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lIke all things, there are exceptions on the opposite side of that Bell Curve.
Best example, is one one end is the poor sucker that never smoked in his life, yet got lung cancer.
On the other end, is the lucky guy who smoked all his life, yet never got lung cancer.
In the middle, and the widest part of that Bell curve, is those that smoked and got lung cancer.
That is why individual examples mean not much, except that there are exceptions, and why we have statistics, to verify any trend/association
As in all illnesses, including stereotypic behavior,there are degrees of that addiction, and also on consequences, so it is advisable to first change whatever might have caused that addiction, be it feeding problem, like sweet feed, confinement, ect, and then, if that cribbing is modified, does not affect the health of the horse, then I agree, you simply don't slap a cribbing collar on any cribber, no more then you just treat ulcers, without trying to address their cause.
That goes for about any health problem-prevention first, and not just treat the fallout, without addressing the cause or life style
While some cribbers are fine, if you have a confirmed cribber, that is loosing condition, chosing to crib instead, is destroying his front teeth, then you go to the next step, which might mean a cribbing collar
I have never had a horse with clinical ulcers, nor raised a cribber, and it is a fact, that both are associated not just with genetics and predisposition, but directly as to how those horses are fed and managed
 

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Despite exceptions, as there will always be exceptions in any condition, this is what research has established, and conclusions not drawn on a few individual exceptions:

'Nearly every horseperson has encountered a devoted cribber. These are horses that engage in the practice of cribbing, pressing their incisors into a stall door, fence post or whatever immobile object is convenient, and inhaling sharply. This habit can lead to chewed-up barns and fences, worn down teeth and health complications in horses.

Cribbing is one of the most common stable vices, which are known as stereotypies by the scientific community. There are a lot of myths and misunderstandings about this behavior that persist in the horse world. For example, it was once widely believed that horses would learn to become cribbers by watching other horses do it. Although this has been soundly disproven, some boarding stables will not allow cribbers for fear of the behavior spreading.

A new study by Swedish researchers Amir Sarrafchi and Harry J. Blokhuis suggests that there is a more harmful myth at the root of the way many horse owners manage horses that exhibit cribbing and other vices. The study, published in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior, points to research that shows that such behaviors can be linked to the way in which a horse's environment is managed. Feeding practices, housing conditions and even weaning methods can have an impact on a horse's potential for developing stereotypies.


Why do horses crib?
 

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I did have one racehorse who was a windsucker. He was an oddity with a couple of quirks. He would windsuck three times whilst eating his feed. Never any more or less and at no other time. He would stop eating, jerk his nose towards his chest and get a gulp of air.

His other quirk was that no matter how much you gave him for his breakfast feed he would eat half and leave the rest until after he had been exercised. All other meals he would lick his manger clean.
 
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