.
 

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She’s gonna be ok. Swelling is gone, legs are straight, hooves are going to take continuous work, but shouldn’t cause lameness complications(checked by professional). It is possible that her hip is out so she has an appointment for that as well.
Good if she's OK. Did you get her xrayed or anything? Because you can't see without rads or ultrasound whether any damage has been done. Just because her legs are straight unfortunately doesn't rule out much. But to correct & support any damage now will hopefully mean it's relatively easily correctable, whereas damage to growth plates which gets left may cause serious distortion down the track.

Case in point is my dog who got trodden on by my horse & wrenched her foot out, when she was still a pup. She had no deformation. They did xray her foot and found no fractures. Sent me home & said nothing wrong but bruising. After a week she was still lame & I rang the vet & asked if they should do another xray of further up her leg. They told me no need, no probs. I said I wanted it done anyway & somewhat annoyed at me, they did it for me but said 'nothing to show'. It did stop hurting her & I thought all was well. Then many months later, I thought her foot looked a little turned out... at first was so subtle I had to compare pics to be sure, but after a few months, it was obvious... I took her to a(nother) vet who confirmed a fracture to the ulna growth plate that was blatantly obvious in the second rads I'd made them take, but the first vet missed. It was minor, and didn't break completely, but did enough damage to retard the growth plate. So the radius kept growing, while the ulna growth stopped... causing the 'green' radius to twist as it grew! Orthopedic surgery had to wait until her bones 'closed' & nothing could be done before that - it was too late to brace it to prevent the deformation by then, so it was necessarily left to get worse. Surgery meant cutting both bones completely through, twisting them back to (close to) where they should have been & bolting them in place there. So, the op & aftercare were intensive and lasted months. And because it was left to get that severe before 'fixing', it didn't take too well anyway - there was only so much the vet could do, when all the carpus & elbow joints, the ligaments & tendons had developed around the deformity. It is certainly better than it was, but still deformed and gives the poor girl grief if she does too much running & jumping.

So... as that 'fix' is possibly not even an option for a horse, but would be far more intensive(& expensive), as the horse may never be sound after it anyway, I'd absolutely advise you don't 'wait & see' but if you haven't find out definitely now & deal with it, don't wait!
 
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