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Hello al I am new to the horse world (thanks to my ten year old daughter). I was wondering if anyone has a simple checklist or a way to keep track of immunizations, worming and stuff like that.

Any help would be awseome.

Thanks Scott
 

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Welcome to the board, Scott.

Your vet will keep copies of the records, and will give you the originals at the time of service. Or vice versa, depending on the vet. Either way, you'll get a copy for yourself.

I put mine in a manila folder with the horse's name on the tab. That way, I know who the vet has seen and what's been done for each animal.

You can keep the horse's negative coggins in this folder too, and make copies whenever you want to take the animal someplace that requires a copy of it.

As far as wormings, that'll be up to you. I worm my horses on a rotational, 8-week schedule. There are worming charts you can find on the internet that will take the guesswork out of it, or you can have your vet recommend a particular routine.
 

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are you asking about keeping records of your own horses records ? my horses all have record books

Forms - United States Pony Clubs

go to the letter 'r' and click on record book guide, health & maintenance. it gives you a good set up for keeping track of expenses & vet visits & history of your horse.
 

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As far as wormings, that'll be up to you. I worm my horses on a rotational, 8-week schedule. There are worming charts you can find on the internet that will take the guesswork out of it, or you can have your vet recommend a particular routine.
Please do not follow the deworming charts you find online. They all tend to be out-of-date and recommend using products that often are no longer effective at lowering parasite numbers. If someone tells you you need to be deworming every 6-8 weeks and rotating dewormers, just keep looking for sound and up-to-date advice as that plan is 40 years old and no longer considered appropriate.

For deworming, I would recommend that you start reading up with a fewer "primer" sort of articles and then watch the strategic deworming webinar that is available on www.thehorse.com

http://www.thehorse.com/pdf/factsheets/deworming/deworming.pdf
http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0104.pdf
http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0204.pdf
http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0404.pdf
http://www.thehorse.com/Parasites/Parasites0504.pdf

The Horse | Videos: Webinars
 

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Or, when it comes to deworming, listen to what your vet says is best for your area...
 

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Try Rendaivu.com Its like a Equine management Online record keeping program. I record everything from Farrier to Vet to show records to worming ect. It even sends you emails when they are due! Love it.
 

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I have a manila folder that I keep all receipts from the vet/farrier in as well as a spreadsheet of what we have given and when since we generally pick up the vaccinations and then give them ourselves.

We have to haul the brand inspection paperwork everywhere we go with the horse so I have it in the manila folder as well along with the purchase agreement. This way whenever we go somewhere, I take the folder and if anything should happen/go wrong I have everything.

What I haul around is all copies, my sister-in-law has all the originals in her fireproof safe at her place since that is where my horse lives.
 

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Or, when it comes to deworming, listen to what your vet says is best for your area...
Unfortunately this is often not true. Most vets are still recommending the every 6-8 week rotation. Deworming tends to be one of those things that vets don't spend alot of time keeping up with because there are much cooler and more interesting issues in the veterinary medical profession. And many of the vets that people use are mixed practice vets who spend even less time keeping up with horse issues.
 

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Unfortunately this is often not true. Most vets are still recommending the every 6-8 week rotation. Deworming tends to be one of those things that vets don't spend alot of time keeping up with because there are much cooler and more interesting issues in the veterinary medical profession. And many of the vets that people use are mixed practice vets who spend even less time keeping up with horse issues.
Although I think if rotational deworming was as ineffective as you always claim it to be, ALL vets would stop using/recommending it. It's not like veterinarians go to school, graduate and then don't update their knowledge base ever again. They keep up on issues, they attend seminars, conferences... yet, they still use rotational deworming. Can't be all that bad now, can it?
 

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ryle is right, that is outdated.

my vet does 2 fecal testings a year & use dewormer 3 times a year based on the findings.

like ryle also said, vets do keep up to date on somethings, but they dont rego to vet school every year & couldnt possibly have enough time to study every new finding about everything

just because your vet hasnt changed from rotational worming, doesnt mean a lot havent !!!!
 

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Although I think if rotational deworming was as ineffective as you always claim it to be, ALL vets would stop using/recommending it. It's not like veterinarians go to school, graduate and then don't update their knowledge base ever again. They keep up on issues, they attend seminars, conferences... yet, they still use rotational deworming. Can't be all that bad now, can it?
Do you know how often CURRENT deworming information is presented at equine veterinary conferences or even mixed animal veterinary conferences with equine lectures? In the last 10 years, it's been a random notation on resistance issues in the proceedings somewhere and lightly touched on in an occasional lecture. It's only in the last year that the veterinary conferences have had major discussions on new deworming strategies and the need for them. And truthfully, you are much more likely to find a vet tech attending those lectures than a veterinarian.

Veterinarians have a limited amount of time for keeping up-to-date on an infinite number of issues yearly. Generally they have an area that they are particularly interested in such as metabolic disease, orthopedic surgery, reproduction. Deworming and vaccine schedules just aren't generally on the top of their lists of interests. It's more often the veterinary technicians who are going to keep up-to-date on the preventative medicine aspects of animal care.

I'm sorry if you feel that I'm mis-representing the facts, but there are years of research to back up the resistance issues and there have been public and veterinary professional presentations in the last year that have brought to light the newer recommendations. Take a look at some of the new information for yourself if you don't believe what I am saying. Best to know for sure what you are talking about before you go giving advice to other horse owners.
The Horse | Will the Worms Win? Part 2: Resistance

The Horse | Parasite Resistance: 10 Things to Remember

The Horse | Delaying Dewormer Resistance: Advice Offered in Study
 

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Best to know for sure what you are talking about before you go giving advice to other horse owners.
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=14011
Maybe you should take your own advice for a change!

And truthfully, you are much more likely to find a vet tech attending those lectures than a veterinarian.

I have to wonder if the vets you work for know you go around telling the whole world how stupid and uninformed all vets are and how the techs are the only people who know anything.
You might also not want to sweep the entire vet world with the same broad brush of inadequacy you paint the vets you are associated with.

My Beau gave accurate advice and I truly hope that anyone on the internet listens to their local vet LONG before they listen to some vet tech on an internet BB.
Sure, use the information you got here to start a conversation with your vet. But your vet knows your area.


Both of equine practices in my area have been, for over a year, telling their clients about resistance, testing and the new theories on deworming. The practice I use has not only sent out an email news letter on it, but a mailer too. They also offered a hands on evening clinic where you could see how a fecal test was done and learned all about the latest and greatest on the topic. Their free spring seminar also included a presentation on it. The VETS are very active in keeping up on the latest information that keeps the animals in their care safe.
 

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Both of equine practices in my area have been, for over a year, telling their clients about resistance, testing and the new theories on deworming. The practice I use has not only sent out an email news letter on it, but a mailer too. They also offered a hands on evening clinic where you could see how a fecal test was done and learned all about the latest and greatest on the topic. Their free spring seminar also included a presentation on it.
thats great that your vets keep so up to date most are unable to.
 
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