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Discussion Starter #1
Okay.. well when i get a horse this summer. I may be getting a horse who has never jumped in its life. Would this be a right way to teach it?
Go over ground poles
practice 2 point on horse
2 point over ground poles
trot over lowest jump notch thing
keep getting high during trotting
move to cantering
 

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actually step one would be 1) make sure he is well educated on the flat.



Before I start a horse over fences he must first be able have a solid and balanced w/t/c both directions, be able to move off my leg (leg yield, shoulder/haunches in...), slow his pace when I say slow, increase when I say increase. I use groundpoles while working on flatwork. Without a solid foundation a house will fall apart. A horse's is no different.

after that I trot over things and keep everything small. even my horses that are starting to canter courses jump fairly small.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
oh well im experienced with jumping i took 3 years of jumping lessons
 

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3 years (which isn't that long, really) of jumping lessons riding horses that already know how to jump is very different than attempting to teach a horse that has no clue how to jump. Riding a made horse is different than training a green one.

I would get a trainer to supervise you. If you've got a willing/easy horse and you're a good rider, you can probably do it with minimal supervision. But you still should have some help.
 

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3 years (which isn't that long, really) of jumping lessons riding horses that already know how to jump is very different than attempting to teach a horse that has no clue how to jump. Riding a made horse is different than training a green one.

I would get a trainer to supervise you. If you've got a willing/easy horse and you're a good rider, you can probably do it with minimal supervision. But you still should have some help.
Exactly. My sister has been riding for ten years on all kinds of different horses, and she still jumps and trains jumping under coach supervision.

Horsepeople will admire and praise you more when you take the responsible route with the horse first in your mind, not your ego.
 

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To the OP, in your other threads you say you are looking for a rescue horse. Unless you are willing to look long and hard (but you also say that you *need* a horse, and soon!) you are not going to find a well trained jumper in a rescue situation. It is very easy to sour a horse to jumping or even injure them if you're not training properly. A trainer can help you avoid disaster.

You may have experience jumping (and I agree that three years is not really that much experience, but at 13 I'm sure it seems like a lot) but you do not have experience training. No worries, this will come with time. In the meantime, please get a trainer who can help you and your new buddy, when you get him, make sure that you will have a long and happy partnership. If you do get a rescue, you should be ready to work through a lot of tough times together, the least of which will be figuring out your jumps! Best of luck, I know how much you want a horse, so I know you'll make the right decisions with him and take really good care of him!
 

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I agree with the others, if you are getting a rescue horse, I would suggest you first work on trust and get to know the horse. Then I think it's best to spend at least six months purely on flatwork. If he/she is younger, then even longer.

Once you have gotten that straight, then start slowly with small cross poles, and abit of grid work, and progress upwards.

For the jumping, I highly recommend getting a trainer to help you. Or even an instructer.

Let us know about the horse hunting. :wink:
 

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Yes I agree. You are definitely going to need a trainer if your horse has never jumped before. 3 years is definitely not long enough, especially when you learned on school horses.
 

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Just wanted to add to what everyone else has been saying: i rode at a small barn where all of the lesson horses were perfectly trained, and i only once went over the head of one of the ponies, and it was my own fault. i recently moved to a different barn, and many of the lesson horses aren't for beginners. Before i had moved, i was dead set on buying an untrained horse, and teaching him how to jump. i rode a 17.3hh warmblood gelding named morrie, and i experienced first-hand what inexperienced trainers can do to a horse. He had been imported from Europe by a rich family when he was four or five, but none of them were experienced enough to ride him. Now he has some pretty bad habits because they weren't able to correct them.
i've been jumping for six years, and riding dressage for seven. i'm still not ready to train a horse, and i don't think i will be anytime soon. Sure, i've ridden the four-year-old pony, the difficult horses with various issues, and horses like Thumper who just take off after every jump and hollow out, but there are still so many problems that i HAVEN'T experienced first-hand, and i know that if i ever ran into one of those problems, i would have no clue whatsoever how to fix it.
My advice? Buy a horse who already knows how to jump. if you can't afford a trained horse, lease. But if you're dead-set on buying a horse and training them to jump, please please please get a trainer to help you along the way.
 

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I totally agree with the above post. The stable I started riding at last year have quite a few horses that aren't that easy to ride.

Night Heat is a good example. I started jumping her last year, and she was not one of the easiest rides I have had...I still battle abit to control her. I would never have gotten anywhere if it wasn't for my riding intructer. He helps me and guides me, and only really gets on Night Heat when she is being REALLY difficult. Otherwise he lets me sort through her problems.

She is going alot better now than she was last year, but as I said, I still have a lot of work to do on her.

A trainer or instructer will never be a waste of money or time. It would be better than to run into a problem by yourself and get you or your horse hurt.... :smile:
 

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Okay.. well when i get a horse this summer. I may be getting a horse who has never jumped in its life. Would this be a right way to teach it?
Go over ground poles
practice 2 point on horse
2 point over ground poles
trot over lowest jump notch thing
keep getting high during trotting
move to cantering
No, that's not the right way.

Now I have a question: Where are your parents? Tell them to PM me, because I've got a whole lot to say to them.
 

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If your so exprienced with jumping, why are you asking on here how to teach a horse to do it?
You defiantly will need a trainer to help you, it's impossible without a professional to teach your horse corrrectly and safely.
 

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If you can’t afford to have a trainer/instructor there every time have them come out once or twice a month. If that isn’t possible have an trainer/instructor or 2 to ask when you run into problems, that’s what I do with Trooper. I have many experienced friends.
All I can say is take your time and never go above your and the horses comfort level, and if you’re unsure check with someone who knows.
Training books are very helpful to.

And guys I don’t think its necessary to "talk to her parents". If you cant say it to her don’t to say it to her parents.
She came here looking for tips/advice on how to teach her horse to jump. Yes its a hard/tedious thing to do, and she should have help. If she doesn’t try she won’t learn. It does not mean you need to take her or her parents down a peg. She’s looking for support, not to be told she doesn’t have the experience (considering you haven’t seen her ride, I don’t think you can judge this.)
 

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I was also thinking that nirvana. They don't have to be harsh. All she was wanting was some advice. Not to be told off. If you don't have anything constructive to say, don't say anything at all. :wink:
 

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I agree that the posts about the parents were probably not necessary, but in truth if you read some of the other posts from the OP it is blatantly obvious that she is a 13 year old girl with very unrealistic expectations. No harm there, we were all in those shoes at one point, but those of us with a little more life experience do need to help bring her down to earth a bit, or she's going to get herself seriously injured.
 

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I agree that the posts about the parents were probably not necessary, but in truth if you read some of the other posts from the OP it is blatantly obvious that she is a 13 year old girl with very unrealistic expectations. No harm there, we were all in those shoes at one point, but those of us with a little more life experience do need to help bring her down to earth a bit, or she's going to get herself seriously injured.
This is what we were trying to get at. If I were a parent (especially one that doesn't know anything about horses), I'd want to know if my child was doing something that could potentially get themself killed or seriously hurt.
When I was in Pony Club, I saw far too many parents buying their children overpriced, green horses for them to "train". A month later, most of them ended up handing the horse off to one of the coaches because it either got a bad habit, or the child fell off of it too many times. One girl even ending up in hospital because her horse reared and flipped over on her.

I'm speaking from personal experience here. I've seen others go down that road. I've been down that road myself.
You can buy a green horse and train it, but you can't do it alone. You don't have to do it alone, and you shouldn't for the sake of the horse.
 

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I agree that the posts about the parents were probably not necessary, but in truth if you read some of the other posts from the OP it is blatantly obvious that she is a 13 year old girl with very unrealistic expectations. No harm there, we were all in those shoes at one point, but those of us with a little more life experience do need to help bring her down to earth a bit, or she's going to get herself seriously injured.
Yes she shouldnt do it on her own, but it doesnt mean she cant do it at all. But my advice to the OP would be to ask her instructor to be honest with her in wether she is ready to take on such a responsibility.
I think age has nothing to do with the matter (it also wasnt her who metioned her age, nor did she confirm that it is a rescue horse). I was 13, when I got Trooper, and I was mature enough at that age to know when to say I need help.
 
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