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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I'm blanketing some this year, my thought is come spring I would like to clip Nick with a low trace or a sweat clip, he goes through a "gosh im miserable in my sweater" phase around March/April when we're still getting some winter and the horses have not started to shed yet. I think it would make him more comfortable in ridden work and also when he's just turned out since, on hot days when it gets up to 50 and he's still floofed, he looks and acts like a sluggish baked potato, But I'm concerned because 1. He is never in a stall, in fact his pasture has no shelter. and . 2 . It gets super super cold every now and again and I would hate for him to be uncomfortably cold if we have a bad cold snap.

Any thoughts? Are there specific clip designs what would be best suited?
 

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I used a bib clip on my horse when he was out 24/7. Covering the front of the throat, down the chest and sometimes back to the girth area. Depending on the weather he had a rug at night or was rugged all of the time and an extra fleece added at night. He had access to two shelters but only used them in the summer. The others had trace clips but were in at night. It depends on work, the horses and conditions though, as there was one Highland who had trace clips but she had a thick coat and didn't need rugs unless it was really bad.
 
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You can modify any clip to better fit the needs of your horse and living environment.
Trace clips can be made as high or low as you want and remove or leave as much as needed.

As you can see the trace, Irish, bib aka "a strip" are all very similar basic lines...
Expanded upon and tailored to the horses needs....all your lines can be as high or as low as your horse needs.

If you are concerned about the horse having adequate protection if a real cold snap, blankets must be available and I would even go so far as saying a belly-band blanket could also be great to have on hand as covering the belly makes sense if "naked" to be warmer and better protected.

If you ride often and the horse truly sweats badly, I would clip the areas where the animal sweats and stays damp/wet for a long time to assist with cool down and in fact assist in the horse not overheating while being ridden.
Clipped horses just need some fore-thought to have on hand blankets, sheets and coolers you might need to keep them comfortable.
:runninghorse2:...
jmo...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you both,

He is quite comfortable in winter in part because it is so cold, but oncw we start the winter-summer high amplitude sine function that is Montana spring, I think we'd both appreciate him being a little naked. I think a low trace would be good and then leave a fair about of fluff towards the back of the underbelly?
 

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I've clipped horses outside 24/7 in Canadian winters. No problems. I've done trace clips without the necks clipped and chaser clips with the neck done. I leave the bellies and around their butts hairy to give extra comfort. Multiple blanket weights, neck covers if the neck is done.

If you clip in the spring, you need to be very on top of their blankets. Nights still get way too cold for fresh clips but days are too hot for full blankets. I prefer to clip over winter so come spring they have hair to keep them warm enough, but it's still not a full winter coat.
 

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Side-by-side variations of trace clip...the first picture is more a chaser style.
Also remember you can reverse what is clipped and what is left long and protective thick too.
If your horse sweats under the saddle another spot to consider reducing the coat thickness.
You also don't need to "scalp" a close real close but with careful blade choice you can leave a bit of hair for protection but ease of cooling out and drying of the coat still happens.


As a kid my horse looked like a yak...
He would sweat so bad...and be dreadful to get dry.
My dads friend clipped about 2" either side of the windpipe, between the front legs and a bit higher where my girth would go...the rest was left hairy long.
It worked and didn't expose the horse to frigid cold so bad either...
Clipped what was needed for me, didn't care so much about looks as it sheds out anyway in time. :cool:
:runninghorse2:...
 

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@horselovinguy

Like leave 1/2 inch? Or more? Or less?
The "not quite shorn" sounds ideal to me for his own comfort.
Absolutely...
You have hair length left options dependent upon blade.
I "body clip" with large machines like the Oster Large Animal clipper.
Today there are many manufacturers, but I own Oster machines so that is what I use...

Many have used A5 clippers to do body clipping and profess the clip looks wonderful...
In actuality, it does not...but that is somewhat a personal perception of appropriate length coat remaining or scalped literally in looks. I am accustomed to professionals clipping show horses and yes, there is a large difference in appearances to what you use in a finished job.
Only you will know what kind of machine you will use...but choose a wider blade if possible and do the research of how long the coat is left.
The wider the blade the less strokes of the machine you must do. The wider the blade the faster the job is accomplished.

There are guides... do a search of clipper blade coat length left and a huge assortment of charts and blades appear.

Know and understand what the letters mean on blades too as it makes a difference...
You can also use any snap-on blade interchangeably regardless of manufacturer. Whether dog, horse, human use they are all interchangeable and can offer you many options you would not otherwise realize you have.
I found a guide of blade number to hair cut length that might help...


When you decide to do the job, purchase several blades so never using a dull or hot blade on your horse or a bad job, a angry horse and a potential wreck from hot clipper blade touching sensitive skin could happen.
I use kerosene to dip my blades in to lubricate and cool them, a large clean towel to wipe off before applying to a horses hide is a must, or invest in several cans of clipper spray.
You mentioned 1/2"+ or in that vicinity.... that would transfer to being a 3, 5, 5/8, or 3/4 blade to look for and at.
Then you want a full cut style....
Chances are you will need to order in the blades not find them in a tack shop...

Good luck.
:runninghorse2:...
 
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