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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What does everyone feed to their ulcer prone horses?

My gelding is currently fed alfalfa pellets, 1 and 1/2 cup of Purina Outlast and 24/7 hay. I am going to try 24/7 turnout with him tonight and see how that goes, since he's been outside during the day and inside at night.

My local tractor supply seems like they're always sold out of Outlast, so I'm looking for some recommendations for other ulcer preventative supplements!

Thanks everyone! :)
 

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I feed alfalfa hay 6 lbs alfalfa pellets 4 lbs both are divided into two feedings. Plus u gard concentrated powder.

Seems to work so far. Did the purina outlast worked ok for my horse ,but the u gard seems to have same results for less $$$.

I've tried marshmello root ,aloe vera waste of money made no difference at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I feed alfalfa hay 6 lbs alfalfa pellets 4 lbs both are divided into two feedings. Plus u gard concentrated powder.

Seems to work so far. Did the purina outlast worked ok for my horse ,but the u gard seems to have same results for less $$$.

I've tried marshmello root ,aloe vera waste of money made no difference at all.
That's the supplement I've been looking at is the U-Guard! I just need something to prevent the ulcers from coming back. How do you like it compared to the Outlast?
 

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Ive just looked at the Outlast spec sheet and I can't see any reason to buy it if you're already feeding Alfalfa as a source of calcium for its antacid properties.
It contains magnesium which is also an antacid and seems to help with stress but its more cost effective to buy a straight magnesium supplement and feed that along with the alfalfa

I use U-Gard for a horse that's been through stress or is on medication that puts them at risk of developing ulcers, its always proven to be effective - for a more serious problem you'd need to use it alongside a course of Omeprazole. Apart from the usual antacids, it contains aloe vera which seems to help the healing process and Glycine which has a buffering effect that raises the Ph level in the stomach.

For general maintenance, having access to good hay or grazing 24/7 is generally all you need to reduce ulcer risks. Alfalfa should be enough of a calcium source, I feed magnesium as a supplement and also feed soaked sugar beet because its a good source of pectin which is also a good buffer. I only use a brand that's got no added molasses and generally only but Speedibeet - its worth the extra cost.

Never ride a horse with an empty stomach, especially if you intend to do anything other than walk. Give a small forage based feed prior to heading out. It will absorb stomach acid and reduce risks of acid splashing up and hitting the unprotected areas of the stomach
 

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I think it's working pretty good no reoccurrence of gastric ulcers. I like the powered one better then the pellet one. My horse didn't always eat the pelleted u gard.

He seems to like the powder one I mix it with his powdered vit/min ,he'll eat it with nothing else added.

Was scoped here about two weeks ago no ulcers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ive just looked at the Outlast spec sheet and I can't see any reason to buy it if you're already feeding Alfalfa as a source of calcium for its antacid properties.
It contains magnesium which is also an antacid and seems to help with stress but its more cost effective to buy a straight magnesium supplement and feed that along with the alfalfa

I use U-Gard for a horse that's been through stress or is on medication that puts them at risk of developing ulcers, its always proven to be effective - for a more serious problem you'd need to use it alongside a course of Omeprazole. Apart from the usual antacids, it contains aloe vera which seems to help the healing process and Glycine which has a buffering effect that raises the Ph level in the stomach.

For general maintenance, having access to good hay or grazing 24/7 is generally all you need to reduce ulcer risks. Alfalfa should be enough of a calcium source, I feed magnesium as a supplement and also feed soaked sugar beet because its a good source of pectin which is also a good buffer. I only use a brand that's got no added molasses and generally only but Speedibeet - its worth the extra cost.

Never ride a horse with an empty stomach, especially if you intend to do anything other than walk. Give a small forage based feed prior to heading out. It will absorb stomach acid and reduce risks of acid splashing up and hitting the unprotected areas of the stomach
Where do you get your magnesium at? I was thinking about taking him off the Outlast and putting him on U-Guard just as a preventative. Since it's cheaper and I can get it easier.
 

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Where do you get your magnesium at? I was thinking about taking him off the Outlast and putting him on U-Guard just as a preventative. Since it's cheaper and I can get it easier.
I buy this one but I get it through Amazon

You can probably shop around and find better deals

Not relevant to your query but when I put all of my mares on this supplement I was able to take the two horribly hormonal witches off Regumate.
 

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Pure marshmallow root. :) Only thing that works for my mare. It's cheaper than most other supplements which can contain irrelevant ingredients/fillers.

I get it at Savvyteasandherbs.com (they're down for maintenance but will be back up Monday). It's the shreds/textured kind.
OR, wildhorseproducts.com (has the powder). Either one is all natural & good. :) $18-20 for a lb. You can give about 1-2 tablespoons a day for preventative.

24/7 access to pasture/hay also.
 

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Better getting powered supplements. Pelleted have fillers most of which aren't needed.
 

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This is probably going to sound super old school and rustic, but at my old barn a woman swore by using corn oil as a supplement for her mare that was prone to ulcers. Believe it or not, they said that they saw a lot of improvement with using it! I don't remember how much she gave her but it wasn't a lot and it's cheap. She just mixed it into the grain. Proceed with caution though because corn oil can also fatten up your horse! Definitely an old cowboy tactic but I think it might be worth researching! Every horse is different though so it couldn't worked for her horse but doesn't for yours. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is probably going to sound super old school and rustic, but at my old barn a woman swore by using corn oil as a supplement for her mare that was prone to ulcers. Believe it or not, they said that they saw a lot of improvement with using it! I don't remember how much she gave her but it wasn't a lot and it's cheap. She just mixed it into the grain. Proceed with caution though because corn oil can also fatten up your horse! Definitely an old cowboy tactic but I think it might be worth researching! Every horse is different though so it couldn't worked for her horse but doesn't for yours. :)
Wouldn't hurt to try it! It would definitely be a cheaper option compared to some of these supplements! Thanks!! :)
 

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I swear by Redmond daily gold(very affordable) and also have seen amazing results with the finish line U-7!
I also feed phytosana cbd which helps with proper digestion as well.
 
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Brewers yeast (inexpensive and helpful for prevention); slippery elm for hindgut ulcer prevention, lysine for flareups, according to the lady I bought Boo from (rehabs OTTBs)
 

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On the subject of slippery elm, i did use a supplement called GastroElm and enjoyed it as well. My buckskin would suck it out of the syringe
 
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I've had good results with Uckele G.UT. . I need up using it on one of the dogs when he had gut issues and it worked for him as well.
 
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