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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
soooo I don't own a horse, and my loan is pretty non problematic, as far as injurys go, her owner will leave me instructions on what to do if there is a problem with her.

so because of this I actually know very little at upkeep other than how to groom and handle a horse... and a bit about mixing feed, haying ect...


any way to get to the point, I saw an ad for a horse... their previous loaner had put baby oil on the horse to treat sweet itch and then turned them out (according to the owner, loaner said the horse was stalled) but the baby oil essentially burnt the horse- leaving scaring on the poor thing all over her mane and tail...


thinking about it, as someone who wants to keep a horse by themselves, I would NOT have known such an injury was possible- so now I'm wondering if there are other wise sensible sounding ideas that actually work out terrible irl...
or just some odd scraps of advice/sayings you think are worth knowing!
 

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Maybe you already know this but the first thing that comes to mind is:

Turning a horse out soaking wet does NOT help them cool off.
 

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Huh, I used to use unscented baby oil on my horse's dock to keep it moisturized and keep her from rubbing. Maybe that horse just had a bad reaction? Or maybe it was out in INTENSE sun and the oil exacerbated a sunburn?

Weeeeird. I never had any problems from it.
 

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It might have gotten the mane & coat sunburnt but even my pink skinned horses don't sunburn under the fur. They will sunburn on their noses and around their eyes. I'd think the coat got all burnt looking which is unsightly but isn't scarring. I'd have to know more.
 

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It sounds like that horse already had a skin problem, sweet itch and it could have been rubbing those areas and made the skin raw.
I have never seen a reaction from baby oil
 

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Maybe you already know this but the first thing that comes to mind is:

Turning a horse out soaking wet does NOT help them cool off.



Yes. What people do not realize is that if you don't streagle (use the scraper to squeegey the water off the horse), that water that is clinging to your horse after you hosed him down is actually HOLDING IN the heat!


But, if you streagle (squeegey) it off, DAMP fir will cool him off better than either WET or DRY.






Little bit of wierd history . . . . I'm using the word 'streagle' without knowing how to spell it. It's an old Greek word I think, wherein men who worked out hard at the Gymnasium would use a blade to scrape off the sweat (and stink) from their bodies. They would then ( get this!) put it into vials and give to lady friends , or even sell if they were a famous warrior. You see, women would go mad for the scent.!! . . yeah, right!
 

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Yes. What people do not realize is that if you don't streagle (use the scraper to squeegey the water off the horse), that water that is clinging to your horse after you hosed him down is actually HOLDING IN the heat!


But, if you streagle (squeegey) it off, DAMP fir will cool him off better than either WET or DRY.






Little bit of wierd history . . . . I'm using the word 'streagle' without knowing how to spell it. It's an old Greek word I think, wherein men who worked out hard at the Gymnasium would use a blade to scrape off the sweat (and stink) from their bodies. They would then ( get this!) put it into vials and give to lady friends , or even sell if they were a famous warrior. You see, women would go mad for the scent.!! . . yeah, right!
I just HAD to look this up. It's "strigil", and yeah, the greeks, who were very big on male beauty and getting buff, didn't use water to clean themselves after a workout, they would smear olive oil on themselves and "strigil" it off. I did not know that thing about the vials. Even though I like the smell of sweat on my guy as much as the next lady, I have to say ... ick.
 

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@Avna thank you for clarifying that. It made such an impression on me back when I read it somewhere. Yeah, women would pay a lot of money for the sweaty oil of certain men.



that said, it's probably better for one's skin than soap and water.
 

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I remember being a teen in the 80s and people would use baby oil to speed up getting a tan. I wouldn't ever use baby oil (on me or my horse) just because mineral oil isn't a quality oil. I wonder if the horse had a reaction to the oil? Or if the skin was really sensitive and irritated and the oil caused the horse to burn in the sun?


The only thing I have encountered so far in my four months of horse ownership is that horses MUST have shoes. Miss Lulu had only been at the trainer's barn for a couple of days when the farrier came out and it was decided Lulu should be barefoot. My husband (who isn't a horse person) was worried about our horse being shoe-less but I told him I trusted our trainer and the farrier could always come out and put shoes on Lulu if needed.
 

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Now what we need to do is for one of the lady forum members to go to a gym and pick out a hunk who is nice and sweaty and ask if you can smear olive oil on them and then scrape the strigil off and bottle it Then send samples to other female forum members for testing.

Do we have any volunteers?
 

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Now what we need to do is for one of the lady forum members to go to a gym and pick out a hunk who is nice and sweaty and ask if you can smear olive oil on them and then scrape the strigil off and bottle it Then send samples to other female forum members for testing.

Do we have any volunteers?
Now, y'all 'r gettin' jes' plain skeery.
 

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Now what we need to do is for one of the lady forum members to go to a gym and pick out a hunk who is nice and sweaty and ask if you can smear olive oil on them and then scrape the strigil off and bottle it Then send samples to other female forum members for testing.

Do we have any volunteers?
Huh? What kind of science is this supposed to be? You need to bottle sweat from random hunks and slobs, then have your testers arrange the sample by pleasantness of scent. Then you have the same testers arrange the portrait photos of the donors by perceived attractiveness.

Now you have a data set you can work with! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Lol I was not expecting this thread to end up here 😂😂

To clear up some confusion- the horse was a chestnut/palomino, pics not clear... and unfortunatly it sounds as if she will never be able to grow out her fur on her face as well as patches on her mane and tail- I really have no clue what she ate but my guess would be it was probably a really hot day and she had no shade... it was just an ad like I said but it did get me thinkkng...

Anyways feel free to continue with the man sweat convos... maybe you could bottle and sell it?
 

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Just want to say water on horses works fine in southern Arizona. At 10% humidity with a breeze, the water evaporates. I've never scrapped water off a horse and won't while I live here. On a hot day, I hose them off and they wiggle around, showing me spots I missed. Then roll in the dirt. And are dry VERY quickly! Water evaporating in a breeze is a lot like a description of an evaporative cooler.

This isn't Greece. Or San Antonio.

Which is the problem with a lot of advice one gets. It may be true for horses in a certain area, or for certain horses, or for certain approaches to riding, but irrelevant for others. As a new owner, one spends a lot of time asking other people, trying things, and hoping not to do too much harm while learning.
 

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The 'must scrape water off or your horse will overheat' thing is a myth, debunked on several veterinary sites and pages. If it was true, horses that were rained on and then stood in the hot sun on a humid afternoon would be dropping like flies. It's common here to get soaking thunderstorms and then the sun comes out and the heat index goes back up to a zillion degrees with no wind and high humidity and nobody goes out to scrape of their horses..... We used to have sprinklers up for the horses as one of their pastures had no shade. They would go stand in the sprinkler and get soaked, then wander off and stand in the sun grazing. If I was out there I'd scrape them off, but it seemed to make very little difference in drying time and no difference in horse comfort whether I did so or not.


The only time I could see it making a noticeable difference would be if a horse was already in heat exhaustion where you need the cooling to happen as fast as possible. But hosing off a horse and turning him out on a hot day is not going to hurt him. A couple of our 4H kids brought it up and the vet laughed.
 

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Advise:
Always untie your horse and throw the rope around their necks before you open the trailer door. Make them back, never turn around.

Never get frustrated with a horse and show it/let it affect you.

Always take about a week or two to bond with your horse and learn them before you just jump on and go.

Expose your horse safely to new objects and sounds every day and reintroduce what they already know.

Always keep some Koppertox in your barn for your horse's hoofs!!

Always think through something (think of the worst situation that could bloom from the current situation), avoid the situation the best you can by taking precautions, and keep your horse and you safe. (Only use this thinking if you and your horse are in danger or something could become dangerous)

Just some things I've learned over the years!!
 
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