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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last year around this time I started a thread asking about clippers. I was thinking about maybe partially clipping Pony. This year, I'm pretty sure I am going to do it. It's supposed to hit 85 tomorrow, and Pony has been getting really hot. I think our winter is mostly over already.

Reading through that thread again, I see a lot of people really liked Wahls, so that's the way I'm going to go. I was really hoping to get something cordless, for various reasons. It looks like the thing about cordless clippers is that they are not going to be as powerful as corded clippers. Now, for my questions.
  1. Granted a cordless clipper isn't going to be as powerful, but right now all I want to clip is the underside of his neck and his chest. I figured there would be enough power to do that, right? I mean, he's a pony, but then again he's fat. If I end up wanting to completely clip him, I'll pay someone to do it.
  2. Since this isn't a lot of his body that would be clipped, and he's fat, it doesn't change anything with respect to how I would blanket him or not, right? Even if it gets cold, as long as it's not wet, I still wouldn't worry about putting a sheet on him. I mean, unless it got super cold. I just want to be sure this is correct. It's a 20-25 minute drive one way from my place, and I don't want to be going out every day to change sheets.

Thanks!
 

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You are clipping to give him a way to cool quickly with excercise or activity, exertion so yes, you will still be needing to blanket at times when you would have otherwise. It is not so great an area that you would need to blanket at all times though there may be days you could go either way. Wet or wind would be my deciding factor for those days. If sunny even with wind I would likely not. He will still sweat under the hair coat unclipped and you could see skin issues from fungus and such.
 

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Its not just the size of the area you want to clip, it is how dense the hair is where you want to clip....
Battery life loses some as soon as you turn the switch on, has a finite amount of time before it no longer clips but pulls and yanks the hair instead of cutting once the battery has worn down just enough it effect the outcome and how Pony will stand for the next time you come near with clippers.
Batteries also never charge as full as the first time...fact.

Underside of neck and chest might have me rethinking blanket/sheet or not honestly.
You are removing two areas of the body where regulation of warmth is significant...
Where do you check quickly for a over-heated horse...chest between the pectoral muscles.

I know many think battery is the way to go...
I know not for me..
I want to know the "engine" aka motor is going to run at a consistent speed, plodding through thick or thin coat which gives a more even cut and less chance of pulling, yanking and making my horse/pony miserable with a ouch.
Regardless of what machine do have 2 sets of blades minimum cause dull is a beast to use anyplace on the body clipping.
And if hot...you don't want to touch any animal with hot blades...
On top of that they are wicked expensive... :cautious:
🐴...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool, so I'll plan on going ahead and getting two sets of blades. Maybe I'll pick one of those areas (neck or chest) to trim first. I'll trim it and then maybe trim the other area next time I'm out there.

Alternately, I did also text the barn owner about her doing it. She offers full body clipping as a service, for a set fee. I asked her how much she'd charge for doing just his neck and chest. But I haven't heard back yet.
 

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I too am a huge fan of corded clippers - I never really understood the preference towards cordless. I personally don't think Wahl is the way to go. If you look up blogs and review videos of various clippers for body clipping, Andis and Oster rise to the top. I have the "Oster Turbo A5 Speed Clippers" available at Tractor Supply. Tractor Supply also sells the blades for them but they are overpriced. If you can wait for an Amazon delivery, I recommend getting the "Andis UltraEdge Detachable Clipper Blade", the #10 blade, I saved $5 per blade.

Depending on how thick his hair is, you may need more than two blades...I buzzed through two brand new blades on shiny clean Minnie when I clipped her. If you look closely on her shoulder, you can clearly see blade marks, which are partly from my inexperience with body clipping but also where the blades were running dull. I actually did most of her belly first, and I really think that the thickest hair in on their underside - this is where my blades went dull super fast.

PXL_20201111_235640821.MP.jpg


You'll also want to get a coolant, I use the "Wahl Professional Animal Blade Ice Coolant and Lubricant" also off of Amazon. It's only $9 for a can, and you don't have to stand around waiting for blades to cool off for as long.

As for blanketing, I didn't start blanketing Minnie until it was below 60F during the day, and that was only a lightweight blanket. After it went below 50F during the day, I went to the midweight, and only recently when it has been consistently under 35F during the day (and much cooler at night) has she needed a heavyweight blanket. Depending on how far you clip and how long you think you will have to blanket, I recommend getting a shoulder guard (sleazy is a common brand) as Minnie did end up having bald spots rub on her shoulders and chest (didn't happen when she had full hair and was blanketed).

I'm really happy that I clipped the section that I did on Minnie, though I think I didn't clip enough of Toofine (but I did his clip job before his Cushing's and becoming medicated). I think clipping is really on an individual basis - Minnie has done okay with a partial clip, but I think Toofine will really benefit from a full clip job next winter. Toofine just gets way too warm having a partial clip AND being blanketed AND being medicated for Cushing's - he's in a midweight blanket right now in 5-15F weather and I've been tempted to put on his lightweight with how warm he feels.

PXL_20210130_195146355.jpg


Just a small note on paying others to clip your horses - I'd proceed with caution. Most people that I've ever seen clip their own horses (private owners and popular trainers) tend to be impatient and sometimes cruel to get a horse to stay still. Training will always be better than twitching, tying, drugging, etc etc. I'd encourage you to get Pony good with the clippers all over yourself and once you know he will stand quietly, then I'd consider hiring someone else to do it. I don't allow others to bully my horses into submission, when a little bit of work on my end resolves any need for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In the thread from last year, people seemed to pretty consistent like Wahl. People didn't like Oster -- said they were noisy and vibrated too much.
 

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In the thread from last year, people seemed to pretty consistent like Wahl. People didn't like Oster -- said they were noisy and vibrated too much.
You can take what you want from this, but this was Minnie's first time ever being body clipped, and before this I roached her mane with Wahl clippers. She was pretty anxious and explosive with the Wahl clippers, and when I switched to the Oster's she stood quiet as a mouse, munching on hay.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I appreciate it. Maybe I'll start a poll on what brands people liked. My problem is that I feel, deep down, that if I do enough research I can find the one correct answer to any question, and then I often get decision paralysis when I can't find that one answer. After reading through my thread from last year, I thought Wahl would be the answer. I'm starting to feel paralyzed again LOL.
 

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Wow. After reading all this I am glad I payed my trainer $75 to trace clip Arago. Yes, now he is blanketed every night in Oregon. He also wears the turnout when turned out when it's rainy and cold. I do not like the way he looks with big patches of hair missing. But he did resemble a black yak before and took a really long time to dry after being worked. This is better for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yeah... I'm starting to really hope the barn owner comes back with a number for me. I can just have her do it and not worry about it.

I would like to work Pony a little harder, but I hate all of that sweat he gets in that area, and he always seems to be hot even with a little work. I'm hoping that this will make working a little easier for him.
 

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I think asking about clippers is a lot like asking what bit the best - each person is going to have their own answer.

I currently use a pair of oster clipmasters.. they are ancient, massive, vibrate, and are loud, but they do the job in 1/4 the time and with no need to change blades, on a heavy-coated horse which was not bathed first. I had been using a pair of Andis with a wider 10 blade after killing my Wahl clippers the first year I used them to body clip. And all of those are corded clippers - I cannot fathom body clipping with the cordless Wahl clippers I have as it would take all day.

I got a great tip about keeping blades cool and sharp from a friend who grooms professionally - don't use blade cooling sprays, instead use clipper oil on the blades periodically (like every 20 minutes). Making that change was MAGIC and I wonder if it would have saved my original Wahls.

Phin is an old pro at being clipped:
1108882


But this year was Link's first experience and clippers are not his favorite thing. I wrote about the whole experience in my journal.
1108881
 

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As far as doing it yourself vs paying someone, I'd recommend paying someone. When I had my guy done for the first time he was quite nervous. The lady I hired was quick and the clippers were well maintained with backups. Plus she did really clean lines.
If I tried to do it myself, it would have taken 2x as long, or even multiple days, and I wouldn't have been able to hold him. He was too nervous to stand in the cross ties but standing in the isle he was good.
Look outside your barn if needed. Lots of people out there offering clipping services. I did a chaser clip and I think it was $85 with milage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I did it myself two years ago, borrowing someone else's clippers. I had no idea what I was doing and the result was really ugly. He did great, though. I'm pretty sure it was the first time he had ever been clipped.

But I am leaning toward having her do it, if she will.
 
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If you are going to do the job yourself, take the extra few days and order from a reputable source blades in the number you want, and decide what you want for a blade wash, lube and coolant.
Most stores do not stock except the most common blades and charge a fortune for them...
Take the time and don't rush...if it takes 2 days or longer, so be it ..just don't stress, and when you are relaxed so shall Pony take cues from you and be more relaxed like you. 😉

I think in time you are going to be purchasing clippers to do the job yourself..
Might I suggest you go to a store and listen to the noise they make just "idling" so you know the quiet and can only imagine when now working they will make more noise. Every clipper machine also has a balance to it that must match your hand and arm so not exhausting to use, handle and clip any animal...
My other suggestion is to look at the depth of hair left on the real body clipping machine that professional clipper/groom use to do this job cause it is different length than those #10 people often think are great...
In essence to me the #10 is a bit to close and short a cut and can leave the animal with abrasion rubs from tack ...areas where till the coat grows in in about 2 weeks you can have razor stubble burns.
Pony is dark so not going to be easily seen but if he develops them he will be a cranky boy to ride and groom...his skin hurts when he has "burns"...
I did the comparisons at one time of large animal clipper blades to the cut depth of #10 and the conversion came to be a #5 or #7 needed...
It can make a difference in comfort of the animal...and in what the finished job appears as immediately.
If you are determined to do a #10 depth, then invest in T-84 blades as the depth of hair cut is the same, but the blade width is wider = less time and passes to get the job completed.

One of the most important things I can share is...take good care, like excellent care of this machine.
After a full body clipping, have it serviced by a authorized service center and the blades...get them professionally sharpened so they are ready for the next time.
Blades can only be really sharpened a few times at most so expect actual replacement more not less as once a sharpening done, the factory edges are forever gone and dull happens faster.
The dirtier the animals clipped the harder the machine is made to work...servicing is like a oil change for your car...good care gives longevity.
🐴...
 

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(I will quietly say I prefer my Osters over the Wahls I've had)...

I second that oiling the clippers is better than using the cooling spray.
When I have done a whole horse I've never managed it in one session with one pair of clippers. At some point they just get too hot. I rotate between two. For a trace clip one pair should work fine.

It is definitely coat density that counts. Clipping a full size Arab is easier and faster than a mini horse. Their coats are super dense.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
OK @horselovinguy you have opened up a whole new set of questions: what about blade size (depth?)? You recommend not going with a #10 blade -- what would you recommend? Are blades interchangeable, so if the clippers I get come with a #10 I could just buy another one and put that in instead?

And when you mention these T-84 blades, that's the width? So I could buy blades by both depth(?) and width? I would need to specify both?

I mentioned I clipped Pony two years ago. That seemed so straightforward. Someone offered to let me borrow her clippers (I now realize she was a saint LOL) and I just clipped him. He was fine. I did an ugly job but who cares. I expect to do another ugly job this time, too. The point is to get the fur off so he won't be so hot.
 

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I'm going to answer in your post so less confusing...here comes a large book in details... ☕🍩..something to eat and snack on while you read...
You do need to "click to expand" to see that book of writing...

OK @horselovinguy you have opened up a whole new set of questions: what about blade size (depth?)? You recommend not going with a #10 blade -- what would you recommend? Are blades interchangeable, so if the clippers I get come with a #10 I could just buy another one and put that in instead?

If you borrow a machine, then you purchase several sets of blades that fit your needs and thank who ever lends you the machine...
If you decide to purchase a machine, regardless of brand/manufacturer that uses "snap-on" blades, aka A-5 blades, yes all blades are interchangeable.

There are different steels used and the process of hardening the precision cut of the blades that can have a blade last a bit longer before it dulls...
Of course, those differences also can make costs change and depending upon which manufacturers brand of blade you buy also effects the cost...but A-5 blades will fit Andis, Oster, Wahl and any other brand..A-5 blades are interchangeable.


And when you mention these T-84 blades, that's the width? So I could buy blades by both depth(?) and width? I would need to specify both?
Only certain number blades are available in several width choices...
#10 come regular width and wide, that is the T-10.
Then there is the T-84 blade...same idea of wider cutting path but it also leaves more hair with not as close a shave done.

When you look at replacement blades the higher the number blade the closer the shave to the skin...so a #50 is surgical close cut.
A #10 is a "general purpose" blade that today many who want to use a medium duty clipper, such as the A5...
Those who do this do not realize there are other blades that fit the "horse clipper" and accept that which is easily accessible instead of looking a bit further and pre-planning the body clip planned.
A bit of investigating will also tell you that the real machine intended/made for body clipping of horses is the large animal clippers now made by all the big clipper producers who copied the Oster line which was/is also Sunbeam.
Those are the machines I learned to body clip horses with and yes, the depth of hair removed is different and my opinion and that of professional horse grooms who are old-school trained will tell you your horse is done a dis-service clipped at a #10, they are scalped and to close a cut which can and does irritate the sin follicles of the animal for several weeks as regrowth of hair must and does take place.

A large animal clipper is considerably more expensive, and dedicated blades for specific animals because all kinds of livestock get clipped for shows...
A link to just one place who sells a large collection of machines and assorted blades...
Many places sell clippers and blades, doing some comparison price shopping might be helpful but pay attention to details such as cord length cause it makes a difference...
So, my large animal body clippers are Oster brand.
They use a 83AU & 84AU blade set which clips to 2 mm depth.
In comparison, a A5 #10 blade clips to 1.5mm depth..
So, as you can see just with those 2 examples there is what become a significant difference in coat left on the animal or removed.

Now, if you are going to use a A5 clipper which if you not own, purchase a equine use model that has 2 speeds....there are several models to choose from for equines...
***
So, a A5 blade now opens many more choices of blade depth that near no one has heard of...
A T-10 blade is a wider cutting path but the same depth of 1.5mm
A T-84 blade is also available with that wider cutting path but leaves 2.4 mm of hair left...
That is nearly an extra centimeter of depth of coat...that reduces irritation and the scalped look that also allows easy sunburn of the animal.
Now to add more choices in A-5 blades...
I would if my horse and using a medium duty machine such as the A-5, ...
A #7 blade leaves a coat 3.2 mm long
A #5 blade leaves 6.3 mm or 1/4" coat left.
So, if body clipping any part of my own horse using a A-5 machine...
T-84 blade because of width, then if a regular width blade I would at this time of the year use a #5 as winter nasties are still happening so protection but not excessive coat overheating the animal.
A happy medium to me achieved in reducing bulk but leaving enough the animal has protection from weather miseries if caught outdoors till you can get to him to offer blanket protection.

When you see pictures of a freshly clipped animal done with a #10 versus the AU83/84 blade or the T-84 blade you would understand why I say no to #10.
Do your research and make sure you know what it is you are going to do to Pony and what he will endure while waiting several weeks for his coat to regrow some for the protection he has now lost to his chest, throat and neck and if you really remove so he cools, not sweat so much you will be doing a bit of his girth line too...now what you remove you need to figure out how to protect against winter cold as it is only early February and we need to get to mid-April for weather to change and stay predictable with fewer cold snaps here in the southern states you live in too.
I just would not "scalp" the animal since making those decisions beforehand is possible.


*** When you purchase your own machine purchase Equine intended/purposed machines as there is a difference.
Barbers, hair stylists use the same A-5 machines housing but the motors are different since human hair is not the same as dog, horse, cattle or sheep/goat so make sure the machine is "Equine intended use.." and cord length is often shorter on the other machines...


I mentioned I clipped Pony two years ago. That seemed so straightforward. Someone offered to let me borrow her clippers (I now realize she was a saint LOL) and I just clipped him. He was fine. I did an ugly job but who cares. I expect to do another ugly job this time, too. The point is to get the fur off so he won't be so hot.
The best part about clipping is it grows out and disappears in time, so who cares what it really looks like as long as it accomplishes what you needed it to do as the time of shaving the animal.
If you were going to be in a show ring, that is different but for your pleasure riding and enjoyment, make Pony comfortable is the purpose of driving yourself crazy!
😉
OK...me done.

I hope you will now be a better informed consumer when you do decide to invest in your own machine.
I've done a lot of research to gather and share what I shared.
I also was blessed to have friends who explained, shared with me why certain things are done for the animals benefit and comfort.
Planning for certain activities knowing what winter brings to our animals in furry coats grown, and us wanting to ride and not have a soggy animal chilled...takes some pre-planning for us to do best for them.
It is all your decision as your animal, your decision and needs need met for you and them.
What the end result looks like is just a small part of the equation...it is the practical application of what you propose to do that is most important for Pony's comfort.

Regardless of what you do about a machine, you will be purchasing blades, possibly oil or cooling/disinfecting/cleaning lube in a spray can..
Price shop can save you much and give you many more options than what you find in a store or even some catalog or online places...search carefully.
Now...:censored:
If you have more "??", just ask.
As always, what we do and think is correct is always open to personal opinion and all are entitled to what they believe.
🐴...
 

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I bet you'll do a good job. In my opinion, the main reason people get a funny looking job is just because they didn't "mow all the lawn" as I think of it. Basically, if you just clip so the clippers are resting on the horse, so the hair is all taken off at the shortest level for the blades you are using, it will all end up nicely even. If you leave tracks between like you skipped part of the lawn, or lift the clippers off the horse, it becomes uneven. It's not really art, it's just thoroughness, which is why I can clip a horse very nicely with very little artistic skill but lots of stubbornness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks @horselovinguy . I read through everything you wrote and then thought, I will come back and re-read it after I've had my coffee, LOL. Lots of good information there.
 
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Thanks @horselovinguy . I read through everything you wrote and then thought, I will come back and re-read it after I've had my coffee, LOL. Lots of good information there.
You definitely need that coffee and something to eat for this one...

My book got ridiculously long and I did omit and condense a few times...
As said, ask if you need clarification and absolutely hope others chime in and not only me offer my thoughts and opinion as others also have reason for why they do as they do.
🐴...
 
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