The Horse Forum banner

Ugly foot!

5923 Views 43 Replies 12 Participants Last post by  smrobs
We got a new horse yesterday- an amazing 16 year old QH gelding who has been-there and done-that, and is the perfect guy to really teach my kids the finer points of riding.

However, (is it just me, or with horses- is there always a "however"?. . .) he is chronically unsound because of a bad barbed wire fence accident seven years ago.
He is not head-bobbing,hoof-dragging lame, but there is a definite hitch in his gitalong.:wink:

I'm posting pictures of his hoof here, so that anyone with advice or experience with coronet-band hoof injuries can offer input.

He has been shod for riding (pretty much only summers) for the last 7 years. He moved from a damp footing pasture, but will now be on a dry rocky hillside.
He is noticeably better with an easyboot on, but I noticed the strap that holds it against the heel puts a lot of pressure against his heel bulb, which seems tender.

My plan is to have the front shoe pulled off his other forefoot (the shoe had already fallen off of his funky foot a couple months ago), and have a good barefoot trimmer get all his feet shaped and balanced however best to support his injured hoof. Ultimately I'd like to be trimming him myself- I trim my other horses- but I've never really delt with feet like this, so will be working with someone for now.
I will probably have to experiment with different hoofboots to find something that supports his hoof without putting undue pressure on the soft tissues surrounding it.

Umm. . . sorry for the nove!:oops: I'm kind of fascinated by hooves.









Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 44 Posts

· Banned
Joined
·
12,825 Posts
This poor boy most certainly looks like he has some nutritional issues that are not being met.

Wow.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
6,635 Posts
Poor guy. =[ I have no farrier-related input, except it's probably best to not shoe him. I can't imagine putting holes in an already torn up hoof. But you probably realize that if you are looking for a barefoot trimmer and horseboots. =]

Also, it wouldn't hurt to put him on a Biotin supplement. In fact, I think it would help him tremendously.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
22,319 Posts
It kinda makes me wonder if maybe he ended up with some kind of infection in the injury that is still lingering in that area. In all honesty, his hoof reminds me of people's feet when they have nasty nail fungus. The main reason why that comes to mind is that it looks kinda okay up near the coronet band but gets nasty looking as it starts to grow out. I might be totally off base but it could be worth looking into.
 

· Banned
Joined
·
5,892 Posts
My first horse had a pretty nasty band injury but it never got that bad. His was a back leg but it always had to be barefoot. If you needed a shoe, it had to be a glue on. The yucky growth is just so soft...it would have destroyed it had it had nails in it. This was ten years ago but he was on horseshoers secret and knox gelatin. It made his hooves grow strong and fast. He never took a lame step though. I think your boy could have a chance at a really good recovery if you find the right trimmer, the right nutrition and the right footing for him.

Good luck. Im totally subscribed...
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
Ooo thats not a nice foot id say with dedicated care time and farrier visits it could get reformed. It looks like yiu can peel the top later the hoof off like those with weak nails can do. Id definitely look into hoof supplements
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have no idea what he was getting to eat. We feed free choice grass hay and a little bit of whole oats. I'm thinking he will neet some joint supplements as well, because he "clicks" a lot when he moves. This foot definitely looks different than his other three, although all are splittong/cracking to some degree. Here's a picture of him, so you can see his other hooves and his overall condition.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
2,580 Posts
I have had several horses with coronet band injuries, but none that look like that!! There are two issues I see here that are contributing to his condition:

1.) Poor diet. Looks to me like he has not been getting the nutrients he needs from his diet for quite some time. Notice the poor hoof condition all around the hoof? It shouldn't look like that. Now that doesn't mean he hasn't been fed, just that he hasn't been fed a balanced diet. Biotin will definately help but bear in mind it will take around 6-12 months to entirely grow out all that old, cruddy hoof. A good solid diet with plenty of protein, even supplements like vitamin E and selenium will help to grow a healthy hoof.

2.) Poor hoof care. You can see at the top of the hoof where the original site of injury was and it is relatively minor. The reason so much hoof has broken away is related to poor diet as I mentioned above but also because this horse hasn't appeared to have regular, quality farrier treatment. As he is at the moment, he may need shoes to help support that hoof and prevent further damage. This won't always be the case, when the new, healthy hoof has grown back it should be strong enough to enable him to go without shoes provided you won't be asking for too much lateral work given the site of the coronet band injury.

I know you have just got him and hope this doesn't all sound so doom and gloom but with time that hoof will look much much better, you will barely even notice the coronet band injury!
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Great input everyone, thanks! I'm really hopeful that we can get him feeling much better. He is really such a gem, and will be well worth the added attention/maintainence that he needs. I'm really going to try to avoid putting shoes on, unless they are glue-on, because I'm loathe to add to the crumbly instability of the hoof wall. I will definitely be doing my nutrition homework, so hopefully get himlined out on the best course for growing in some healthy hooves!
 

· Banned
Joined
·
12,825 Posts
He is a round boy, isn't he?

It might be worth pulling some blood and checking to make sure his levels are OK in general.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Pete Ramey's website is amazing! I'd never looked at it before tonight, and after seeing the address in Loosie's signature, while reading another thread about cracked hooves, I just checked it out, and OH MY GOODNESS what a wealth of information!!!!
I am so excited to begin the rehab process on this guy's feet. :D I've also been doing a little research about nutrition, and will be sending a sample of our hay to be analyzed as a place to start- I'm not sure if having bloodwork done would also be beneficial, as the horse just moved from one place to another, and will be on a completely different food source. . . How long will it take to see the effects of his new forage in his blood analysis? Would the base/starting point that he is at now, nutritionally, effect his ability to metabolize/utilize his new food sources?
Also, I will be soaking his hooves in an antifungal bath, because as smrobs had mentioned, that is a big part of what looks to be going on.
Is it ridiculous to be as excited as I am about a funky, nasty-looking horse foot?!. . . . hahaha :D
My daughter had her first riding lesson on him this evening, and he is so incredible. I'm definitely a little stupid in love with this guy! I seriously can't wait to see hisfeet a year from now. . . .
 

· Banned
Joined
·
5,892 Posts
How exciting for you! I love it when there is a prospect of a serious turn around! Glad your daughter loves him too. Kids horses are, IMO, born not made. If hes a good one, even with the bum foot, hes worth every penny.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
^For sure! He is so patient, but he also really responds to things done correctly, so he ignores the random kicking and pulling, but responds to aids really lightly- he is like a horsemanship barometer or something- my daughter gets instant feedback from the horse on what she's doing right and wrong, and that is invaluable! :D
 

· Premium Member
Joined
·
24,143 Posts
Hi,

Haven't read all replies & don't have time for a full one now, but if the shoe fell off this hoof 2 months ago & he's still wearing the other, he's WAAAAY overdue for a trim for starters. Secondly I agree with others, that diet & nutrition are also big factors. It appears that he's laminitic, so firstly I wouldn't be feeding him grain or any other sugary/starchy feeds. A good complete supplement is also a good idea, as biotin is only one of many nutrients he is likely lacking in.

I noticed your signature quote, so you're obviously familiar with Ramey to some degree:wink:. I'd get onto his site hoofrehab.com for starters & learn all you can there, follow links to learn more.

I wouldn't worry about the easyboot strap, altho he may have extra sensitive heels because they're likely thrushy as well as contracted & unconditioned from wet, soft ground. I'd be treating the whole hoof(ves) for infection, as it is almost definitely in the torn/broken quarter which is contributing to it's lack of healing.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
650 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Loosie, thanks for your reply. I had heard of Pete Ramey, but only checked out his website after seeing it in your sig. . . . I am officially hooked! (changed my sig after reading that tonight on his site because I loved that quote!) What a wealth of info!! I just brought the new horse home yesterday, and am hoping to get someone decent out to pull the shoe and trim early next week. Meantime, he is eating only grass hay, until I find out more about what his specific nutritional needs are. I'm excited about the chance to learn from his feet! I've been trimming my other horse's feet for about a year, but pretty much they wear them down on their own very well, so there's not much to it. . . this is kinda exciting! :D
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top