The Horse Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone!

Sorry for posting this, I am sure there are similar threads, but none came up in my search. I am interested in learning the steps to teach a horse to lay down/bow/sit up.

I know how to teach a horse to give kisses on command, but thats about it, lol! If anyone has any experience in this, I'd love to know what tools you use and each detailed step you do to progress to laying down on command. I have a book, but just don't understand the way its written, lol!

Can't wait to hear and would love to see some pics of people doing tricks with their horses!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Hey everyone!

Sorry for posting this, I am sure there are similar threads, but none came up in my search. I am interested in learning the steps to teach a horse to lay down/bow/sit up.

I know how to teach a horse to give kisses on command, but thats about it, lol! If anyone has any experience in this, I'd love to know what tools you use and each detailed step you do to progress to laying down on command. I have a book, but just don't understand the way its written, lol!

Can't wait to hear and would love to see some pics of people doing tricks with their horses!
Well, seriously the most important thing to do when training a horse to do a trick is to teach then WHEN to do it, and when NOT to do it. If you have that down, then it wont be a problem when teaching a horse to rear/lay down and etc.

My little sister taught her horse how to lye down, and she did it within one day. Well, technically about 5 months as she had to build the trust first, but she did the actual lying down part in one day.

She now has him where she picks up his foot, tells him lye down, and he lyes down, on the spot. She can do it with a halter on, or completely at liberty. BUT, he knows when he CANT lye down, like when the farrier comes, or she is picking out his hooves. He personally has never had one single problem ever with lying down at the wrong time, however some horses may not be the same, and decide when they want to lye down, whether you asked them or not.

Anyhow, its your horse, your risk.

She took him out with a rope halter and two leads for his first lying down session. She then picked up his left front foot, and took the other lead rope (About 6ft long) and loosely tied it on his left front foot. She now has his left foot with a lead rope tied on it, tied on where you still have the rest of the length of rope. She then, standing at his left side, put the rope under him, and walked to the other side (right side), picked up the rope, (which is tied to his leg LOOSELY around his pastern) and put it on his back. It is now wrapped around his girth line if you pull it taught, and the end of the lead is hanging on his left side.

Walking back over to the left side, where his leg is tied, and the same rope that is tied to his leg is lying on his back, she picks up his left front foot, and then grabs the end of the lead and pulls it taught. It is now holding that foot up. (The rope should be on his girth line) Holding his foot up with the rope, she then gently pushed on his shoulder and asked him to 'lay down'. If he doesnt lye down with the pressure on his shoulder, and his leg being held up, she pulls on the other lead rope (I am assuming you have a lead rope attached to your halter) as if to back him up, instead of backing up though, he just lyed down.

Honestly, I dont know if that made any sense, so if it doesnt, please ask me what parts make no sense, and if it all doesnt make sense, then :lol: I will re write it.

It might sound harsh to have a rope tied to their leg, but seroisuly, she wasnt pulling the horse over, and was just simply holding the rope, which was holding his foot up so she could stand facing his body, and use her other hand to pull his head back, or add pressure on his shoulder.

A few things to note though, when your horse eventually doe lye down, dont let him get up until you say so, or else in time he will just come to think that "Hey, I can get up whenever I want, I dont have to wait for the human". It gets rather aggravating when you have the horse lye down for 5 seconds before he is up again.

After a while, you will not need the rope on his leg, but also, make sure before you lift his leg, to ASK him to lye down, so he knows the command and eventually you will only have to ask him.

Erm, she posted some pictures just a few days ago in the pictures section... Lemme find one or two. And oh, sorry, this is the only trick that I know how to train :shock:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Awesome, so when she has the rope around the pastern and barrel of the horse, is it attached to the left leg of the horse, then passed under the belly and up the other side?

I've actually done this one before, but didn't ever get to the point where the horse would lay down without picking his foot up, which is what I want mine to do. I know some people use a dressage crop or whatever it is called to cue, but have no idea how to get it started lol!

How long did it take your sis from start to finish to get him to lay down without the rope on his leg?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Awesome, so when she has the rope around the pastern and barrel of the horse, is it attached to the left leg of the horse, then passed under the belly and up the other side?
Yup, that is exactly right.

I've actually done this one before, but didn't ever get to the point where the horse would lay down without picking his foot up, which is what I want mine to do. I know some people use a dressage crop or whatever it is called to cue, but have no idea how to get it started lol!
She never used a whip, ever. She did this with the cue of tapping his leg a certain number of times with her foot, or hand, while asking him to lye down, then she would life his foot up if he wouldnt respond.

How long did it take your sis from start to finish to get him to lay down without the rope on his leg?
Well, within a few days when she tied the rope on his leg, and lifted it, he would imiidiatly fall over, but then she took a long break from doing it, as it would make him sore if you over do it. So, all in all, it took her about one month of almost everyday (If I add it together, as she took a few months off just cause) training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I have been trying to teach my horse to lay down for months!! I even have a tommy turvey kit to help! I pick up her leg and she gives a little hop and kicks it down! please someone help figure this out? :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
I have been trying to teach my horse to lay down for months!! I even have a tommy turvey kit to help! I pick up her leg and she gives a little hop and kicks it down! please someone help figure this out? :/
it could be a trust issue.. Ive read a lot of trick training books., and the biggest thing is trust for a horse to lay down or bow for you.. Im not saying your horse doesnt trust you, but it could be the problem..? Or she might not understand what your asking of her..

http://www.stunthorse.com <-- this is a great site. Maybe it can offer some help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you Legend!

Evan, I actually have the trickonometry book and didn't understand it very well. It might be me though, lol. Did you have a decent time reading and applying it? I'll look at the other one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
Thank you Legend!

Evansk, I actually have the trickonometry book and didn't understand it very well. It might be me though, lol. Did you have a decent time reading and applying it? I'll look at the other one!
Personally, I didnt like the Trickonometry book. I didn't find it very clear in the instructions at all.

I personally perfer www.stunthorse.com , the book she published is great and very clear. I got to watch her perform at the calgary stampede last year with the Gypsy Cobs was great to see.

** plus you can get her book a lot cheaper than on Amazon haha :D **
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'll look at that one as well. I'm glad I wasn't the only one who didn't understand it well, lol. Makes me feel a little dense when something so simple looks frickin complicated as hell, lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
270 Posts
Personally, I didnt like the Trickonometry book. I didn't find it very clear in the instructions at all.

I personally perfer www.stunthorse.com , the book she published is great and very clear. I got to watch her perform at the calgary stampede last year with the Gypsy Cobs was great to see.

** plus you can get her book a lot cheaper than on Amazon haha :D **
May I ask how much the book was when you bought it? I looked at it on Amazon, and for some reason, either my computer is playing mind games on me, or I am not understanding all the way how Amazon works, but its says you can get the used one for $199... I was like :shock: See, look here. Something is wrong :shock:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
667 Posts
May I ask how much the book was when you bought it? I looked at it on Amazon, and for some reason, either my computer is playing mind games on me, or I am not understanding all the way how Amazon works, but its says you can get the used one for $199... I was like :shock: See, look here. Something is wrong :shock:

I never bought it on Amazon if you go to her site www.stunthorse.com and got it for 27.95 <-- and that included shipping. haha I wouldnt pay $199 for the book on amazon when i can get it for $28 hahaha

I had the same reaction when I saw it on Amazon..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
it could be a trust issue.. Ive read a lot of trick training books., and the biggest thing is trust for a horse to lay down or bow for you.. Im not saying your horse doesnt trust you, but it could be the problem..? Or she might not understand what your asking of her..

http://www.stunthorse.com <-- this is a great site. Maybe it can offer some help?
I know she trust me because I am the only person that she will walk into the trailer for but that doesn't mean in all aspects plus she could be a little confused cause I never have asked her to do anything like this before so any excerises I can do to build some extra trust maybe?
I also have to be careful because she hops sometimes lol and I don't want her to get hurt so she prob. figured out thats her way out of work.. :?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Just like training anything else, consistency. Positive re-enforcement!

Also figure out why you want to do what you want to do and what the goal is. While some tricks are cute, some are not so much when taught incorrectly or when the horse starts to do it without being asked (rearing, lying down, comes to mind).

I taught my gelding to "fetch" when he was out of work and bored last summer, he had an abscess so we couldn't ride him for about 3 weeks, he was show fit and bored out of his mind. He already has the propensity to be mouthy and wanting to pick stuff up, so it was just praise when he did it, and he is naturally curious. His lessee also taught him how to nod yes, but he will not do "no" at all lol.

Now my mare, I would never teach tricks to. She is one that I need to be pretty firm with at all times, any time you are lax she can get nervous and lose her poor little mind. She is not playful or mouthy by nature, even turned loose in the indoor to play, she will walk/trot/canter on a 20m circle, almost exactly our longeing routine (and I rarely longe!) whether she has tack on or not. The only time she will play is if the horses are inside for the day and I let her out to roll in the indoor arena.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top