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Discussion Starter #1
So I have a question for everyone...when I first got Rodeo, he would stand tied great! Of course, someone was always there, so he always behaved. Well today, I tied him to the fence of the arena. Had the arena gate closed, and I just wanted to see how he would do. He does great when I am there with him. Stands perfect, doesnt move, doesnt flinch, doesnt take a step. He'll also stand there without being tied without any problems. I could just walk to the middle of the barn, and give him a full grooming with the lead rope draped around his neck.

Well today, when I tied him to the fence of the arena, I started to walk into the barn, before I could even leave the arena, I turned around, and he was pulling straight back on the rope. Apparently something had spooked him. The knot released, and as soon as the rope was loose, he stood there perfectly still, let me go up to him, and retie the quick release knot.

As I was walking away I turned to check on him, and somehow he managed to get the rope loose enough to where he had the rope up the side of his head, and around his ears, much like a halter. He came out of that situation just fine, thank god.....but it made me start thinking....

Should I be working on having him tied to where he doesnt need me standing there with him? Or should I not work on it since he doesnt have a problem with it when Im there?

Also to add.....I have had him tied before, and walked away to where he couldnt see me, and he didnt have a single problem.

Im just curious to see what everyone else thinks on this topic....thanks!!!
 

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if it was just once i wouldn't worry about it from a training perspective. maybe learn a different knot that won't come undone or loosen under pressure though.
 

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Just remember not to positively reinforce bad behavior such as pulling back. A lot of times we accidently 'praise' them for being bad, without even thinking about it. (for example, Sour used to untie her knot when she was waiting for me, and I would return to her to fix it. She learned that untying herself would bring me back.)

Like the other poster said, if its just this one time, I wouldn't worry. If he does it again, though- you might want to start working with him on standing nice while you're gone.

You could do this by 'leaving' (hiding where he cant see you) him for a few minutes. If he pulls back or dances or does anything unfavorable- don't go to him. As soon as he calms down (for atleast ten seconds) come back out of hiding, praise him, and give him a little bit of a treat (even a little grain would work, or a handful of grass.) He'll soon associate patience with feed, and you can gradually increase the time that he stands. He's a baby so it's not a huge deal right now, but it can turn into a mess if you don't correct it now.

Make sure you have a knot that he can't pull/undo though! Don't want him going on scavanger hunts for you! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the posts and tips!!!

It was the first time doing it, but he did it twice back to back, the only reason I went back to him was 1)the first time, the rope had come undone, and 2)he got the rope tangled in the goofiest, strangest way Ive ever seen a horse get tangled before.

Thanks again for the tips though guys!! I was just trying to figure out if this is something I should work on if it continues.....from what I was always told, a horse shouldnt be tied/left alone unsupervised, so I wasnt sure if it was that big of a deal. But then I thought about the possibility of me in the far future(lol) of going to a show, and how bad it would be if he had a little tantrum due to me leaving him.

Thanks again!
 

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We don't leave ours left alone, but we do tie them by themselves, with us doing other things around them- and we expect them to behave and not throw hissy fits about not getting any attention when we're busy ;) it's not fun to have an attention-hogging horse!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We don't leave ours left alone, but we do tie them by themselves, with us doing other things around them- and we expect them to behave and not throw hissy fits about not getting any attention when we're busy ;) it's not fun to have an attention-hogging horse!
Very true Endiku!!! Hes actually fine for letting me do things around him...I dont know if he thought I was leaving, leaving him, and just reacted to that or what. I just wanted to kind of walk to where I could see him, but not be right there.

As far as doing things, I can walk to the other side of the barn, sweep around him, and much more, and hes just fine. Like I said, not sure if he thought I was actually going or not, lol
 

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What is the point of tying a knot that your horse can untie?
 

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The blocker tie ring idea is actually really good. We have one, and it makes for a very fast, very easy way to tie our horses.
 

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We are very careful where we tie horses. I always tie a 'green' horse to a place that is at least 5 feet high. [My regular training spot is 6 1/2 feet high. It is a horseshoe welded to the side of a big 300 barrel oilfield tank. It is smooth steel and weighs about 5000 pounds.]

Next, never tie a horse to anything that can move. This means portable panels that make up a round pen, gates, flimsy fences, etc. Never -- even broke horses.

Never leave a horse unattended in cross-ties. That is not the same thing as 'tying' one.

Tie a horse short enough that it cannot get its head closer than 1 1/2 to 2 feet above the ground. If you're grooming and saddling, they should be even shorter.

We have a 5 foot high pipe and cable arena fence. I tie broke horses to it but not green ones. Green horses that are apt to set back will always come forward and stick a foot or two through the cables. When I tie one to the arena fence, the rope is about 3 feet from the fence to his chin.

When I have a horse that I consider 'broke'. I will not hesitate to tie him over-night at a 2 or 3 day trail-ride. I tie one with a hay-net and a water bucket hung up on the trailer. I tie one long enough when I am right there that its nose can barely touch the ground so it can pick up loose hay. If I am not right there, I tie it a foot or so shorter so it can lay down if it wants but cannot get a foot over the rope.

When I am getting a horse ready for long pack trips or hunting trips, I break them to a '25 foot picket rope'.

I am of the opinion that every horse should tie solidly and quietly for however long you want it to be tied if you want to consider the horse 'broke'.
 

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Tie him and leave him for awhile. Come back to him when he's calm.
 

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Adding to the tie list I woudl say NEVER tie a horse and expect the tie rope/lead rope snap to hold him. ALWAYS use a bowline knot creating a neck rope with the rope running through the halter ring to the very very secure thing you are tying him too. If you do not know how to tie a bowline (it does not slip and so won't strangle the horse).

A neck rope is a rope that is a loop that goes around the horse's neck and is placed right behind the ears along the crown piece of the halter. The free end goes through the halter ring and then ties to the solid object.

Tie no lower than the horse's withers. Tie no longer than 1-2 feet of slack (horse should not reach teh ground with his nose).

A horse tied insecurely or who breaks either the object tied to or the equipment ties WITH will learn to be afraid of tying or to pull back and break the tie.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the helpful posts!!! This is something we will be working on for sure!! Thanks again!!!
 
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