The Horse Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A year ago I started learning about hooves and how to start doing my own trims, but not being confident enough from lack of experience I hired on a new trimmer. My trimmer has been working on their hooves since last Spring, and i'm wanting to get back into doing them myself. I've received some feedback about my standardbreds hooves from another thread here (the "what is going on with these shoes" thread), but I am hoping to get some opinions about my Quarter Horse here.

These photo's were taken after a fresh trim (I apologize they are not of the greatest quality).
I will post brighter photos (taken on day 3 after the trim) on the next part but wanted to post the originals first.

What I am hoping to get here is what you think about the trim, does it look good, what could be changed (if I were to do it myself next time?) I've been told that too much toe was removed (all three mares show sole pressure at the toe area following this trim cycle).

I may even post my third mares hooves in this thread as well but I'll make sure to point out that it's a different horse.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here are the "brighter" photos taken from day 3.
I have softened up the quarters since they were left as sharp edges.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,457 Posts
Following. Looks to me like there isn't much hoof wall left at the toe, but I really don't know much about it so hopefully others will jump in!

Probably should have some pics of the hoof on the floor as well so angles can be seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hopefully these are ok! My front-on photos ended up awful and were taken on angles.

You'll also notice a big lump on one of her hinds, if anyone is curious we had x-rays done in 2012, it's osteoarthritis she got as a 3 year old with her previous owner.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
***This is the other mare****

The last photo is showing the sole pressure at the toe I noted, she had boots on during turnout (day on - day off) to keep on artimud for her thrush as well as wrap a front heel bulb injury (the rest of the white stuff is talc).
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
14,682 Posts
I can't explain it but to me you have some issues with those feet and how they were trimmed, finished and look.

Maybe they are fine, but to me they don't look right...
That person would not be touching my horses feet again.

I'm waiting to hear what those with better knowledge say and think and why...
:runninghorse2:....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
23,881 Posts
To give you some idea, I've drawn on your pics. Green 'balance lines' are where I *guess*(from looking at other pics of sole too) back, centre of balance, and 'breakover' should be. Blue lines are *roughly* where/how I'd trim. Heels on fores would be beveled, so the bearing surface can be brought *back* further without lowering too much - tho from other pics looks like you can afford to lower some too. Toe ground surface would be bevelled *slightly* from wherever 'breakover' is deemed to be, then turned into a 'roll' when it gets to the hoof wall. They don't look as if the toe is stretched much, if at all, so appears nothing particularly special needs doing at the toe.

Appears toe sole(from depth at point of frog) is quite shallow, while heels are 'run forward' but not overly high - but they are probably a little in fronts. Appears that hoof on the ground pic is 'broken back' hoof/pastern axis, but may only be how he's standing. And bars look a little overlong all round.

Oh and as for toe walls not giving any 'support', I don't subscribe to that theory, that the 'fingernails'(effectively) should be 'supporting' the animal. Their primary purpose is to protect the hoof, not support, and just like our own nails if we put too much pressure on them, they will distort(flare) & break. So they *should* be kept short, so they may share a bit of the load if healthy, but not be a major loadbearing structure. And if there's already distortion, &/or ahead of 'breakover', where a horse rolls their foot forward, I do believe it should be pretty much relieved of active weightbearing, as has been done here. Does depend a bit on the environment the horse lives & works on, and walls can afford to be a bit longer(in relation to sole) when a horse is only on yielding footing for eg.
 

Attachments

1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top