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I recently adopted in this 16.2hh 8yr old thoroughbred mare and she's kind of bony, okay she's REALLY bony.
My horses have always been short and stocky quarter horses, so I never really had to worry about them losing weight. (Although they could gain it so eaisly.)

She belonged to a friend of mine who had 30 other horses on her property and didn't have time to really care for them individually. This mare was kinda at the bottom of the pecking order and had to fight for her share during feeding time.
She's healthy, hooves look great but she needs some weight.
So right now I need some suggestions for weight gain.
I've heard corn oil? But then, I was told that it's not good for their joints?
Oh, and she's up to date on all her shots and worming.
 

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Give her all the hay she can eat...constantly have hay in front of her.
If her teeth are good and she eats well, can digest and utilize her feed she should start to pick up weight within 10-15 days on hay alone.
Her not having to fend off the other horses and be run off will by itself let her eat her fill and start her weight gain...
If you do bales she will probably eat more than 1/2 bale on her own with no problem...if you do round bales she will gorge herself till she realizes no one is taking it away and that she has stuffed herself and there is still food for her...she is hungry and that takes time to fill that void.
Make sure she has a endless supply of clean, clear water to drink at all times...

If she needs "extra" calories and you are able to feed her grain/concentrate...even though she is not "old" she would do well on a senior feed as it is processed differently and horses are able to get the nutrients out of this feed better than others.
Purina now has a entire line of feeds that have the Amplify fat nugget in them for added weight gain...the line is called Healthy Edge.
Many also swear by Purina Strategy Healthy Edge style as a great weight builder yet not a feed that makes a "hot" horse. Strategy in either form "original or healthy edge" are calorie dense feeds so you can feed less and get more calories than some other grains that don't pack as much in per pound...
There is also a Purina supplement sold individually called Amplify that is a fat nugget to give extra calories for weight gain without making them "hot" from grain overload. This is a additional supplement only though and not to be fed as the source of their grain.

When I had a rescue so severely underweight my vet recommended a can of beer be poured over the top of the Sr. feed I was feeding to enhance and get more weight on ASAP...my guy was a "1" on the scale and we had not time at first but urgency to keep him alive.{dark beer is best but any beer works}
I have friends who swear by feeding a loaf of bread {day old is cheap} works in weight gain too.


That should get you started...remember to consult your vet too. They have insight none of us can as they can see and touch the animal and live in your area knowing food and weather conditions...all need taken into consideration.
 

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When I had a rescue so severely underweight my vet recommended a can of beer be poured over the top of the Sr. feed I was feeding to enhance and get more weight on ASAP...my guy was a "1" on the scale and we had not time at first but urgency to keep him alive.{dark beer is best but any beer works}
I have friends who swear by feeding a loaf of bread {day old is cheap} works in weight gain too.

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Very interesting.. I've never heard of that.

We have an older, going on 34, gelding who started having trouble maintaining his weight last year. He lost a bit over the winter and wouldn't pick it up no matter what I tried. Finally with a good helping of his standard grain, beet pulp and alfalfa, topped with the max serving of Cool Calories, he's back to where he should be and doing great. Granted, he has very few teeth left and is ridiculously old, so it's a bit different from your scenario, but I think the big help was Cool calories. I've also heard very good things about Rice bran (?) Oil(?). It's pretty expensive, but a lot of horse folk on here recommend it. Good luck and let us know how it works out!
 

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TC senior is also good for putting weight on a horse beet pulp is another thing that will put weight on. Feed lots of hay should have hay 24/7.

I wouldnt be feeding a loaf of bread a day not good for them.
 

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Someone here recently talked about 'tiers' of feeding horses for weight, and I thought it was brilliant. Basically it was that tier 1 is free choice hay +/- a ration balancer, then tier 2 added in some basic grain. Tier 3 included supplementary feeds like Rice Bran, oils, cool cals, etc. I think there were 5 total, and I may have missed some details, but I like it because it is a very good way to approach feeding thin horses, no matter if they are rescues, hard keepers, or just hard working.

My guy gets free choice hay and some rice bran (Nutrena Empower Boost) according to the season and how hard he's working. I really like the Boost, he eats it readily, it's not going to cause a sugar/insulin spike as most of the calories are from fat/oil, and it's got flax in it which helps out on the Omega 3 front too (nice for my sensitive skin boy).
 

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Have hay in front of her 24/7. Doesn't have to be the best quality, but a good idea is have really nice hay that will have little waste loose, but have slightly worse quality, or one with a bit of waste in a bag. Grain, no sweet feed. Get a good cob or senior grain. Rice bran, oil of any sort, flax seed and alfalfa pellets are all good choices. What you need for a healthy horse is constant fiber.

For our old geezer, we took 2 scoops beet pulp, 1 scoop alfalfa, half of a scoop of rice bran all soaked for 6 hours or overnight. Granted, he was 38-41 with no teeth so that was all he was getting.
 

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Very interesting.. I've never heard of that.
Never heard of it before either but that is what the vet said would also help.

I am positive beer also can help a horse to sweat that is having a problem, so in this winter weather I would be careful.
My friend feeds loaves of day old bread to her older horses ground up like bread crumb crumbles...swears by it that it helps.
She has "-" temperatures often so...IDK...her horses are fat and sassy beasts and many are older, retired and look great. They are all t/o during the day and come in at night when it is the coldest and most dangerous weather conditions for them to handle.

Best advice is... Consult YOUR vet before doing any "additives"...every horse, location should be evaluated on a individual basis to meet those special needs.

Good luck.
 

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There have been some great suggestions posted concerning putting weight on your horse. I would not consider bread because of all of the sugars in it but that's just my personal opinion, also, I probably wouldn't be able to convince my horse to eat it! I would like to suggest a senior horse ration because it has more fat components that won't give your horse added energy or make it "hot" like a performance feed will. Adding oil on top of your grain is a great and inexpensive way to add fats to your horse's diet. A supplement that is rich in canola oil and flax seed oil is EquinePOWER. It is also rich in Omega3s which can give your horse a shiny coat! I would suggest trying that because it has cool energy!
Also, Has your horse had her teeth done recently? Points and sharp edges on their teeth can make it difficult to chew. I would suggest looking into that.
Always consult your veterinarian first if you are unsure of a feed or supplement!
 

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A pint of Guinness used to be a staple supplement for the old European eventers and fox hunters. There are better things now. How ever there is something appealing about one for the horse and one for me.

The others have pretty well covered the added fat and calories. Beet pulp puts on weight without adding much starch to the digestive system. Most senior feeds are loaded with beet pulp. Adding more wouldn't hurt.

Most vegetable oil is soy oil. It's cheap, it works but there is that Omega 6 vs. Omega 3 thing going on. It's loaded with the bad fat so not a long term solution however it's been done for years so adding a little as a jump start probably doesn't hurt. I've done it a few times. It works.

Rice bran is about 20% fat. Good readily available supplement.

I'd pass on the bread too. I've heard of it before. I've seen it done. Not impressed. I can buy a pickup truck load of stale bread here for $7. Still doesn't tempt me. I do throw it out for the wild birds and did buy a garbage bag full when I had free range chickens but they had a feeder full of pellets on top of that too. Just not a lot of nutrition and just carbs and sugar in it.

If you search through the old threads here there is post after post about TBs that need weight and the solutions. A lot of TBs are hard keepers and seem like they consume endless feed and still look thin. Yours will probably do fine once she can eat a good meal in peace. Just do any changes slowly.
 
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