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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am bringing my reining gelding at nine, not over trained, passed local vet check, but still recommended scope, to an equine vet. His attitude is progressively worse, some times cinchy, and over all depressed. Last chiropractic work ups were good, but his attitude is down hill. I did a few checks for ulcers at local vets suggestion.... no change even with ulcergaurd treatment for a little over a week. I stopped treatment a no signs... BUT his attitude seems more and more down with time. Pins ears at other horses more, doesn't approach people as often, swishy tail, cranky look, stands alone from other horses... ideas?
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Reevaluate the relationship with him.
When you pull him from his stall or paddock is it strictly business matters?
What does he have to look forward to when he sees people? Work?
 

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And you have another thread about same problem with same horse. Sounds like he needs a good vet check if current vet isnt figuring it out find a new one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Current vet doesn't have the diagnostic tests needed.

Feed: Free choice hay and small low calorie fed in the morning. He eats all the time and comes in for treats.

Go in pasture to scratch, work. Feed, etc the rest all approach me... curious critters. All the horses are very friendly...

See other post for more...
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My main reason for posting is because I want ideas on what I should have the vet check. The equine hospital is four hours away... so repeat trips are expensive. What should I have them check while I am there? Scope and what else is recommended. I don't want to miss anything else I should have checked. The vet is a chiropractor too.... I will probably have him adjusted just in case he is out at all
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As I said above, read up on Lyme disease also, if any symptoms fit, it's worth testing. Chiro is a great idea in any case. And the ulcer/ hind gut acidosis definitely.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
How do they test hind gut acidosis? Lymes I read up on and friends horses have lymes he has no signs of that
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·

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In general a low sugar/ starch feed will be of big help, same with hay. Grass hay can be very high in sugars and starch, depending on where it's from and when it's cut and the drying conditions. Alfalfa is generally lower in sugar/ starch, and unless he had issues with it, would be a good choice, since it also buffers the stomach acids.
Since he was at different trainers all the time, you didn't have much influence on what he has been fed, a few examples being Strategy (28%NSC), or Omolene (45%NSC). You want to stay below 15%. Then add that some trainers think, a hay belly is hindering performance, and restrict it to the bare minimum. Perfect set up for ulcers.
Now that you have him home, and he's on free choice hay already, maybe just adding a little alfalfa and a ration balancer will be the first step in the right direction, alongside with an ulcer treatment. You can try a handful of Tums... If his attitude changes, then you can pretty much bet he's got ulcers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks, the vet is coming out next week to run blood work to check any other possibilities and then if that is clear.... off to the animal hospital for a scope. My vet said with our care and low stress environment she would be surprised he has an ulcer, but said her trail gelding has one so it is possible...

His main stressor is the stall. A local trainer suggested that he had a bad experience he relates with the stall that I may not know about. He are going to do some work on making the stall a happy restful place.

I am working on it.

It makes a person wonder how a none stress horse all of a sudden became anxious in the stall out of the blue... it started after my mom's mare had a seizure in the paddock with him at training... carotid artery burst and she did pass away... (NOT the trainers fault an old injury we didn't know about) The trainer removed him and put him in a stall. I doubt this is the cause... the trainer said he was fine after.... when he got home he went ballistic looking for her...

Next show he was upset when alone in pen (my mom borrowed my other mare to show, so when rode her away he got upset) and we did some buddy sour work

This whole factor did not dawn on me until talking with the trainer, but I doubt this is cause of the stall/left by himself issues but who knows

I am working on behavioral and vet work
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Yeah, big mistake removing him. I noticed if they get a chance to check out the body they will take it in stride. They understand. I had two go this way over the years, in the herd on pasture, gave them time to say good bye and nobody even turned around our called, or looked in the empty stall. He didn't get a chance to understand and it probably still sticks with him.

I would try the Tums.... If he improves after taking them, you can go ahead and treat.
Another thing you can look into is Bach Flower Rescue Remedy. I had some amazing results with that.
 
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