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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am training my young colt Peso. My trainer has been doing hard activities and he's passing with flying colors. He is doing so well we can't figure out what else to do with him. He is pivoting,picking up his feet, most of the basics.
Please leave me some suggestions on new stuff to do and challenging!
 

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How old is he? I had a colt like that once and my trainer said to start walking/trotting him over tarps, logs, anything remotely scary and then when he did that we put a lightweight saddle on him just to get him used to the feeling (no one got on and we didn't lunge just did it in hand). Just some ideas. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How old is he? I had a colt like that once and my trainer said to start walking/trotting him over tarps, logs, anything remotely scary and then when he did that we put a lightweight saddle on him just to get him used to the feeling (no one got on and we didn't lunge just did it in hand). Just some ideas. :)
He is about 7 months we have put a little kid on him. The girl is very light. He doesn't spook to easily. We have taken him on tarps too.
 

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I would not put any child on a young horse regardless of weight. A young horse is so unknown and they get into "flights of fancy" where they just have a fit because they can and they think they can get away with it. A young kid on a 7 month old horse is asking for someone to get hurt in my opinion.

I would focus on ground work stuff and leave the saddle until he is much, much older. In my (somewhat limited, I have not had a yearling in training in years) experience, they get to be the most challenging around 1-3 years of age. A yearling just has too many ideas and is just starting to really push buttons. I would focus on respect work because he may be great at 7 months but I would bet that at some point in the next 5 months he is going to challenge you in a big way. This is double true is he is intact.

Focus on good horse skills, leading, picking up feet, backing up, putting a head down for haltering, ground tying, having all body parts handled (read sheath cleaning, ear trimming), coming when called, loading in a trailer, standing for vaccines, behaving for worming, etc.
 

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Focus on good horse skills, leading, picking up feet, backing up, putting a head down for haltering, ground tying, having all body parts handled (read sheath cleaning, ear trimming), coming when called, loading in a trailer, standing for vaccines, behaving for worming, etc.
I agree.

We focus first on what you need to "doctor" them first (touch/halter/lead/tie/feet/etc), then basically what you would do in a showmanship class for the first 2 years, and let them be babies.
 

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What can you do with a baby horse? All sorts of things, aside from weight bearing, high impact stuff(like jumping, fast circles, etc) and aside from physically forceful things, such as tying up firm, tying legs up, whatever - immature bones & joints are very easily damaged. For those reasons, as well as Rookie's, regarding safety & behaviour, I wouldn't put a child on a baby horse.
 

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With my yearling I did and do: lunging at a walk/trot, spraying with hose, spraying for fly spray, picking up feet and standing for trimming, trailer loading, tying, brushing, ponying, desensitizing, moving hindquarters, shoulders, side passing, leading along the gravel roads, take them to new places, get them used to boots being put on. My friend even recommended you could do a little bit of trick training also :) Oh you could also do ground driving and then do it over obstacle courses :)
 

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Is putting a child on him a joke to get people riled up? If that's true I worry for that child, she could of gotten killed, was she at least in a helmet and a protective vest to protect her just in case? Beyond that is how physically immature he is to be carrying weight. Is your trainer supporting that?

With the basics done, turn him out and let him grow up, pull him out every so often to check oh his manners and for general handling. In the meantime while he's growing up, find a good trainer that will work on things that are age appropriate and can teach you to do the same. Being so inexperienced in this I would also expect inexperience in other horse related activities. Invest in riding lessons so when your colt is older, started under saddle and has come back from a trainer you'll be able to effectively ride him.
 
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