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Good video. Thanks.

Very much like how I do it, with the exception of knots on the nose. I don't do those. I always have two or three in my trailer to give away if someone suddenly needs one.

Oddly, my own horse wears a nylon web halter. Those are not as popular. No one accidentally picks it up!
 

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I use a rope halter for training and a leather halter for trailering/shipping. The rope provides more control for training or leading and I ride with the rope halter under my bridle so I always have it available as a "get down" rope for leading instead of pulling on the reins/bit when afield. I use a leather halter for trailering because the wide strap of the leather is more easily broken by the horse in case of emergency and the horse "needs" to be able to escape or break loose.
 
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Beginners question: why is a rope halter better than one like this (photo)? My main trainer uses the clips ones and my other the rope.
Horse Head Eye Working animal Horse tack
 

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@Luna’s rider - The rope halters are thinner and give sharper cues to the horse. Add knots on the nose band and that increases.

It's similar, in my opinion, to needing a chain under the noseband of a web or leather halter. There are times when that might be helpful and times when it's unnecessary.

Rope halters gained broad popularity when some western riding magazines started featuring working hands using them. Rope is easy and cheap to keep around. A person could whip one up pretty quickly as needed.

In addition to the ones I make just to give away, I make and keep a few with a larger muzzle opening. Those are for putting on a horse who is wearing a bridle. My polo friends sometimes have to have a horse, fully tacked, tied at the trailer. And for when really little kids want to ride "all by myself" and need ponied.
 

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I’d probably do much better with a simple diagram. The lady’s hands blocked the view of how to tie the knot.

I probably don’t tie one “properly”. I just get it where I want it and tie a half hitch, two if I have a lot of tail leg over.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Nylon and leather halters create flat pressure, and it makes communication 'fuzzy'. If you have a horse who is disrespectful at all, they will lean on a leather or nylon halter and can be quite a pain to handle on the ground, that is the only way a rope halter can at all be like a chain in that it can make leaning on pressure uncomfortable if you have a more stubborn dull disrespectful horse. I won't use chains on mine, they are too severe and unlike rope halters, chains don't offer communication, only pressure when you want them OFF the halter. Primarily, for training, the communication and cues from a good rope halter with correctly placed knots is unparalleled.

Absolutely agree with Elessar, for trailering it's safest to use a halter that will break (i.e. nylon halters) or a breakaway tie of some sort. We use tie rings in our trailers when we use our rope halters.
Beginners question: why is a rope halter better than one like this (photo)? My main trainer uses the clips ones and my other the rope. View attachment 1119097
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Explanation of rope halters -- and not all rope halters are created equal. There are a LOT of rope halters out there (and most of the ones they sell at the feed stores) that do not offer great communication, they are more clumsy and do not have great feel in the rope, which means the communication is not as good as it could and should be. Great rope halters are not cheap, because the rope they are made from is not cheap. Used plenty of both over the years!

 
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