The Horse Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My horse reportedly has a tumor on her belly. Took her to vet in January because I could not figure out what this open wound was, the vet told me it was a tumor. He banded the tumor and got part of it off and pretty much sent me on my way. It's open, constantly oozing.... first off I had never heard of or encountered an open tumor, I can tell its growing again, it has not closed up or anything. I am worried because I don't want bugs getting in it, I dont know how to heal it up or if it's even possible to heal it (close it). Does this mean she has cancer all through her body? I asked the Vet her prognosis,life span, and he said she will live indefinitely.... so how do I continue care for this. He gave us a spray (Catron IV) I think it was called, but that has no affect that I can see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,983 Posts
Get a different vet. It sounds like they did not do a good job with the removal. Surgical removal is preferable compared with banding it off. My cat had a tumor removed from her belly. They removed the tumor and healthy tissue surrounding the tumor to get clear margins. She had 12 stitches and healed up really well. 3 days of pain meds, and 10 days later the stitches were removed. By day 4 she was already resuming mostly normal activities with the exception of her E collar. I think the pain meds were the most difficult part- as they made her like a zombie.

Is this a sarcoid tumor? Those can get very aggressive if they are messed with but still need to be managed.
Michael Porter, Equine Veterinarian: Sarcoid Tumor in a Horse

Identifying the type of tumor is important.

If there is an open wound, you likely have bacterial infection, possibly fungal infection as well. So you definitely need to consult a different vet. Surgery shouldn't be that expensive - $400-600ish if you find a reasonable vet. Depends if they can do the surgery on your property or offsite, and how extensive the surgery is. You may not even need surgery but a different medication for the wound.

If this was an injury, it could be proud flesh which is non cancerous. You really need to see a different vet for a second opinion. Not enough information for me to give you any more of an answer than that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,635 Posts
You need to find out what kind of tumor it is. Is your horse Grey- it may be a melanoma - or it could be a sarcoid tumor and if so XTERRA paste works very well for those. Get more info as treatment options differ depending on the type of tumor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is a sarcoid, according to the vet. He gave me another spray and of course I left it at the barn, but I know it's not Xterra... and he never mentioned surgery. Just said this is a problem that we could be fighting forever.... That's not good enough now that you all have said there are other options, so I'm on the hunt for a new Vet. Unfortunately my finances are not good right now, because I work at a school and summer is coming really fast, but I will do what I can however I can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
I know an appy who gets tumors on his wee wee. They are removed every few years or whenever needed.
The vet freezes off with liquid nitrogen, but used to cut them off before that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
At this point, after hours of research I have decided to try some Thuja pills and cream. It has gotten decent results for working, will let everyone know how it goes.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
36,133 Posts
It sounds as if your horse has a sarcoid.
Unfortunately there are a variety of different types of sarcoid and they all react in different ways to treatments.
If you use the wrong treatment you can make them a lot worse
Most equine vets prefer to not meddle with them in terms of creating an open wound because that can accelerate the spread and the growth. As long as the sarcoid growth is still present below the surface it will not heal, it might scab over but that's all.
They grow inwards, not just outwards. You can remove the outer part but if the sarcoid is still growing inwards it will just spread. They don't invade other organs.
The sort of lotions and potions you're now trying are 'snake oil'. The reason some people think they work is because they've used them on the type of sarcoid lookalikes - equine papilloma - that are like the warts that humans get. A lot of time they will just go on their own with no treatment at all but because someone once said an incantation over a rabbits foot at the stroke of midnight then buried it under the apple tree with a sprig of lavender to remove the warts from their hands and they just happened to go all by themselves the spell became a 'thing'


Your horse needs to be seen by a good equine vet who will do a biopsy to see what type of sarcoid your horse has to correct treatment can be used.
We had a 100% success when our vet used cryotherapy to freeze a large cluster of bleeding sarcoids from a mare we bought out of pity. The hair never grew back over the area and the skin that grew back pink rather than black but they never came back. She was a lovely horse so worth the cost


You should try to cover the area during fly season or they'll lay maggots in it. Try a dry dressing held in place with super sticky tape - shave the area around it to help the tape stick better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A good equine vet around here is non-existent. In fact a friend of mine who does rodeo takes her horses to another state. I don't have that option. It is already an open wound, and yes I know about maggots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
If its a sarcoid, there's a vet in my area who has been doing autologic vaccines/treatments with good success. They excise part of the sarcoid and insert multiple pieces under the skin of the neck. Interesting stuff.

Ask around on Facebook and other places. There might be a good vet closer than out of state that you don't know of.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,319 Posts
I'm sorry to hear about your predicament. There were several years of yawning vacuum between having good horse vets for me. Once the first good ones went back overseas, I had to make do with a vet who never made a single correct diagnosis on our place - misdiagnosed an obvious abscess for "hip arthritis" - which doesn't come on suddenly and isn't lower limb lameness and doesn't get worse when you put point pressure on the sole of the hoof. But oh excuse me, he was the veterinarian, what would I know? The abscess burst out of the coronet two days later and untreated. Grrrrr. The farrier who happened to cut the mare's feet three weeks later said, "Oh, she had an abscess, look!" and I said, "Yeah, but the vet swore she didn't have one and it was hip arthritis!" and he went :rofl: and asked me who it was, and went :rofl: again when I told him. When I had a horse with cancer, he diagnosed "bad reaction to wormer" even though her discomfort preceded the routine worming with medicine she'd never reacted to before. How do you get a bad reaction to a wormer three days before you've actually wormed your horse?

Every horse with a long winter coat had Cushings, according to him - so I said to him, "All our steers must have Cushings too! Just look at them!" And the last time he was on the place was when Sunsmart had a cluster of lipomas in his umbilical area, which had dropped off when he rolled. We cleaned and refrigerated the specimen immediately (now it's in the freezer). A couple of small lipomas in the margin of the wound hadn't come off and I called the vet out, hoping he'd knock the horse out and clean up the wound edges. "Oh no! I can't do this outside an operating theatre!" which is weird, because horses are routinely castrated outside of the operating theatre and this procedure was less dicey than castration. Indeed, we had a facial tumour removed from a horse just lying in the grass 30 years ago, and that was far more complicated surgery than cleaning up a wound edge, but oh well... He used an elastrator ring on the biggest of the three remaining lipomas, which was about the size of a cherry, and did nothing to the two smaller ones, but told me my horse was terminal and I should be prepared to lose him within months. "What, from benign lipomas?" He said that my horse had invasive tumours. I didn't see any, and I knew what we had in the fridge. "Oh, that's not a lipoma, lipomas are soft!" Well, Mr Veterinary Surgeon, it was soft before I put it in the chiller, something about the Kinetic theory and all that. It was made of fat, had smooth margins, and didn't articulate with any of the other tissue - it was self-contained.

That was four years ago, and it was the last time that vet set foot on our place. My horse healed up uneventfully, thanks to good follow-up wound care rather than thorough work by the veterinarian, and had no recurrences, and didn't die. Eighteen months ago, I discovered another good horse vet from another district, and he's not just an excellent veterinarian, he's also a real horseman, and my horses like him.

/end rant

I hope you find a better vet somewhere, sometime. It's not nice living rural and not necessarily having good veterinarians...
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top