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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, need a bit of help. My 11 year old gelding has started twisting his hind legs when turning, and not just a little bit. I have attached photos. The text is there as this was sent to a friend on instagram, I've lost the original version so had to use this one. Any ideas what it could be?
I've had several vets out, currently waiting to book him in for an xray with our new vet. Previous two vets didn't help. One said locking stifle, other said weak muscles. Did all exercises that I was recommended and they didn't help. Have also attached photos from today, where he crossed his legs over while I was grooming him. Any ideas or advice would be much appreciated.
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1. From the perspective of what I am used to dealing with, you might have a hollistic vet/chiropractor look at him. He could have an uneven pelvis. The damage could have happened as innocently as rolling in the pasture or rolling in his stall, casting himself but getting himself free before anyone saw him.

2. It could also be something neurological:(

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Please don’t ride him until you get a diagnosis. It could not only be dangerous if he goes down but I suspect he is in a lot of discomfort.
 

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Just the description of twisting while he walks sounds like hock arthritis. However from the pictures it strikes me as more nefarious than that. Particularly the way he is standing looks neurological. A video would be very useful. Did any vets do a neuro exam? You can search for how to do a basic one yourself also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. From the perspective of what I am used to dealing with, you might have a hollistic vet/chiropractor look at him. He could have an uneven pelvis. The damage could have happened as innocently as rolling in the pasture or rolling in his stall, casting himself but getting himself free before anyone saw him.

2. It could also be something neurological:(

***
Please don’t ride him until you get a diagnosis. It could not only be dangerous if he goes down but I suspect he is in a lot of discomfort.
I've been advised to keep him exercised so just been taking him for walks inhand, no riding of course. He doesn't look like he is in any pain or discomfort. It is mainly when he turns that is the issue. Vets aren't too sure and have just been throwing different diagnosis' round, they've all said they have never seen anything like it so that has me worried, I have booked him in for chiro and acupuncture so hopefully that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just the description of twisting while he walks sounds like hock arthritis. However from the pictures it strikes me as more nefarious than that. Particularly the way he is standing looks neurological. A video would be very useful. Did any vets do a neuro exam? You can search for how to do a basic one yourself also.
No Neuro exam, all I've been hearing from the vets in the area is that they have no clue what is wrong exactly, they're all just guessing by this point, I am waiting for an x-ray slot to open up so we can check his hocks for any signs of arthritis as that was my guess also. I will try and get a video sometime this week and will attach it to this thread.
 

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Hi & welcome to the forum,

I'd personally be getting a good chiropractic vet(as opposed to just a 'horse chiro') out to him. They should have a reasonable idea if it's something neurological, or 'purely' physical too. Just from the pics, I wouldn't think it's locking stifle.
 

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If possible, try to find a Vet that specializes in lameness or sport's medicine. Have the Vet's said anything about ligaments? I hope you get some answers.
 

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What part of Canada are you in?

There are a lot of Canadian members on this forum, maybe they can help with finding a qualified vet. Maybe someone that is mobile.

I agree with @Palfrey regarding a lameness or sports medicine vet, ahead of my thought for a holistic/chiro vet:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
DSC_0696.JPG _DSC0202.jpg Another picture with him twisting his leg, and one of him having fun in the field, not even bothered by his leg! Think he's enjoying a "retired" life with only inhand walks bless him! I am based in south east England, but I will see if I can find a sport medicine or lameness vet here, thank you all for the help and such a nice welcome to the forum! Hoping I can get to the bottom of it all as I am starting to get a bit bored of the expensive vet bills with no progress!
 

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I used to ride a horse that did that. you could see his hocks sort of rolling toward the outside as he pushed off with each foot . It didn't seem to bother him, but he wore his shoes down fast, as the hoof itself is rotating significantly with each step. I don't know what is the cause of that, but if I were horse shopping, I would avoid that sort of movement, as it must cause more wear and tear on the hock, no?
 

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Will your gelding still step under himself for a hind end release? Or does he try to pivot on the rear left leg?

In July of this year my husband's horse started showing very similar symptoms but for reasons (retired broodmare) that do not apply to your gelding. I started first with a chiropractor and that fixed her up (took 1 session per month for 5 months). It ended up being nothing to do with her leg, the problem was entirely in her hip, pelvis, and spine near her hips.

Just like your horse, her rear left leg would twist when she walked AND she no longer wanted to step under herself she would just try to pivot on her slightly twisted rear left leg. Her leg never did twist as badly as your gelding's leg but that could be bc I was able to get the chiro out so fast.

If its not neurological I would be wondering if its something to do with his hips.
 

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Could you share some conformation shots of your gelding - with him squared up, from the front, hind, and sides?

I'd be curious if there is a glaring conformational flaw that could be contributing to the way he moves. I had a mare with hock arthritis (at 10!) that moved similarly to this, but she also ended up unexpectedly being euthanized from a neurological thing that we never "officially" diagnosed. I have also seen a mare that had such poorly conformed hind legs that she moved horrendously like this, and I believe had ringbone in one if not two of her joints.
 
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I have that but not to that extreme with many drafts and crosses that are on the drafter end.
 

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Hey guys, need a bit of help. My 11 year old gelding has started twisting his hind legs when turning, and not just a little bit. I have attached photos. The text is there as this was sent to a friend on instagram, I've lost the original version so had to use this one. Any ideas what it could be?
I've had several vets out, currently waiting to book him in for an xray with our new vet. Previous two vets didn't help. One said locking stifle, other said weak muscles. Did all exercises that I was recommended and they didn't help. Have also attached photos from today, where he crossed his legs over while I was grooming him. Any ideas or advice would be much appreciated. View attachment 1105937 View attachment 1105938 View attachment 1105938 View attachment 1105935 View attachment 1105935 View attachment 1105936
 

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Did you get this resolved.He looks to have a very classic EPM stance. Leg crossing, hind end weakness all signs.
 

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Hi, any updates on how your horse is doing? My 27 year old is showing similar movements recently. Im not sure if it’s his arthritis or more.
Thank you
 

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Hi, did you get any further with your investigations? My pony is doing the same as yours. It almost looks as if she has dislocated her legs. I have contacted an equine chiropractor to come out and check her. She has been on box rest for 5 weeks as she showed mild clinical signs of laminitis (I noticed she had a slightly shortened stride on her hind leg but when the vet came she didn’t have any sensitivity to hoof testers and only a very mild digital pulse could be found on the front. (No lameness on the front at all). The night the vet cane, her nearside hind hock was also hot. Feet were xrayed and trimmed and she is sound at walk and trot but doing bunny hop cantering and stands and turns in her stable in a really odd way. Also when she walks she twists her feet/leg. I wonder whether in looking at laminitis we have completely missed something else. Any ideas welcome. Many thanks.
 

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Hi did you ever find an answer for your boy? My mare has done this since a yearling and is now 7 and going through the joys of a full vet lameness work up, she is a little irregular in the hind end and seem a bit weak behind but is otherwise fine. We don't have EPM in this country and the vet isn't too concerned about her saying that she should be able to keep working but she always stands with her legs crossed and walks like your boy.
 

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To the last posters, seems OP has 'left the building', not bothered to come back & answer questions or anything.

@Sarahpot, it sounds like your horse has a definite problem that's not laminitis(whether or not 'mild' lami was also an issue or not). As you wrote this 2 months ago, did you get it resolved yet? If not, I'd have been keeping on trying other body experts to see if I could find the prob/answer.

@amber, did you ever get a chiropractic vet or other body specialist to look at her? As, unless your vet has specialised in bodywork, they may not have a lot of knowledge specifically about that - just like a GP doc isn't a back specialist, but would refer you to a chiro or physio or such. If not, possibly too late now to make any changes, as such a long term prob will have caused bone changes, likely permanent long before now, but def worth a try, maybe at least prevent it getting worse with good management. Dunno where in Oz you are, but if you're in the SE, you may have heard of a well renowned vet chiro called Ian Bidstrup - he lectures around the country & people bring their horses from even Qld to see him. It's common for babies to sustain injuries when birthing even, but often an easy fix when they're immature.
 

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To the last posters, seems OP has 'left the building', not bothered to come back & answer questions or anything.

@Sarahpot, it sounds like your horse has a definite problem that's not laminitis(whether or not 'mild' lami was also an issue or not). As you wrote this 2 months ago, did you get it resolved yet? If not, I'd have been keeping on trying other body experts to see if I could find the prob/answer.

@amber, did you ever get a chiropractic vet or other body specialist to look at her? As, unless your vet has specialised in bodywork, they may not have a lot of knowledge specifically about that - just like a GP doc isn't a back specialist, but would refer you to a chiro or physio or such. If not, possibly too late now to make any changes, as such a long term prob will have caused bone changes, likely permanent long before now, but def worth a try, maybe at least prevent it getting worse with good management. Dunno where in Oz you are, but if you're in the SE, you may have heard of a well renowned vet chiro called Ian Bidstrup - he lectures around the country & people bring their horses from even Qld to see him. It's common for babies to sustain injuries when birthing even, but often an easy fix when they're immature.
Hi loose,my vet thinks arthritis in the hock but also considered issues with her stifle. I had the farrier out to put back shoes on her but she wouldn’t permit it. For the next couple of weeks she was tricky about me picking up any of her feet but especially back ones. Vet gave me bute to give her but I stopped it as I didn’t see any particular improvement and she is now letting me pick up her feet although the back ones are still a bit tricky. She is being ridden, and is sound just intermittently shows this ‘not quite right’ movement in back legs. It’s a mystery. I had chiropractor out who said her back was very sore but she has been no different since she’s been. Going to try a physio/massage next. She seems very happy in herself.
 
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