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Discussion Starter #1
Hello!!! This is mainly for trainers, but anyone's input would be much appreciated!!!

Just a quick rundown of the situation, I'm 15 and looking at getting my GED. I've been around horses for roughly 10 years, but I've owned and really worked with them for the past 8 years. Mostly just general work/western pleasure and trail riding. I worked doing public trail rides for a few years at a local campground and I'm learning how to ride English. I'd really like to become a horse trainer and eventually riding instructor for mainly the western style however. I do know that in internships you're mostly doing grunt work, which (for the record) would like to say I'm not afraid of working hard long hours.

I would really like to intern with some Western trainers, like reining, cutting, barrels ect... So, I guess my questions would be:

1.) Would a trainer consider taking a 16 year old on for an internship?
2.) Would they give me lessons on how to actually ride? I know how to ride, but not in any really specific area (except some english I've been learning recently).

Basically, would they take me on with my background and age? If not what could I do to improve my chances? Thank you for any and all input!
 

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I am sure there are some trainers out there that would work with you. If you would be willing to clean stalls they would probable be willing to give you lessons. I doubt they would put you in a cituation where you where riding clients horses but if you are looking to learn there are a lot of possibilities out there. Look around your area. See what trainers are out there go and talk to them. The better the trainer the bigger the barn the more help they will need and in some ways the better chance and the more you will learn. Finding a local trainer who has done very little will not help you much but who knows. Never herts to ask around.

NRHA use to have a non pro apprintes program. Not sure if they still do. Look on web site like NRHA and such find a trainer close to you and call and talk to them. It might end up a summer thing here you will need to go and live there. Again never know until you ask.
 

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Sixteen years old is pretty young, and there are liability issues that any trainer would have to consider.

My advice would be to find a job at a barn -- cleaning tack, grooming show horses, whatever -- until you turn 18. You might try to find a stable at which the trainer/instructor is willing to give you riding lessons in exchange for the work.

In addition to your age, the other issue is your riding ability. In order to be beneficial to a trainer (as an intern, assistant, etc.) you must be able to not only ride the horses in training, but also help those horses' owners reach their goals. Your post doesn't indicate your writing ability, but you suggested that you are not proficient in any particular discipline.

The goal in the horse business is always to obtain as much education as possible. You might think of going to college and taking courses in equine science if any are available. But your riding skills must be top-notch in order to be considered for an internship -- or, at least, a valuable one.

I'm a horse business consultant and riding instructor, and I used to train horses, so I'll check back here later to see if you have any more specific questions, and I'll try to help wherever I can.

Good luck!
 

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The guy who owns and trains cutting horses close by DOES take young riders (the girl riding there is I believe 13 or 14). He obviously doesn't care much about liability (and girl doesn' wear helmet which is complete bs IMO, because if something happens to her (knock on wood) I'm sure the parents will sue the guy). But anyway yes, some trainers out there WILL take you in and train.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
:)
The better the trainer the bigger the barn the more help they will need and in some ways the better chance and the more you will learn. Finding a local trainer who has done very little will not help you much but who knows. Never herts to ask around. NRHA use to have a non pro apprintes program. Not sure if they still do. Look on web site like NRHA and such find a trainer close to you and call and talk to them. It might end up a summer thing here you will need to go and live there. Again never know until you ask.
I will for sure look into that! Thanks for the advice!!!:D

Sixteen years old is pretty young, and there are liability issues that any trainer would have to consider.
Would becoming emancipated get rid of the liability issues?

the other issue is your riding ability. In order to be beneficial to a trainer (as an intern, assistant, etc.) you must be able to not only ride the horses in training, but also help those horses' owners reach their goals. Your post doesn't indicate your writing ability, but you suggested that you are not proficient in any particular discipline.
I would say I'm an intermidiate/adv. rider. I can handle a horse that is acting up, I currently have three horses. My gelding use to be a well mannered stallion when we bought him, but after be bred my mare (an accident) he turned a little unruly. My dad had him gelded and it helped a little. I took him to my friend's house (an English trainer and riding instructor) who has been helping (and teaching me) how to work with him. I now have an almost 2yr. old filly that I've been ground training her and this summer will take her to my friends where we'll really get her ready to ride. My friend for about two years has been giving me English riding lessons. So I'd say I am more proficient in English. By the time I will be looking for an internship, I'll hopefully have started intense training with my friend. I don't believe it would be all that difficult for me to adjust in order to carry out a task the trainer asked me to do with a horse on ground or riding. I'm not trying to talk myself up, I'm just giving my opinion.:oops:

I'm a horse business consultant and riding instructor, and I used to train horses, so I'll check back here later to see if you have any more specific questions, and I'll try to help wherever I can.

Good luck!
Thanks!:)

The guy who owns and trains cutting horses close by DOES take young riders (the girl riding there is I believe 13 or 14). He obviously doesn't care much about liability (and girl doesn' wear helmet which is complete bs IMO, because if something happens to her (knock on wood) I'm sure the parents will sue the guy). But anyway yes, some trainers out there WILL take you in and train.
That's amazingly dumb on the trainer's part, and on the kids part. I always wear my helmet :shock: lol Thanks though for giving me an example:)
 

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We have had a couple of younger students from Europe come for three months at a time and ride and one was 16 and did quite well.
There are also foreign exchange programs to Australia and the outback stations that a person your age could get involved with.
Most of the trainers kind of need you to walk into the barn and ask for work though.
Some of the trainers in our area are also starting to ask for some money to cover living costs.
 

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Come to australia! It's great :]

Lol sorry.

I might jump in here - My situation is a little different, but also quite similar. In a few years, I would like to head over to the US and do an internship with a reining or reined cow horse trainer. I'm 19 now - So would be 21/22. I'm an experienced rider, have owned/trained numerous horses and regularly show in a number of disciplines - I have my first pony to break in now. I guess i'm wondering how many trainers would be willing to take on someone like me in return for my keep?
 

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Come to australia! It's great :]

Lol sorry.

I might jump in here - My situation is a little different, but also quite similar. In a few years, I would like to head over to the US and do an internship with a reining or reined cow horse trainer. I'm 19 now - So would be 21/22. I'm an experienced rider, have owned/trained numerous horses and regularly show in a number of disciplines - I have my first pony to break in now. I guess i'm wondering how many trainers would be willing to take on someone like me in return for my keep?

The Ward Ranch(one of the biggest reined cow horse barns in California)Hires ONLY Australians and has a company over there screen students for an 8 month stay.
I think you get paid also.
There head trainer is from Australia.
Ward River Ranch
 

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Hires ONLY Australians
Isn't that illegal? I'm not being like OMG DISCRIMINATION!!! lol Just curious:wink: Or is it more like they don't actually state that they only hire Australians, it's just your chance of getting in are like %100 better if you are Australian.
 

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I think they do it to promote the sport over there. If you try and get reining and reined cow horse into an area and there is no good trainers or people interested it will not work. I know of a lot of trainers who come over from other countrys and work with the BNT here to learn then go back and set up shop.
 

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That's amazingly dumb on the trainer's part, and on the kids part. I always wear my helmet :shock: lol Thanks though for giving me an example:)
Well, he thinks helmets are dumb and was picking on me on that (I DO wear one after my fall because my saddle broke) till I told him that if he'll pay my disability I can take it off. This shut him up pretty good - never picked on me since that.

I'd keep looking for really good trainers around. Try to ask people in horse community, or (that's really helpful) farriers or vets if you know any. Some trainers do not advertise their business (that's how it was with this cutting trainer, my farrier told me about him).
 

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Isn't that illegal? I'm not being like OMG DISCRIMINATION!!! lol Just curious:wink: Or is it more like they don't actually state that they only hire Australians, it's just your chance of getting in are like %100 better if you are Australian.
No, it's not. I am positive they don't hire them as "workers", but as an "exchange visitors" (different type of visa and restrictions).
 

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Sorry to hijacking the post, but..

nrhareiner, is reining very different from cutting?
 

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Different saddles,movement,and even horses.

No cows in reining,only in reined cow horse work and it has three events.
Dry work,herd,and down the fence.

National Reined Cow Horse Association - NRCHA - National Reined Cow Horse Association
National Cutting Horse Association
NRHA - National Reining Horse Association

Marecare beat me too it. There are differences and some similarities too but not like there use to be. IN the past you could take a cutting bred horse and do reining. Not so much any more. Most reining will change over to reining cow horse fairly easily.

Reined cow horse out side the aged events do not have herd work. You only work one cow and put them through a pattern.
 

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Thanks, guys! I was wondering because I tried cutting, but never tried reining. May be something to take a lesson on for fun.
 

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I really wanna do somthing like this to. im only 17. you have to be 18.Stacy westfall and Clinton anderson have apretenceship programs. Its a long shot but im going to apply for it anyway. I do work at a barn now and i start all of the horses under saddle....but its alot of cleaning stalls and other work to.
 
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