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Right i am looking for some advice .. i have a 25 year old tb ex hunter i had homed her little over a year a go. Alternative option was being put to sleep. I had all the vet checks and it come back that she had cushings. Apart from that perfectly fine.. She is fully up to date with worm treatment and teeth and is eating and drinking perfectly fine but has lost a load of weight. I know this is normal for this breed to loss weight during winter but i am worried about her and she needs to gain weight. She is on veteran chaff cushcare pettels and cool stance copra. Some recamended pink mash and said it will help her gain weight and it is safe for her to eat... Can anyone HELP? She need to gain weight and i dont know how to do this as its the first time i have had this problem :faceshot:
 

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I used beet pulp to put some weight on one of my horses. He didn't have Custhings, but I've read it is safe for horses with Cushings. He wasn't overly fond of it, though, and I couldn't get more than a couple of pounds into him at a time. Apparently a lot of horses dont' really like it.
 

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Unfortunately I'm not much help as your feed is a lot different from mine. I will say you say she's been checked up on and her teeth were fine but WHEN did this happen? I had a horse lose a lot of weight fast and it was his teeth, I would have considered him "up to date" on his teeth but apparently they all just fell out in the short period of time between the dentist coming out and his weight loss.

For my easy keeper who developed Cushings and became a hard keeper he gets lots of quality hay. 4 pounds a day of a low NSC feed and 4 quarts of soaked beet pulp. Beet pulp is great for Cushings horses!

SOME TBs are harder keepers then others but her breed doesn't automatically make her skinny. If she hasn't always had trouble with weight could be the Cushings. Make sure that is well controlled. If she tends to lose weight in the winter feed her up BEFORE she has lost it.

Are you able to post pictures? Cushings causes muscle wasting and some horses may appear thin due to muscle loss when their actual weight is fine.

What did your vet say about this?
 

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What's the condition of her teeth? Is there enough grinding surface to chew hay?

How much of the food is he getting, in lbs? How much hay is he eating? Or grazing?

Forage is always #1. If they can't chew it enough, it'll need to be soaked/chopped.
 

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she had her teeth done 3 weeks ago.. i have had her little over a year and last two owners said she always lost alot of weight during winter but i am finding it hard to get it back on she gets feed 4 times a day has constant grass and hay
 

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WELCOME to the Forum!!

I'm not great on the differences in food products and what they are called one country to another...
When I took on a older OTTB he was emaciated.
Vet checked and brought UTD on all needed work we did.
Vet told me to feed him senior feed...didn't care what brand but feed him the amount for what he should weigh... In my horses case he should of weighed 1100 pounds...
So he was fed what a 1100 pound horse would be fed who could not chew forage/hay...
Then we fed him hay, all he wanted free-choice of a nice grass hay.
So by doing that we kept his gut happy and him busy too and added more calories to his daily requirement.
15,000 calories per day to maintain, double it plus {33,000 calories} to put weight on a horse if you do the research is what you will find...that is a lot of food.
If the horse has cushings, confirmed, then you need to speak with a nutritionist about what they can eat and not trigger a episode that could really spiral them into trouble.

So, my other horses were looking poor to my critical eye a few months ago..
I feed but they just looked ick from winter blahs...
Alfalfa cubes....
Vet told me to continue everything I was doing and add 2 scoops of cubes = about 2 pounds dry then add water to soak them so they are mash and mushy {my guy chokes}...
Did this for 10 days and his ribs have a nice covering of flesh again on them, his butt has refilled in and flanks are near flat when just looking at him...
The biggest improvement is his wither and fat pad there is now filling in...
3 years I've fought with a poor top-line on this guy...and all it seems to have needed is is some alfalfa cubes added to his diet.
Older horses also easily lose their top-line and it makes them look thin/skinny when they are not but have lost mass up top...
Are you sure it is thin/skinny everywhere or is it loss of muscle mass and hanging weight in the belly?

I don't do straight beet pulp...my horses don't eat it, period. Don't care if molasses or not, they don't like it but will eat it when processed into senior or any other kind of feed.
In the early 80's one of the barns I was at tried to fatten their horses appearance and did the beet pulp thing...
I'll never forget how ****-poor they all looked after being fed it...all had huge guts and top-line poor.
I've been very leery ever since then...
My horses refusal to eat plain beet pulp, just makes my not feeding it easier.
:runninghorse2:...
 

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Granted, but one pic & she's got a shaggy coat, and she does look a little light on, but that pic doesn't scream 'underweight' to me, but that she's lost a lot of muscle, which is normal for Cushings horses.

How much forage does she get? She should be getting at least 2% bwt daily.

What condition are her teeth in? I see she only had them done recently, so you should have a recent report?

How much(by weight) of exactly what kind of feeds? I couldn't find 'veteran chaff cushcare pettels' in google. I googled that Pink Mash & it looks like it could be a good supplement for her. Copra is a good addition too, being great for weightgain & low sugar/starch.
 

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I agree, she looks a little underweight but not bad! Are you familiar with the Henneke Body Condition Scoring System (or something like that it will come up if you google it lol). You can score her yourself and give us a number- DO keep in mind her topline will score low due to MUSCLE loss not weight.

I'll see if I can post a current pic of my guy with Cushings, he has the same topline and general appearance.
 

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You mention that your horse was tested positive for Cushing's Disease but you don't say if the horse was then put on Prascend (Pergolide) If the answer is 'no' then you really should consider it as it does make a huge difference.


Horse's with Cushing's Disease do tend to struggle to maintain healthy weight and if they've also got IR they can look cresty and have unnatural fat deposits but still look ribby.


I do like the Dodson and Horrell feeds but I'm not familiar with their newer products like the Cushcare - its described as a 'crumble' rather than a chaff (chopped forage)
If you want to stick with that brand then I think I'd maybe opt for their 'Safe and Sound' which is a chaff 'plus' and then add some of their Kwikbeet sugar beet too it don't add too much water to it - if you then use a colander/strainer to move from the soaking bucket into your feed bucket so it isn't a sloppy soupy mess
If you don't add soaked sugar beet you should always damp the chaff before feeding
They do an alfalfa chaff which would be good for weight gain
You can add extra oil to the feed


Another good feed to look at is the British Horse feeds Fibre Beet - you can add the chaff to that and extra oil


In the winter months you could try adding some haylage to the hay ration
 
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