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Discussion Starter #1
So my BO read somewhere about horses being upside down or more muscled in front then back i think it was or something to do with their muscling. She has been having us all riding in draw reins atleast once a week to correct the muscling. What can everyone tell me about this i have never heard the term and i was wondering if there were other ways to correct it if so.
 

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I saw clinician Julie Goodnight address this with a horse. The term she used for the behavior the horse presented was "stargazing," which is when a horse holds its neck and head abnormally high. She said it could be caused by training issues, rough hands, severe bits, mouth or saddle pain, hereditary, or a health issue.

What Julie Goodnight did with this horse in about 20 minutes was amazing. She kept constant contact with the horses mouth when it was stargazing, then released all pressure when the horse lowered its head to escape the contact. At the end of the session, this horse was walking and trotting on a loose rein, head down, well on its way to correct the neck muscling.

There isn't a quick fix for this issue...it takes time for muscles to grow and develop and to break out of this habit. For some horses though, it is just how they are built, and in that case there may not be much that you could do.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
most of us are riding arabians and my boy(who was off the track and has quite a few quirks) after just 2 sessions on the draw reins has learned to bring his head down by just a voice command and some pressure a certain way it has made a major difference to how he rides but i do exactly as you described pressure when his head is up none when it is down.
 

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Julie Goodnight suggested applying pressure to the reins whenever their head is up. Don't yank on the mouth or anything--apply just enough pressure to be uncomfortable so the horse will look for a way to escape it. The second their head lowers, give him the rein. After a few repetitions of this, the horse was walking with a relaxed neck. It is all about timing though--you need to release when the horse starts to lower its head so he know what you are asking of him.

I have never tried this technique myself, but it sure worked for the horse in the clinic she hosted!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
yes thats exactly what i do with outlaw and he learned super quick now just slight pressure he drops his head but it has to be a certain way he knows the difference from stop and head down i also say put it down or drop it and he does he is really smart
 
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