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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just found out my mare has really bad ulcers... She is very sensitive around the stomach, kicks and bites, and she seems back sore although there aren't any chiropractic problems... I feel terrible and I'm afraid of her colicing... I've only been leasing her for a month and she has had ulcers but they change their feeding scdechule, which i have no control over, recently and that leaves her for hours without food... And then I stupidly took her to a show and probably made it ten times worse... She is now biting and kicking her stomach and seems to be in pain all of the time... I am making an appointment for the vet... What should I do to give her quick relief and keep her from colicing? I am going to get a supplement for her stomach and hindgut, what supplement should I give? I love this mare so dearly and I have been trying to get her comfortable... I just took care of all of her muscle and joint problems and she was doing so so so much better but I feel like everything is lost now.... I drove out at 1 oclock in the morning last night because I was so worried about her... To make it worse, the dynamic around horse health at our barn is terrible... They are sore? Bute em up! It makes me sick and I want to leave it but I love this poor little mare too much to let her go to the owners of the barn... And I can't buy her... I just feel stuck and I feel so guilty about how much pain i am causing my mare... please help......:frown_color:
 

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I feed a supplement with my feed and it really helps my mare. It is Purina Outlast and helps a lot with all the excess acid. It is add based on body weight. It was recommended to me by a barrel racer that has had ulcer problems in several of her horses.
 

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First you DO have authority to get the vet out?

If so, get the vet as soon as you can and let the vet decide what meds to put her on. While ulcers are the likely suspect, this is not your horse. You don’t want to risk mis-diagnosing her.

For now, I would take her off anything that gets fed in a feed pan. If there are supplements she has to have, then buy straight timothy pellets to mix the supplements with and add a bit of water so she can’t eat around them. One measuring cup of Timothy pellets is sufficient per feeding.

Hopefully the barn has good hay- meaning it is not stemmy and/or full of weeds. Let her have enough hay that she won’t run out between feedings. Horses are forage animals and “trickle feeders”. They should have forage in front of them the bulk of the time.

She could also have some alfalfa hay, as alfalfa has a natural buffering capacity. It helps gastric (stomach) ulcers but is not always helpful for hind gut issues.

If you buy a bale of alfalfa, make sure it is well cured and is blister beetle-free; second cut alfalfa is generally the cut at risk to find blister beetles - even dead ones can be toxic to a horse.

I would make her alfalfa about 1/4th of the hay you give her. She will probably eat that first and wonder where the rest is because alfalfa is to horses what a prime bar of chocolate is to us:)

That’s really all you can safely do, u til you get the vet out because you need a formal diagnosis- especially since you don’t own the horse.

To reiterate, I am assuming that your leasing her, gives you some measure of responsibility and judgement in calling the vet if you pay the bill?

Not owning a horse that clearly needs help can be a Sticky wicket, so be sure you document everything, keep the vet bills and a clearly written diagnosis, in case the owner questions you:)

Best wishes and please update after the vet comes out:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, I will look into that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
First you DO have authority to get the vet out?

If so, get the vet as soon as you can and let the vet decide what meds to put her on. While ulcers are the likely suspect, this is not your horse. You don’t want to risk mis-diagnosing her.

For now, I would take her off anything that gets fed in a feed pan. If there are supplements she has to have, then buy straight timothy pellets to mix the supplements with and add a bit of water so she can’t eat around them. One measuring cup of Timothy pellets is sufficient per feeding.

Hopefully the barn has good hay- meaning it is not stemmy and/or full of weeds. Let her have enough hay that she won’t run out between feedings. Horses are forage animals and “trickle feeders”. They should have forage in front of them the bulk of the time.

She could also have some alfalfa hay, as alfalfa has a natural buffering capacity. It helps gastric (stomach) ulcers but is not always helpful for hind gut issues.

If you buy a bale of alfalfa, make sure it is well cured and is blister beetle-free; second cut alfalfa is generally the cut at risk to find blister beetles - even dead ones can be toxic to a horse.

I would make her alfalfa about 1/4th of the hay you give her. She will probably eat that first and wonder where the rest is because alfalfa is to horses what a prime bar of chocolate is to us:)

That’s really all you can safely do, u til you get the vet out because you need a formal diagnosis- especially since you don’t own the horse.

To reiterate, I am assuming that your leasing her, gives you some measure of responsibility and judgement in calling the vet if you pay the bill?

Not owning a horse that clearly needs help can be a Sticky wicket, so be sure you document everything, keep the vet bills and a clearly written diagnosis, in case the owner questions you:)

Best wishes and please update after the vet comes out:)
I can get the chiropractor out who is an equine health expert and had me start her on aloe for her stomach a while ago. It seemed to help her some but they are acting out again... I am also a minor.. I asked if I could give her some ulcergard and the person I lease from simply laughed at me and told me I am a worrywart.. I gave it to my mare anyways and I am going to continue with it for 8 days as recommended... She does get some grain (like a scoop) to mix the aloe and coconut oil i feed. When she has hay it is a good alfalfa and grass hay thankfully. They have been out on pasture in the day and get about 12 flakes for 12 horses thrown in the dry lot for the night... That doesn't last them long... They sit for a few hours in the evening without hay and then all night then a little in the morning before they can get out to pasture.. I can't feed her separately sadly.. I am leasing her for a pretty low amount and I am also a minor.. I have kind of noticed that she doesn't really seem to care what I do with her, so I am just gonna do what I think is right for this horse and kinda do it my way. But she can be odd like one time I had her earplugs in at a show and a while later I told her I had taken her earplugs out then she got mad like "you should tell me before you do something like that" It's just weird. I really wish I had the means to buy her, I know they would sell her to me.... Thank you so much for everything!
 

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I know this is a couple weeks old but please be careful with the " just do what I think is right and do it my way". This could get you into hot water with the owner. Even if we know what will help, the owner needs to give approval or you could have your lease terminated.

With that being said. The only way to help ulcers is to first treat and then feed a preventative. I prefer formula one papaya( liquid) or Redmond daily gold( clay powder). As far as the eating if she has access most of the day to feed, over night should be ok. It isn't ideal but its not unheard of.
Likewise the only way to be sure you are treating properly and not throwing money away is to scope. The aloe juice will not truthfully help for the existing ulcers, it is a preventative not a healing agent.
 
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