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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tonight when I was de-shedding Angelina I noticed that the hair in her left armpit was very, very thin. It’s not due to to a girth, since she’s no longer rideable. You can just about see the skin through the hair, but there’s no scaling or flaky skin. Normal for this time of year or no?
I know pics would help but I haven’t figured that out yet 😟 Thanks to all in advance!
PS could this be due to girth itch? I’ve been putting Swat on her midline every night, and this is the only place the fur looks so thin.
 

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If she's not itchy then probably just odd shedding. I find my gelding has very little hair in his armpits almost bald.

If not itchy and no signs of skin irritation she's probably ok. Just keep an eye on it.
 

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Look at it with a small flashlight to see if there are any bug bites there. She could also be biting herself because it itches. Or her hair could naturally be thinner in one armpit than the other:)

If you’re having to line her belly with Swat she is having a reaction to midge fly bites. My little Arab was horribly allergic to them. He also ended up with sores on his face and some along his chest and neck due to the Onchocerca worms, aka Neckthread worms, that midge flies leave under the skin from their bite.

They really aren’t worms in the true sense, rather they are microfiliae that burrow into the skin. In less common cases they can actually migrate into the eye, causing a form of uveitis.

Dont take my word, google them:)

Anyway, I got rid of the sweet itch and the NTW’s on my Arab by:

1) double dosing him with pure ivermectin - meaning two tubes of Ivermectin down the hatch at once. He was only 13,3H and it didn’t hurt him. I was sorry it took me two years to work up the courage to do that, but he was getting worse every year and so was my back to have to stand on my head and doctor him.

2). Orally Adding 10Cc’s of cow injectable Vitamin A to his feed pan twice, four weeks apart. Streeter’s belly line stayed bite-free and his face cleared up, for the next three or so years — until I laid him to rest at age 29 — RIP Streeter.

3). I noticed a bare spot on Rusty’s belly already this year. He had issues from midge fly bites last year for the first time. No NTW’s, so I just gave him 10CC’s of Vitamin A Friday. I will give him another ten in two weeks.

I forgot to check him this AM because the critter chiro came to work on everyone, including the Rottweiler who has her own story —-:rolleyes:

Tractor Supply or your local Co-Op sell the Vitamin A, if you have any cattle farmers in your area:)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
If she's not itchy then probably just odd shedding. I find my gelding has very little hair in his armpits almost bald.

If not itchy and no signs of skin irritation she's probably ok. Just keep an eye on it.
Thank you Rambo! She doesn’t seem itchy, but...as you said... “almost bald”!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Look at it with a small flashlight to see if there are any bug bites there. She could also be biting herself because it itches. Or her hair could naturally be thinner in one armpit than the other:)

If you’re having to line her belly with Swat she is having a reaction to midge fly bites. My little Arab was horribly allergic to them. He also ended up with sores on his face and some along his chest and neck due to the Onchocerca worms, aka Neckthread worms, that midge flies leave under the skin from their bite.

They really aren’t worms in the true sense, rather they are microfiliae that burrow into the skin. In less common cases they can actually migrate into the eye, causing a form of uveitis.

Dont take my word, google them:)

Anyway, I got rid of the sweet itch and the NTW’s on my Arab by:

1) double dosing him with pure ivermectin - meaning two tubes of Ivermectin down the hatch at once. He was only 13,3H and it didn’t hurt him. I was sorry it took me two years to work up the courage to do that, but he was getting worse every year and so was my back to have to stand on my head and doctor him.

2). Orally Adding 10Cc’s of cow injectable Vitamin A to his feed pan twice, four weeks apart. Streeter’s belly line stayed bite-free and his face cleared up, for the next three or so years — until I laid him to rest at age 29 — RIP Streeter.

3). I noticed a bare spot on Rusty’s belly already this year. He had issues from midge fly bites last year for the first time. No NTW’s, so I just gave him 10CC’s of Vitamin A Friday. I will give him another ten in two weeks.

I forgot to check him this AM because the critter chiro came to work on everyone, including the Rottweiler who has her own story —-:rolleyes:

Tractor Supply or your local Co-Op sell the Vitamin A, if you have any cattle farmers in your area:)
Thank you Walkiin! Yes she’s got terrible allergies to gnats, as we call them here. The first year I had her she got sweet itch and girth itch before I learned how to prevent them. But I’ve never had to put Swat on her armpits before, just her midline and under her jaw.
I did notice a couple of small bumps in the area which could be insect bites.
Just in case anyone else’s horse had issues with sweet itch: I prevent it from affecting Angelina by rubbing a bit of MTG on the base of her mane and tail once a week...it works!
 

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The thing with neck thread worms is they live for a long, long time encysted in the neck (mostly) they produce microfilarae which then migrate back to the midline and a few other places. The ivermectin will not kill the adults. There isn't anything that will unless they have come up with something new. But if you treat the way Walkin described every year from the year you notice they eventually die off and as long as no other horses have them you should be to go.
 

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My Teddy also loses fur there in his spring shed. The first year I thought it was the girth, and in fact he had a girth gall as well, but I last year it happened even with the soft real fleece girth (the hair loss, not the gall), and this year he hasn't been ridden in months and he's still bare down there. I think it's just the way he sheds. He'll grow it back, but it will be bare for a month or so.
 

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Same with my girl, after shedding you can almost see through her hair in the same area. Just make sure it's not medical, but it seems it's not unusual for horses to shed like that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Should I treat her with ivermectin? No problems getting that at the local grain elevator, but I’m not sure about the vitamin A.
And many thanks to all who took the time to help! Honestly, after eight years of horse ownership, you’d think I’d know about the subject!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
As a nurse I truly hate parasites. Parasites have their own parasites which have their own parasites. Any creature which sucks off the life of another is disgusting.
I couldn’t agree more...vile things! My OCD frequently focuses on parasites...wish they could be wiped off the face of the earth 😖
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Update: this morning I noticed a small spot where it was mostly her black skin showing through... same area. What hair that remained was “staring”.
Insect bite? Girth itch? Or something else? My vet is elderly, just got out of the hospital, and isn’t making any house calls yet 😐
 
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