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I never had a problem with my sitting trot, until I got my current pony. He has a very upright shoulder, a short stride and a tendency to fall on the forehand. All of this makes his trot like a jackhammer.

My old tactics of sitting deep in the saddle, keeping my upper body straight and relaxing my core don't work for this guy. No matter what I try, I still get a bone jarring trot. He's not darting around like a wild animal or anything, he's just doing his normal, relaxed, medium trot.

What other tricks can I utilize to sit this terribly uncomfortable trot?
 

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I had a hard time with my stitting trot at first so my trainer sugested that i sit 3 strides then post 3 untill i could sit my trot for agesss
 

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A couple suggestions:

Do a whole lot of rising trot without stirrups. Post like that until your muscles are on fire and you desperately want a break. Then allow yourself to sit to the trot instead -- still without your stirrups -- and you'll probably be amazed at how much deeper you'll sit when it feels like a rest instead of MORE work!

The other thing is, with some bouncy trots, just relaxing is not enough. You have to actively move your back and hips to stay with it. Your hips need to do kind of a backwards bicycle pedaling motion. Once you have the muscle memory to stay with that motion, it makes it all so much better!
 

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The other thing is, with some bouncy trots, just relaxing is not enough. You have to actively move your back and hips to stay with it. Your hips need to do kind of a backwards bicycle pedaling motion. Once you have the muscle memory to stay with that motion, it makes it all so much better!
This. When you have this kind of trot - it's not easy until you figure out the motion and the rythym you ned to keep. Once you do - it will become "comfy" to you because you'll have the feel. It took me months to get it on Cloud.
 
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To add to what's already been said, I recommend slowing the trot down to something more comfortable, get used to that, and then speed it back up gradually. Helps you get used to your horses particular motion at something more manageable to prepare for higher speed.
I'd also caution against balancing too much on the reins. It can be tempting to use the rein tension to balance oneself as it does help to an extent, but relying on it can make you more stiff. Practice sitting trot on a loose rein and do that well before doing it with contact.
 

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I have one of those. I can sit it but no one else who rode her can, including my instructors. They just bounce.

One thing about such a trot is that if you are bouncing, the horse will get stiffer and stiffer in order to preserve their back. My dressage instructor told me not to sit it even if I can but rather ask for collection and slow down until it's actually comfortable.

It isn't good for either of you to force the sitting trot. I managed to give myself a sore upper spine by forcing it (the dressage saddle I was trying out didn't fit me).
 

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I've got a BLM mustang pony like that. Trots like a jackhammer. I've concluded only a fool tries to sit his trot. I've never seen anyone successfully do it. Nor does posting work since his trot involves a lot of strides/minute. Like a sewing machine needle. So I stand in the stirrups, which is also how I do most of my trotting anyways on any horse. Doing so reduces peak impact forces on the horse's back by 20% over either posting or sitting and I can't think of any reason to make a trot harder on my horse.

A western jog is quite different but neither of my mustangs have a "jog". BLM pony:


The horse I normally ride has a great canter and a jarring trot. I've decided a relaxed canter is better for both of us....
 

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Only sit the first 3-5 trot steps then transition down to the walk or halt. The 1st 3-5 steps the horse gets their back up to step off. Having the back up smooths the trot. This is also a strengthening exercise for the horse so go easy and don't do more than 5 in a row the take a break.
 

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For bring more active in the sitting trot with your seat, you can think of it like mini posting, except your butt doesn't leave the saddle. You should still have the controlled arc with their stride and avoid over riding with the seat.
 

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Is there a reason you can't just post the trot? It's the most simple solution, in my mind. I only ever sat the trot for short times, such as at a transition of gait. I love posting the trot, and find the horse appreciates it too.
 
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